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Kalopin
2013-Feb-26, 10:28 PM
"The Upper Mid-land Drift", "The Upland Formation", "The Upland Complex", "The New Madrid Lines" are the most common names used to describe the highly unusual topography of The Mississippi Embayment.

Currently the most common accepted theories to create such design include an ice sheet to somehow pull the land upward, against gravity and away from the equator and/or inland seas came up to form evenly spaced rolling hills, but left no sandy beaches. But, there is another, slightly different hypothesis. Could this unusual "upward" design be a shockwave pattern from the effects of a bolide impact?

A quick description of how this appears to me:
On satellite, put the upper embayment in view. Draw an imaginary line down the middle of The New Madrid Bend straight to Northeastern Marshall County, Mississippi. Notice the lines in the topography showing the angle, direction, and force of impact. Follow each river to the north [Wolf, Hatchie, Loosahatchie,...] down each of their valleys to view the larger waves from a shock that extends from The Tennessee River on the east around passed The St. Francis River on the west. All the semi-circular fractures and "sand blows" point to this structure. The man-made lakes to the south [Arkabutla, Sardis, Enid,...] is where the land was split apart and pulled upward, later blocked by earthen dams to form lakes. Every river, lake, hill, valley, and every detail surrounds and points directly to this same central location.

What could have formed this design? If this is accurate, do you realize the implications? The main reason- to find the truth. Would anyone know of someone that may have an interest in collecting all the complex geological data [LiDAR, spectrometers, microscopes, core samples,...] to verify these findings? If you may have an interest in furthering this investigation, it will be greatly appreciated.

http://koolkreations.wix.com/kalopins-legacy ,
"Kalopins Legacy","wix","documents and links", and please read the article entitled "A Few Comments on 1811".

Do you see the shockwave pattern?

Thanks!

dgavin
2013-Feb-26, 11:25 PM
Actually the common accepted explaination for the New Madrid area is that it was a failed rift zone, from 750 mil years ago when the contients started separating again.

It's known as the Reelfoot Rift.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Madrid_Seismic_Zone

Before even jumping to you web site, I'd wonder why you think that the accepted explaination might not be adaquate.

John Mendenhall
2013-Feb-27, 12:08 AM
Actually the common accepted explaination for the New Madrid area is that it was a failed rift zone, from 750 mil years ago when the contients started separating again.

It's known as the Reelfoot Rift.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Madrid_Seismic_Zone

Before even jumping to you web site, I'd wonder why you think that the accepted explaination might not be adaquate.

Yes, the nature of the Reelfoot Rift seems well established. Thanks for the link, dgavin.

PetersCreek
2013-Feb-27, 01:03 AM
Kalopin,

You had your chance at this ATM subject in the thread, "A Theory of Cometary Associations with Earthquakes (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php?130033-A-Theory-of-Cometary-Associations-with-Earthquakes)". This thread is therefore closed. In order to revisit this subject, you must have significant new evidence to present and you must clear it with the moderation team. If allowed to continue, this discussion will be moved to the Against The Mainstream forum, where the original discussion took place. Please report this post to explain any new evidence you may have.

I have also deactivated your link because it contains an up-front solicitation to "get a copy" of your book. If you wish to make specific, supporting references to your site, you should provide links that take visitors directly to the content you reference. However, you may not make an ATM argument by telling members to go read entire documents on your site. You must present your case here, on this forum.