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VTBoy
2004-Nov-09, 11:07 PM
Which least known scientist do you think is greatly under appreciated for his or her work.

I say Nikola Tesla for one, which others can you think of.

ToSeek
2004-Nov-09, 11:09 PM
Euler?


He made decisive and formative contributions to geometry, calculus and number theory. He integrated Leibniz's differential calculus and Newton's method of fluxions into mathematical analysis. He introduced beta and gamma functions, and integrating factors for differential equations. He studied continuum mechanics, lunar theory with Clairaut, the three body problem, elasticity, acoustics, the wave theory of light, hydraulics, and music. He laid the foundation of analytical mechanics, especially in his Theory of the Motions of Rigid Bodies (1765).

We owe to Euler the notation f(x) for a function (1734), e for the base of natural logs (1727), i for the square root of -1 (1777), p for pi, Sigma for summation (1755), the notation for finite differences http://www-gap.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Symbolgifs/bigdelta.gify and http://www-gap.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Symbolgifs/bigdelta.gif2y and many others.

- http://www-gap.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Mathematicians/Euler.html

It's also been pointed out that the credit for Maxwell's Equations in their present form should go to Oliver Heaviside. (http://www-gap.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Mathematicians/Heaviside.html)

Silent Knight
2004-Nov-10, 12:02 AM
How about Rene Descartes? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rene_Descartes) Since he is normally just considered a philosopher.


Mathematicians consider Descartes of the utmost importance for his discovery of analytic geometry. Up to Descartes's times, geometry, dealing with lines and shapes, and algebra, dealing with numbers, appeared as completely different subsets of mathematics. Descartes showed how to translate (almost) all problems in geometry into problems in algebra, by regarding them as questions asking for the length of a line segment, and using a coordinate system to describe the problem.

Descartes's theory provided the basis for the calculus of Newton and Leibniz, and thus for much of modern mathematics. This appears even more astounding when one keeps in mind that the work was just meant as an example to his Discours de la méthode.

Makgraf
2004-Nov-10, 12:07 AM
Jöns Jakob Berzelius was a 19th century chemist who discovered 4 elements, found the atomic weights of 45 of the (then) 49 known elements, analysed over 2000 compounds and discovered that water was made of 2 hydrogen atoms and 1 oxygen (though some would disagree (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=7367)).

Most importantly though he invented the modern chemical language of representing elements with a common nomencalture. So instead of a hydrogen being spelt out or different shapes it could now be shown simply as H. This not only helped internationalize science but let chemicals be represented mathamatically.

Normandy6644
2004-Nov-10, 03:07 AM
Amongst the general public? Has to be Maxwell. Very few people know who he is, and yet he is one of the most important historical figures of all time.

Swift
2004-Nov-10, 01:46 PM
You mean other than me? :wink: :roll: :oops:

Berzelius is a very good choice.

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Nov-10, 01:50 PM
how many people really know Gauss?

Eta C
2004-Nov-10, 02:02 PM
John Bardeen. If you don't know why he's important, you should.

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Nov-10, 02:11 PM
John Bardeen. If you don't know why he's important, you should.
Trivia question: how many other people have won two or more Nobel prizes in the same category?

TriangleMan
2004-Nov-10, 02:13 PM
The same category? I'm thinking the Curies did but I don't know of anyone else, unless someone won the Peace Prize twice.

Normandy6644
2004-Nov-10, 02:15 PM
how many people really know Gauss?

I was thinking about him too. Considering his contributions in so many areas of science and math, he should be better known.

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Nov-10, 02:23 PM
The same category? I'm thinking the Curies did
X

Only one Curie won two, and she did it in different categories.


but I don't know of anyone else
you mean, other than Bardeen?

Eta C
2004-Nov-10, 02:27 PM
One. Fredrick Sanger won the 1958 Chemistry prize and shared the 1980 Chemistry prize. Marie Curie won in Chemistry and in Physics while Linus Pauling won the Chemistry and Peace prizes.

As to John Bardeen, one of the two Nobels in Physics he won was as one of the co-inventors of the transistor, the importance of which should be obvious.

[Shameless personal plug] While I was in grad school at Illinois my office was just down the hall from Bardeen's. I reallly can't claim to have known him, just a couple of short conversations. A great physicist, but also a truely nice person. [/shameless personal plug]

Nicolas
2004-Nov-10, 08:42 PM
Change the thread title, it is misleading. I thought someone was looking for me :roll:

Gauss would indeed make a good entry. All things he worked on! And indeed he is not known by many. Euler is more known I think. But there are lots and lots of important relatively unknown people. I mean, if you've studied, you've all heard of Maxwell and Gauss (at least you remember the names, maybe not exactly who did what). Berzelius and Bardeen are someting else. The invention of the transistor was only placed "in the Bell laboratories" in the lectures I had.

Makgraf
2004-Nov-10, 08:43 PM
John Bardeen. If you don't know why he's important, you should.
Trivia question: how many other people have won two or more Nobel prizes in the same category?
James Priss won two nobel's in physics. :D

Bob
2004-Nov-10, 09:13 PM
Rosalind Franklin

Jocelyn Bell

mutineer
2004-Nov-10, 11:06 PM
I think the best answers to this question are likely to be found among those who do not immediately ring up the word "scientist" - perhaps because their powers of analysis or invention were directed towards immediately practical ends, or towards fields outside the main branches of physics, chemistry or biology.

My vote would go to the man whom I regard as the greatest genius of the Twentieth Century. Read about this man and you will come to share my own admiration. There is no Nobel Prize for radio engineers - but as a theoretical scientist he was in the top division:

Claude Elwood Shannon.

Candy
2004-Nov-10, 11:15 PM
Mileva Maric Einstein (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8336494&pt=Mileva%20Einstein)

Mileva participated in her husband's scientific work as acknowledged in letters written by him. She is now deemed a co-creator of Einstein's Theory of Relativity for which he received the Nobel Prize in 1921. I would love to know what Albert possessed over her that made her take a back seat to co-success or co-acknowledgement.
Candy->http://smilies.jeeptalk.org/otn/funny/outtahere.gif<-A Thousand Pardons'

Silent Knight
2004-Nov-11, 07:09 AM
Here is some more information about Mileva Maric (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mileva_Maric).


Einstein admired Mileva's intellectual independence and ambitions. He once said that he was lucky to find Mileva, "a creature who is my equal and who is strong and independent as I am".

The extent of Mileva's contribution to Einstein's work is controversial. According to Evan Harris Walker, a physicist, the basic ideas for relativity came from Mileva. Senta Troemel-Ploetz, a German linguist, says that the ideas may have been Albert's, but Mileva did the mathematics. On the other hand, John Stachel, keeper of Albert's letters, says that Mileva was little more than a sounding board. The case for Mileva as co-genius mostly depends on letters in which Albert referred to "our" theory and "our" work and on a divorce agreement in which Albert promised her his Nobel Prize money. He gave to Mileva the money from the Nobel Prize he received but he did not publicly acknowledge her scientific involvement in his work.

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Nov-11, 12:09 PM
Mileva Maric Einstein (http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8336494&pt=Mileva%20Einstein)

Mileva participated in her husband's scientific work as acknowledged in letters written by him. She is now deemed a co-creator of Einstein's Theory of Relativity for which he received the Nobel Prize in 1921. I would love to know what Albert possessed over her that made her take a back seat to co-success or co-acknowledgement.
Candy->http://smilies.jeeptalk.org/otn/funny/outtahere.gif<-A Thousand Pardons'
she lost interest in physics so he moved on :)

I don't think anyone deems Mileva Maric a co-creator of the Theory of Relativity, and Einstein did not receive the Nobel prize for the theory--officially, the prize was for the photoelectric effect I think.

We've talked about this before:
Einstein's greatest blunder (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=280111&highlight=mileva#280111)
Fun facts about Albert Einstein! (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=255063&highlight=mileva#255063)
Re: Einstein didn't write his own material? (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=252606&highlight=mileva#252606)

Candy
2004-Nov-11, 12:35 PM
Candy->http://smilies.jeeptalk.org/otn/funny/outtahere.gif<-A Thousand Pardons'
We've talked about this before:
Einstein's greatest blunder (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=280111&highlight=mileva#280111)
Fun facts about Albert Einstein! (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=255063&highlight=mileva#255063)
Re: Einstein didn't write his own material? (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=252606&highlight=mileva#252606) Why do you think I'm running? :lol:

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Nov-11, 01:48 PM
afraid of success? :)

Candy
2004-Nov-11, 01:53 PM
afraid of success? :)
If you are success, then yes. 8)

Candy
2004-Nov-11, 02:06 PM
:o

(Someone just deleted a post.)

Normandy6644
2004-Nov-11, 03:15 PM
I don't think anyone deems Mileva Maric a co-creator of the Theory of Relativity, and Einstein did not receive the Nobel prize for the theory--officially, the prize was for the photoelectric effect I think.

From the Nobel website:

"Albert Einstein, for his services to Theoretical Physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect."

Candy
2004-Nov-11, 03:24 PM
I don't think anyone deems Mileva Maric a co-creator of the Theory of Relativity, and Einstein did not receive the Nobel prize for the theory--officially, the prize was for the photoelectric effect I think.

From the Nobel website:

"Albert Einstein, for his services to Theoretical Physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect."
Someone lead that horse to water (meaning there were several educated women in Einstein's life), because the horse didn't like drinking the water on its own. 8-[

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Nov-11, 03:29 PM
Someone lead that horse to water (meaning there were several educated women in Einstein's life), because the horse didn't like drinking the water on its own.
That's "led" right?

other questions:

Horse -- Einstein?
Water -- mathematics, relativity?
Someone -- several educated women
Drinking -- learning?

or is it

Horse -- grapes?
Water -- woo-woo?
Someone -- several educated women
Drinking -- listening?

:)

Candy
2004-Nov-11, 03:44 PM
Someone lead that horse to water (meaning there were several educated women in Einstein's life), because the horse didn't like drinking the water on its own.
That's "led" right?

other questions:

Horse -- Einstein?
Water -- mathematics, relativity?
Someone -- several educated women
Drinking -- learning?

or is it

Horse -- grapes?
Water -- woo-woo?
Someone -- several educated women
Drinking -- listening?

:) God, I love you and Normandy6644 (personalities). What I wouldn't do to bottle both your personalities and make one Candy-made man. :P