PDA

View Full Version : Odd ball stars



glen chapman
2004-Nov-15, 11:10 PM
Does anyone know of a list, or know some examples of stars that seem not to behaving to current stella modeling on evolution.

I'm not interested in the big bad arse extreme stars like the Pistol and Eta Carina, but more your garden variety stella population that refuses to follow the theory

Thanks in advance

tofu
2004-Nov-15, 11:16 PM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/2983298.stm

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=9730

JohnW
2004-Nov-16, 03:53 PM
If you're willing to spend some money, or have access to a decent library, check out James Kaler's Extreme Stars.

TriangleMan
2004-Nov-16, 05:29 PM
Magnetars (http://science.msfc.nasa.gov/newhome/headlines/ast20may98_1.htm) are a weird type of star that you should look at as well, though I think astronomers are getting a pretty good handle on how they develop.

dgavin
2004-Nov-16, 06:20 PM
V383 Mon was a star very similar in size and color to our own sun, it was estimated at around .92 Sol Mass.

Like our sun it had a period of cyclic variability, the major difference was it's vartience was around 11% every seven years, to Sol's 2% every 11 years.

V383 Mon did something totaly outside the normal theroies reguarding stellar evolution.

It went from a Yellow Dwarf to a full Red Giant, in under Six Months. Current Theroies say this should take around a 100,000 to a million years to happen.

There are some excelent pictures of this on hubble site.

It is unknown what caused the star to evolve so rapidly, but my personal guess is it had more heavy elements in it's core during origional formation, and these can depending on mass, speed up how fast a star trastions once it's fuel runs out.

Kullat Nunu
2004-Nov-16, 07:10 PM
V383 Mon was a star very similar in size and color to our own sun, it was estimated at around .92 Sol Mass.

Maybe. But it may have a companion star of class B3 V (http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0407141), which are much more massive and shorter-lived than our Sun. It makes possible that V383 Mon was actually a massive supergiant already before the outburst. Really strange star in any case.


There are some excelent pictures of this on hubble site.

Here (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/newsdesk/archive/releases/2003/10/). It is one of the best Hubble shots ever.

Tom Mazanec
2004-Nov-17, 12:52 PM
Have the woo-woos panicked about the sun becoming a Red Giant in six months yet?