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jfribrg
2004-Nov-10, 02:42 PM
It has been about 400 years since we detected a supernova in the Milky Way. According to current thinking we should have had several occur since then. There is an assumption that they occurred but we just haven't noticed because most of the galaxy is obscured. However, if a Supernova does occur, will we be able to detect the neutrinos? My understanding is that a couple dozen neutrinos from SN1987A were detected. In that case, astronomers knew about the supernova and looked to see if the neutrinos had arrived as predicted. Could the reverse be true? We see some unexplained increase in neutrinos and infer the existence of an intra-galactic supernove. What else could be determined? Could we determine the type of SN or the distance?

Eroica
2004-Nov-10, 03:09 PM
Recent Thread (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=16639)

TriangleMan
2004-Nov-10, 05:08 PM
What else could be determined? Could we determine the type of SN or the distance?
Coincidentally enough I was reading about supernovas last night. From what I recall of the mechanisms for the various types of supernovas a certain amount of energy is released as neutrinos and it is possible to calculate that. I'm not sure though how accurate the calculations and if they're accurate enough to use a neutrino detector to determine the type of supernova.

I'm not sure how it would be used to detect distance. If you could accurately calculate the amount of neutrinos that would hit Earth from a supernova at distance X then you should be able to determine the distance based on the number of neutrinos.

Of course observing the source of neutrinos with a telescope and using redshifts would be a more reliable way to determine the distance. Spectroscopy can determine the type of supernova.

Eroica
2004-Nov-10, 05:20 PM
It has been about 400 years since we detected a supernova in the Milky Way. According to current thinking we should have had several occur since then. There is an assumption that they occurred but we just haven't noticed because most of the galaxy is obscured.
Young Close Supernova Remnant (http://cossc.gsfc.nasa.gov/epo/news/SNR.html)

jfribrg
2004-Nov-10, 06:09 PM
Of course observing the source of neutrinos with a telescope and using redshifts would be a more reliable way to determine the distance. Spectroscopy can determine the type of supernova.

If we could see it, then of course we would get better information by looking at it, but my thought was that since most intragalactic supernovae would not be visible, we would have to use some other method. My question was more along the lines of whether it would be possible to determine that an increased occurrance of neutrinos could be conclusively traced to a supernova in our galaxy. Are there any other ways of detecting a sn that is obscured by the galactic disk?