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Wally
2004-Nov-10, 12:55 PM
From this (http://www.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/asiapcf/11/10/dingo/index.html) CNN article on a 5 yr old who defended her 3 month old sister from a dingo:


"If it had of just grabbed the baby and yanked it off the bed, it wouldn't have been very nice."




Uhmmmm. Yeaaahhhhh. 8-[

mickal555
2004-Nov-10, 01:14 PM
That was on A Curent affair (a Curent affair's program)

Nicolas
2004-Nov-10, 01:28 PM
Maybe we could extend this thread to a general understatement quotes thread? The BABB is a good source :) Don't get me wrong, I really respect all posters, search my posts and you'll probably get a nice list of (unintended) understatements posted by me too (a lecturer once called the loss of all engine power on a 4-engine airliner "unwanted", but I was clever enough not to rewrite that on the BABB until now :) ). I just think it would be illustrative to see some people's (wrong) visions on a certain subject, or their humour. Maybe we should add after each understatement whether it was used deliberatly or not?

One I personally liked from my own interests:

(unintended understatement)
Someone referred to the Boeing 747 once as a
medium sized object

(it's about the largest plane you can possibly see flying overhead until now, and the very few ones that are larger aren't much larger)

I'd love to see other understatements!

PS It would indeed not have been very nice from the dingo. Baaaaaaaad dingo!

Wally
2004-Nov-10, 01:40 PM
One of my favorites in this catagory. . .


Dr. Egon Spengler: There's something very important I forgot to tell you.
Dr. Peter Venkman: What?
Dr. Egon Spengler: Don't cross the streams.
Dr. Peter Venkman: Why?
Dr. Egon Spengler: It would be bad.
Dr. Peter Venkman: I'm fuzzy on the whole good/bad thing. What do you mean "bad"?
Dr. Egon Spengler: Try to imagine all life as you know it stopping instantaneously, and every molecule in your body exploding at the speed of light.
Dr. Raymond Stantz: Total protonic reversal!
Dr. Peter Venkman: Right, that's bad. Okay, alright, important safety tip, thanks Egon.


=D>

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Nov-10, 01:42 PM
Someone referred to the Boeing 747 once as a
medium sized object

(it's about the largest plane you can possibly see flying overhead until now, and the very few ones that are larger aren't much larger)
Until now? It wasn't even the largest when it was first rolled out

and it may not be a medium size plane, but it's certainly a smallish object :)

mickal555
2004-Nov-10, 01:43 PM
One of my favorites in this catagory. . .


Dr. Egon Spengler: There's something very important I forgot to tell you.
Dr. Peter Venkman: What?
Dr. Egon Spengler: Don't cross the streams.
Dr. Peter Venkman: Why?
Dr. Egon Spengler: It would be bad.
Dr. Peter Venkman: I'm fuzzy on the whole good/bad thing. What do you mean "bad"?
Dr. Egon Spengler: Try to imagine all life as you know it stopping instantaneously, and every molecule in your body exploding at the speed of light.
Dr. Raymond Stantz: Total protonic reversal!
Dr. Peter Venkman: Right, that's bad. Okay, alright, important safety tip, thanks Egon.


=D>
Goat buster's
I have a feeling they have know idea what they are talking about when they made those "technical" lines up

Me sleep now

Nicolas
2004-Nov-10, 06:04 PM
To A Thousand Pardons:

I made this more clear in another thread:

http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=332281&highlight=#332281

In short, the only planes bigger than the 747-400 are the spruce goose, which flew once, the antonov 255 which you see about never in life, the C-5 which isn't quite daily passing over either (maybe the An-124 too, I don't know, but I've never seen one of them neither). Now the airbus A360-600 is longer, but has less capacity, and flies only since recently. And all these planes are just percents bigger, no reason at all to me to call them "large" and the "747 "medium" (like some of them are double the size or more). It's the largest airliner in the world!! And I see them about daily, I've never seen any of the others mentioned, except for the A360-600. I said "until now" because I was thinking of the upcoming A380, which may eventually become a quite regular view in our skies.

Calling the 747 a medium sized object makes it sound like it's some kind of 70 seater regional jet, and that there are planes considerably larger. Anyway, when we (aerospace engineers) talk about a 747 we use words like "massive, huge, enormous". Medium-sized is the last thing we would come up with when comparing it to other planes (what the quote did)

I know you were joking about the "smallish object". But it made me think. Compare it to other moving objects. any object of these dimensions or this weight would be called large (as a single unit). Even with ships, that indeed get still a lot larger than the 747, a passenger ship which loads 600+ passengers would be called a considerably large passenger ship. (I knooooow, some carry thousands, so here medium would still be justified).

My whole point was that as an aerospace student it sounded like quite an understatement. Something like calling Nau Camp a medium-sized soccer stadium. There are bigger stadia, but still it remains huuuuuuuge (not that I'm further interested in soccer :) ).

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Nov-10, 08:40 PM
To A Thousand Pardons:

I made this more clear in another thread:

http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=332281&highlight=#332281

So that's where this came from. I was wondering why anyone would refer to a plane as an "object."


In short, the only planes bigger than the 747-400 are the spruce goose, which flew once, the antonov 255 which you see about never in life, the C-5 which isn't quite daily passing over either
Depends upon where you are at. Besides, did we say it had to be daily? :)

Poor Kebsis, I think we have missed their point.

Nicolas
2004-Nov-10, 10:33 PM
It depends indeed on where you are. Maybe I should have given the original thread from the beginning, so you could see the context. It was all about the idea of "people mistaking medium sized objects like the boeing 747 for much larger planes which are farther away"

If you see the An-225 daily, you're probably its pilot :D (HER pilot, all big vehicles are female in Russia, at least the soyuz is. Oh no that one was medium sized :roll: )

Lurker
2004-Nov-10, 10:43 PM
My favorite understatment....


Renault: What in heaven's name brought you to Casablanca?
Rick: My health. I came to Casablanca for the waters.
Renault: The waters? What waters? We're in the desert.
Rick: I was misinformed.

sarongsong
2004-Nov-11, 01:29 AM
...One I personally liked from my own interests:

(unintended understatement)
Someone referred to the Boeing 747 once as a
medium sized object

(it's about the largest plane you can possibly see flying overhead until now, and the very few ones that are larger aren't much larger)

I'd love to see other understatements!...
In the very same vein:
"That was close!"
said an unidentified voice on the [LAX] tower radio frequency, seconds after an Asiana Airlines Boeing 747, arriving from Korea, roared over a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 preparing to depart for Albuquerque ...The near collision at LAX was ultimately blamed on a controller who had just reported to work and mistakenly cleared the Southwest plane to take off from the runway on which the jumbo jet was about to land..."An accident was avoided not because of [the FAA's radar system] but because the Asiana flight crew was vigilant and saw Southwest on the runway," Rowlett said. "If the weather had been less than perfect, or had it been nighttime, we may have had a very different outcome."..."
Los Angeles Times (http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-runways10nov10,1,538442.story) November 10, 2004
(quoting extensively because registration may be required to access full story)

frogesque
2004-Nov-11, 02:41 AM
"Houston, we've had a problem here." Jack Swigert, Apollo 13, after a few minor problems (http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/SP-350/ch-13-1.html).

mid
2004-Nov-11, 10:00 AM
Someone referred to the Boeing 747 once as a
medium sized object

Bigger than a hydrogen atom, smaller than Jupiter, it sounds pretty medium to me.

Nicolas
2004-Nov-11, 10:25 AM
Oooooooooh THAT's what he meant with "medium" :D

Some years ago, a Belgian jetliner was flying at 10km when suddenly the cockpit windshield got bruised by a small meteorite (which is said to be found in the cockpit afterwards, but there is very little coverage of the event). The plane made an emergency dive to lower altitudes, and made an emergency landing. I think when the captain informed the cabin right after the dive, his message was just one big continuous understatement 8)

kucharek
2004-Nov-11, 10:36 AM
Obviously, a major malfunction has occurred.
-- Steve Nessbit, NASA PAO, when Challenger exploded[/quote]

teddyv
2004-Nov-12, 08:40 PM
One of my favorites in this catagory. . .


Dr. Egon Spengler: There's something very important I forgot to tell you.
Dr. Peter Venkman: What?
Dr. Egon Spengler: Don't cross the streams.
Dr. Peter Venkman: Why?
Dr. Egon Spengler: It would be bad.
Dr. Peter Venkman: I'm fuzzy on the whole good/bad thing. What do you mean "bad"?
Dr. Egon Spengler: Try to imagine all life as you know it stopping instantaneously, and every molecule in your body exploding at the speed of light.
Dr. Raymond Stantz: Total protonic reversal!
Dr. Peter Venkman: Right, that's bad. Okay, alright, important safety tip, thanks Egon.


=D>
Goat buster's
I have a feeling they have know idea what they are talking about when they made those "technical" lines up

Me sleep now

Love that movie. Slightly earlier too.

Ray: It's just occurred to me that we haven't had a completely successful test of the equipment.
Egon: I blame myself.
Peter: Me too.
Ray: Well, no sense worrying about it.
Peter: Why worry? Each one of us is wearing an unlicensed nuclear accelerator on our back.

Sigma_Orionis
2004-Nov-13, 01:05 AM
How about this one?



Dr. Peter Venkman: Ray, for a moment, pretend that I don't know anything about metallurgy, engineering or physics and just tell me what the hell is going on.
Dr. Raymond Stantz: You never studied.......

AGN Fuel
2004-Nov-13, 03:35 AM
A while ago, we had a Motor Racing driver here in Australia called Dick Johnson. One race, while doing about 300kph down a straight, his car threw a con-rod that blasted it's way through the head, taking out the distributor cap on the way through (yes, it was that long ago!). The car, with smoke & flames & oil pouring out of the bonnet, make an emergency stop beside the track.

Later at the pits, Johnson was asked what the problem had been. He smiled wryly & said, "Had a bit of a glitch with the distributor!"

Makgraf
2004-Nov-13, 11:52 PM
It'll take billions of years.

Are you sure? I remember reading somewhere that Triton could break up into a ring in as little as 100 million years.
You astronomers :D

swansont
2004-Nov-15, 11:57 AM
How about this one?



Dr. Peter Venkman: Ray, for a moment, pretend that I don't know anything about metallurgy, engineering or physics and just tell me what the hell is going on.
Dr. Raymond Stantz: You never studied.......


Back off, man. I'm a scientist.

teddyv
2004-Nov-17, 08:42 PM
Working in Ghana this past year and back in the 90's, if one our local workers can up to me or any other ex-pat and said,

"There's a small, small problem."

That meant something really bad has happened. It's now a joke in our office.