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Argos
2004-Nov-15, 02:27 PM
Rodeos (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rodeo)(*) are very popular in the area I live, but they are being banned all around. People are divided on the question, and the battle for the hearts and minds is far from over. I personally tend to support the banning.

Do you think rodeos are a legitimate folk lore expression (and an exciting sport) or an unnecessary suffering inflicted on animals? Would you like to share your thoughts about the question?

(*) This Wikipedia link ignores a whole rodeo tradition in the southern hemisphere, but itīs useful as a definition.

Gmann
2004-Nov-15, 02:45 PM
Do you think rodeos are a legitimate folk lore expression (and an exciting sport) or an unnecessary suffering inflicted on animals?

I believe it's an unnecessary suffering episode inflicted on a poor defensless animal. Imagine the mind of a man who straps a poor, hapless Cowboy on the back of a 2,000 Lb. bull. Although, in a strange way, the Cowboy does seem to like it. The southwest US has always been a mystery to me. :D

TriangleMan
2004-Nov-15, 02:46 PM
Rodeos are alive and well in Western Canada and I can't see Calgary ever cancelling the Calgary Stampede, Canada's biggest rodeo. I've seen rodeos numerous times and they're a lot of fun. Animal rights concerns have not resulted in any scaling-back of rodeos there.

(for the record I was well aware of the rodeo tradition in the southern hemisphere, especially in Argentina :) )

Humphrey
2004-Nov-15, 02:47 PM
I have no problem. It's a fun sport and under my undertsanding, other then the killings down south during some events like the running of the bulls, no animals are intentionally harmed.

TriangleMan
2004-Nov-15, 02:54 PM
Do you think rodeos are a legitimate folk lore expression (and an exciting sport) or an unnecessary suffering inflicted on animals? Would you like to share your thoughts about the question?

Forgot to address this point.

Rodeo events derived from legitimate skills needed to work in ranching. Roping animals and horseback riding are a fact of life in ranching so I don't see a problem in demonstrating those skills. Yes, these events can stress an animal but where do we draw the line in ensuring animals live "stress-free" lives. Don't wild animals live lives filled with stress?

Also, it is ranching, in the end we are going to eat those animals you know (well, maybe not the horses). Mmmmmmm beef.

Argos
2004-Nov-15, 03:07 PM
Rodeos are alive and well in Western Canada and I can't see Calgary ever cancelling the Calgary Stampede, Canada's biggest rodeo. I've seen rodeos numerous times and they're a lot of fun. Animal rights concerns have not resulted in any scaling-back of rodeos there.

(for the record I was well aware of the rodeo tradition in the southern hemisphere, especially in Argentina :) )

Yes. But they are - exceedingly - popular in all the "south cone" (Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay). The biggest Brazilian rodeo, in the town of Barretos, attracts 1,000,000 people over a week. This page (http://www.barretoscountryhotel.com.br/festa_peao.html)(portug) can give an idea. That arena can accomodate 150,000 people

SeanF
2004-Nov-15, 03:45 PM
When my wife and I honeymooned in Mexico a couple years ago, we went to a bullfight - a real bullfight, if you know what I mean.

Not something I'd go out of my way to see again, but I don't begrudge myself the experience.

One of the bullfighters got himself messed up enough that he couldn't finish off the bull and another guy had to take over. :o

Laser Jock
2004-Nov-15, 06:19 PM
When my wife and I honeymooned in Mexico a couple years ago, we went to a bullfight - a real bullfight, if you know what I mean.

Not something I'd go out of my way to see again, but I don't begrudge myself the experience.

One of the bullfighters got himself messed up enough that he couldn't finish off the bull and another guy had to take over. :o

Bullfighting and rodeos are two very different things. I have only watched bullfighting on TV, but I was disgusted by it. However, as others have pointed out, the animals in rodeo are not intentionally harmed. Banning rodeos is silly and unnecessary. Bullfighting ... that's a seperate issue.

Of course the fact that I grew up less than a half-mile from the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame (http://www.hellocoloradosprings.com/specialplaces/prorodeo/prorodeo.htm) has nothing to do with my opinion. :wink:

Spacewriter
2004-Nov-15, 06:26 PM
I have no problem with rodeos. They do, as pointed out, emphasize skills still in need on some ranches.

tlbs101
2004-Nov-15, 10:35 PM
As two before me have pointed out; Rodeo is a gathering of cowboys (those that would handle cattle on the open range, and within ranches) to compete to see who is the best at the skills they use in their work.

It is a true athletic competition, just as the Olympics is, or any other sporting competition. It just happens to involve animals, because the athletic skill sets involve animals.

No animals are intentionally killed (although it happens very rarely), and other than a few minutes of discomfort, no animals are even intentionally harmed (again, except for rare accidents).

To the contrary, many rodeo competitors have been killed in the arena. This is another thing that distinguishes rodeo from most other sports competitions.

One final note: North American bull fighting is non-lethal to the bull, and sometimes very lethal to the human competitor. North American bull fighting is mainly about how close the bull fighter can come to the bull and not get gored, and how well the bull fighter can force the bull to attack.

I have watched rodeo competitions in the past, and enjoyed them.

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Nov-16, 02:20 AM
However, as others have pointed out, the animals in rodeo are not intentionally harmed.
By "harmed," you mean, killed?

worzel
2004-Nov-16, 02:49 AM
Bull Fighting I'm definately against. But I think the issue of the hundreds of thousands of animals now living a life of nothing but suffering in the name of cheap food is more important.

Rodeos I'm pretty ignorant about. Are the skills displayed in rodeos still widely used in the countries where rodeos are popular? And the follow on question, do cattle farmed in these countries still live a pretty natural life? If so then maybe there's a good animal rights argument for rodeos.

Doe, John
2004-Nov-16, 03:09 AM
most of the skills demonstrated are usefull for working cowboys, for example "heading and heeling" aka team roping, steer wrestling, steer roping etc. Although advances in the technology of portable corrals and chutes reduce the necessity of these skills. However some of the more popular events ie bull riding have no redeeming value except for the fact that they are a blast to watch. Bareback and saddle bronc riding are also events pretty much made up for the rodeo, but I know for a fact that those animals are bred for the task. My sister-in-law unknowingly bought a bucking horse at auction. Nicest, most well-behaved horse she had ever handled . . . until she swung up in the saddle. "I went 2.7 seconds on a bull named Fu Manchu" (Tim McGraw)

Krevel
2004-Nov-16, 03:10 AM
I wonder if people are generally aware that bulls and broncos in rodeos 'buck' because of the strap that is placed around their midsection, applying pressure to their kidneys. This strap is plainly obvious if you know where to look - just behind the ribs of the animal.

Now, I'm an omnivore and a hunter; so I'm hardly what you would call an animal rights activist, and frankly, I'm not hugely concerned with rodeos. But I don't think that you can consider rodeos to be a form of benign entertainment. If you are a fan of rodeo, you should at least consider the obvious suffering to which these animal are subjected.

Edit added: I should also point out that my great-grandfather was gored to death by a bull, and so there is some antipathy toward bulls in my family. Of course, he was 96 at the time....

sarongsong
2004-Nov-16, 04:40 AM
And let's not overlook their buckle-bunnies (http://www.grandnationalrodeo.com/)! :lol:

Doe, John
2004-Nov-17, 12:11 AM
And let's not overlook their buckle-bunnies (http://www.grandnationalrodeo.com/)! :lol:Yeeah, but you gotta jump off after 8 seconds. :oops:

gethen
2004-Nov-17, 02:22 AM
Not a rodeo fan here. Run those calves into a big pen, chase them around on horseback, throw them onto their backs and tie their feet together. Jump on the back of a bull, dig at him with your spurs, and then act surprized when you fall off and he comes after you. I hate to say this, but I've been married for 30+ years to a veterinarian who deals strictly with cattle, and he also hates rodeos. Why terrorize or injure animals for entertainment's sake?
Read this entire article (http://www.upc-online.org/avma/welfare_policy.html) if you haven't heard enough.
Sorry for the soapbox, but this is an animal welfare issue, and I take it quite seriously.

hdram225
2004-Nov-17, 06:19 AM
I am actually a vegetarian, but dont really have a problem with rodeos. I heard somewhere(not sure where now) that bulls used in bull fighting are really well treated outside of the rodeo....have the best life a cow can have. and once he is retired from the rodeo, he is put out to stud. now what bull could complain to that retirement? again...I dont know if that is all true or not. Bull fighting is a different story. that makes me sick to my stomach. esspecially how so many people seem to think its so honorable and brave to be a bull fighter. really makes me sick.