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Glom
2004-Nov-11, 05:44 PM
I've been reading Tunga's piece on the impending Ice Age (http://personals.galaxyinternet.net/tunga/IceAgeCometh.pdf) (pdf file).

When will the next supernova happen?

Should we lose sleep over it?

What can we do to weather the storm?

dgruss23
2004-Nov-11, 07:05 PM
What can we do to weather the storm?

Well, we could increase the levels of greenhouse gases like CO2 in the atmosphere ... but wait, there's not much evidence that CO2 increases lead to significant warming! :)

Bozola
2004-Nov-11, 07:25 PM
What can we do to weather the storm?

Well, we could increase the levels of greenhouse gases like CO2 in the atmosphere ... but wait, there's not much evidence that CO2 increases lead to significant warming! :)

Well, if it becomes a problem, we could all start eating more undercooked beans - methane is a known greenhouse gas.

eburacum45
2004-Nov-11, 08:04 PM
The on-going long term sequestration of CO2 into sedimentary rocks will mean that the overall temperature of the Earth may decrease over the next few tens of millions of years;
after a period the gradually warming Sun will warm the Earth up again, and we will have a temperate period before the Earth gets too hot to inhabit (by about 1 gigayear from now).

However all these effects should be controllable if we learn enough about terraforming in the interim period; eventually, we will have to accept defeat and go and live out on Triton or Pluto, when the sun goes red giant...

then we will be living in the
Delayed Gratification Habitable Zone (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=145778 80&dopt=Abstract)

Glom
2004-Nov-11, 10:40 PM
Set the CO2 free!

pghnative
2004-Nov-11, 10:55 PM
Set the CO2 free!Hey, I thought you were the one who started the sequestration thread (think of the saplings!). You know, the one that derailed into talking about conservation, oil flares and the benefits of living near a hydroelectric dam (salmon be darned).

Glom
2004-Nov-11, 11:01 PM
My position was that sequestration was stupid as it steals CO2 from the plants. Hence I want people to think of the poor sapling that will suffer from CO2 being stolen.

pghnative
2004-Nov-11, 11:04 PM
Ah...now I get it. That thread derailed so quickly that I missed your point.

Evan
2004-Nov-12, 07:59 AM
If you will recall, my first reply on that thread was about how mismanagement was and is responsible for the loss of thousands of square kilometers of trees in the last two years alone here. Also, we don't usually build dams on salmon rivers here. The entire Fraser river is undammed including it's tributaries (except one). One major exception was the damming of a river in southern BC. That was at the insistence of the US, paid for by the US and the electricity sent to the US. Just this last week after years of intensive effort by BC Hydro they reported record numbers of salmon returning. Amazing video, the river was full of fish.

Now, just what is this thread about, exactly?

Sheki
2004-Nov-12, 03:50 PM
Evan wrote:


Also, we don't usually build dams on salmon rivers here.

By "here" I hope you meant "BC" rather than "Canada".

See:
http://www.mactaquaccountry.com/mactaquacdam.html

One of three (IIRC) dams on the Saint John River.

The Saint John River is/was a major atlantic salmon river. In recognition, the dam operates the most peculiar conservation program that I can readily recall. They have a salmon capture system to grab all of the spawners. They then load the spawners in trucks and cart them up above the head pond (100 km) to release them at the spawning grounds. The resulting smolts are then expected to travel back out to sea (downstream and across the headpond) from the spawning grounds by either going over the spillway or through the turbines. :P :-?

Luckily, there is a hatchery/captive salmon breeding facility below the dam. #-o

Sheki

Evan
2004-Nov-12, 04:20 PM
I do mean BC. The Fraser river is over 1000 miles long and has quite a few major tributaries, as yet undammed. It is the most important salmon river in the world. The pressure to dam it is going to be intense in the future. It has flow rates as high as 11,000 cubic meters per second and numerous excellent locations for dams. If dammed it could supply many gigawatts of power.

Sheki
2004-Nov-12, 04:30 PM
Evan:

Excellent. Good luck! However, those are just those crazy Pacific salmon...so they don't count anyway =; :lol:


In the hopes of getting the thread back on track, I believe we are still waiting for someone in the know to illuminate us with respect to when we can expect the next supernova...


Sheki

Bozola
2004-Nov-12, 04:57 PM
Evan:

In the hopes of getting the thread back on track, I believe we are still waiting for someone in the know to illuminate us with respect to when we can expect the next supernova...

Sheki

I broke the hidden message in the Bible Code (http://www.hotrodscustomstuff.com/Cars/Dove's%20Nova/Super%20Chevy%2003-03.jpg). It said quite clearly to expect one three weeks next thursday. Start hitting the lima beans now, boys.

Evan
2004-Nov-12, 06:50 PM
It appears the best cadidate in our neck of the woods is Eta Carinae (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/newsdesk/archive/releases/1996/23/). But, it is 8000 LY distant so would not likely pose a threat. I'm not too impressed by the Marusek paper. It presents much as fact that is really supposition.

Tunga
2004-Nov-15, 04:54 AM
Glom writes


I've been reading Tunga's piece on the impending Ice Age (pdf file).

When will the next supernova happen?

As an educated guess, within the next 800 years. The Earth has experienced a cycle of Global Cooling Events approximately 1500 years apart. This cycle is also observed to track Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) flux changes.
http://www.co2science.org/edit/v4_edit/v4n48edit.htm


Should we lose sleep over it?
Don't get an ulcer! Be aware of the threat! Keep an ear out for neutrinos. Be prepared to act expeditiously if a threat materializes!



What can we do to weather the storm?
http://personals.galaxyinternet.net/tunga/SDPP.pdf
After losing a little sleep over it, this is the best plan I could come up with. It's still a work in progress.

Even though the Earth's magnetic field strength has been in rapid decline, it is still fairly strong. At present, the Earth's magnetic field will clamp down the effects of a Global Cooling Event before it can drive the Earth back into a glacial period. But the initial surge of GCR can still be quite nasty.

Evan
2004-Nov-15, 06:09 AM
I will sleep well regardless....