PDA

View Full Version : Bad Gastronomy, Mk II



PetersCreek
2013-Apr-15, 07:10 PM
I can't seem to find my old thread anywhere, so here's another where folks can post their gastronomical endeavors, good or bad.

The past couple of weekends have seen me back in the kitchen (and driveway) curing meat and making sausage. Last weekend, I put a whole pork loin into cure. It's got a little less than two weeks to go before it's Canadian bacon. Once again, apologies to our Canadian friends for using the American term for something very different than their Canadian bacon. :D

I spent a good portion of Saturday morning grinding, mixing, and stuffing summer sausages before putting them in a warm place to incubate for 24 hours:

http://www.brettluna.com/img/s9/v88/p1538059154-2.jpg (http://www.brettluna.com/img/s9/v88/p1538059154-4.jpg)

I set the smoker up in the driveway on Sunday and about 9 hours later, it's summer sausage...7 pounds of mahogany-colored, hickory-smoked summer sausage...even though it's nowhere near summer in Alaska yet:

http://www.brettluna.com/img/s9/v87/p1537824988-2.jpg (http://www.brettluna.com/img/s9/v87/p1537824988-4.jpg)

I would have done all this last weekend too but I didn't realize I was out of bacterial starter culture, which I can only get by mail order.

Swift
2013-Apr-15, 08:48 PM
http://www.animateit.net/data/media/august2009/drool.gif

LookingSkyward
2013-Apr-16, 09:00 AM
Concur with Swift!

PetersCreek
2013-Oct-12, 02:42 PM
Two things this furlough has given me more time to do: home improvement and cooking. Dinner last night was schnitzel & brown sauce, sptzle, and glazed baby carrots. Today will be more ambitious. As if laying the last of the bedroom tile isn't enough, I'll also be making boeuf bourguignon. Yes, Julia Childs' boeuf bourguignon.

Noclevername
2013-Oct-12, 09:50 PM
Looks delicious! Also, Swift has the best smilies.

Buttercup
2013-Oct-12, 10:15 PM
Yes, those do look delicious. Unfortunately I'd have to skip them. :cry:

PetersCreek
2013-Oct-13, 03:19 AM
As mentioned, here's a big helping of Boeuf Bourguignon from Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child, over rustic potato mash. I've only made this perhaps a half-dozen times. Quite tasty.

http://www.brettluna.com/img/s9/v94/p959453141-2.jpg

Noclevername
2013-Oct-13, 04:22 AM
*Falsetto voice*: Bon Apetit!

swampyankee
2013-Oct-13, 05:34 PM
Scallop scampi. Reasonably successful, but I think it would have been better with some red pepper flakes and thyme.

slang
2013-Oct-14, 12:12 AM
Two things this furlough has given me more time to do: home improvement and cooking.

Hah, a year ago, but I soooo recognize it :) During my umm.. medical furlough, I made Bapao, Pangsit Pedis, Atjar Tjampur, Sambal goreng, Hot sauce, and several other things I'd never made before. Quitting smoking didn't help with the cooking virus.... :)

Looks like a tasty plate, PM me a helping, will yah? :)

Tobin Dax
2013-Oct-15, 08:25 PM
I should know better than to open this thread when I need to go get lunch. Looks good, Peter's Creek. Especially the summer sausage.

PetersCreek
2014-Oct-20, 01:21 AM
After months of meaning to get around to it, I finally made my first attempt at home made pretzels, complete with a dip in a hot lye solution:

http://www.brettluna.com/img/s1/v56/p908077730-11.jpg (http://www.brettluna.com/img/s1/v56/p908077730-4.jpg)

I was trying to replicate the pretzels I loved in southern Germany. While the shape isn't quite right, the flavor is very close. I'll be making these again. After all, I've got plenty of lye.

The Backroad Astronomer
2014-Oct-21, 05:26 PM
better not lye around too long.

PetersCreek
2014-Oct-21, 06:05 PM
If you have a better solution, don't leave me twisting.

Spacedude
2014-Oct-21, 09:54 PM
Dang, dinner is still 30 minutes away and now my stomach has gone into grumbling overdrive.
Looks Too Good!!!

PetersCreek
2015-Feb-15, 04:47 AM
Tonight's Valentine dinner was our traditional surf and turf: oven roasted filet mignon with Alaskan snow crab and Barnaise sauce, creamy Parmesan polenta, spinach salad with pecans and cranberries, and a 2009 Harvest Select Riesling from Chateau Ste. Michelle.

I was more pleased with the filet tonight than usual. Instead of searing first, then roasting to the desired doneness, I reversed the order with a long rest between so the interior didn't cook much further while searing. The result was a gorgeous medium rare, pretty much from sear to sear. This is a method I read about online and have wanted to try for a while. I do recommend it.

Inclusa
2015-Feb-15, 07:31 AM
Would you call this "recipe" yummy or weird?
Almond milk (the unsweetened version for sure)
A can of sardines (the ones in spring water; but it is still somewhat oily).
Crushed tigernuts and hazelnuts

Boil it or heat it with the oven for a while.

Have anyone used canned sardines for soup?

Hypmotoad
2015-Mar-13, 04:15 PM
Southern Fried Cabbage

6 slices of bacon

Chopped onion (any flavor will do)

Tsp Salt Tsp Pepper (however much makes you happy actually)

Head of cabbage (sliced, chopped, and stabbed)

Place bacon in pot and fried to desired crispness

Add a bit of oil later if need (may not need any)

Pinch of sugar if like.

Add all to pot and fry till you are drooling (shouldn't need to for more than 10 minutes or so)

Pig Out!

NEOWatcher
2015-Mar-13, 04:42 PM
... Add noodles and you have Haluski.

Then there is what I grew up as flicky (flee-chkey) that I can't find on the web prepared the way we had it.

Grind up a cottage ham.
Mix with eggs and partially cooked square noodles (the noodle shape is important, it determines the texture. 1/2 inch squares, although I've seen some people succeed by crushing egg noodles)
Bake until the outside is crispy

Serve with applesauce.
Green beans is a good side dish.

PetersCreek
2015-Mar-13, 04:44 PM
Add a bit of cider vinegar and some rye caraway seeds and you'll have something close to a German style fried cabbage.

NEOWatcher
2015-Mar-13, 05:07 PM
Add a bit of cider vinegar and some rye seeds and you'll have something close to a German style fried cabbage.
I assume you mean caraway seeds?
That's more of a Slavic dish and a very common side dish (Moravske Zeli). Although, I think using red cabbage brings it a bit more toward the Germanic regions.

It's also part of the traditional czech meal Vepřo-knedlo-zelo. (Pork, dumplings and [sweet or sour] cabbage)

PetersCreek
2015-Mar-13, 05:23 PM
Yep, caraway seeds. That's what I meant. Slip of the grey matter, that's all.

PetersCreek
2015-Mar-13, 05:28 PM
Although, I think using red cabbage brings it a bit more toward the Germanic regions.

Yes, if one is making Rotkohl. I haven't often had it with caraway but it's common with or without apples included. Some recipes are also a bit heavy on 'pie spices' (cinnamon, allspice, etc.) for my liking. My recipe needs a bit more tweaking.

NEOWatcher
2015-Mar-13, 05:46 PM
Some recipes are also a bit heavy on 'pie spices' (cinnamon, allspice, etc.) for my liking.
I don't know about "pie spices", but I have often experienced it with too much clove.

Hypmotoad
2015-Mar-13, 05:50 PM
Working offshore, running anchors for pipe-laying barges, it is easy to go for weeks without being able to cook meals on a tug. In which case we would often come along side of the barge and pick up evening meals for the crew as they were stable enough to cook despite sea conditions most of the time.

Cabbage soups were meals we could cook though, in large covered pots so as to avoid splashing it everywhere. Add in microwaved sausage, onions, pretty much whatever else you could and you could eat pretty well almost anytime. Some Zaterain's crab boil to spice it up, toast or crackers...pretty good stuff.

PetersCreek
2015-Mar-13, 05:55 PM
Yes, clove is another that's all to easy to overdo for my taste.

'Pie spice' is a catchall term I use for clove, allspice, cinnamon, nutmeg, mace, and the like. An old quirk of mine based on the grocery store premixed spices that contain various combinations thereof.

NEOWatcher
2015-Mar-13, 06:17 PM
'Pie spice' is a catchall term I use for clove, allspice, cinnamon, nutmeg, mace, and the like. An old quirk of mine based on the grocery store premixed spices that contain various combinations thereof.
Pumpkin pie spice is usually the only combination spice I have. Simply because it's a combination I hardly ever use (except for the cinnamon), and keeping individual spices for them would be too much. Maybe "italian seasoning", but I don't notice too much difference in taste to regular oregano. I get what's available.

The reason for my questioning the clove was that I didn't expect it to be in it. I just checked mine, and it contains what you said, but not the clove.

I've never seen the use for "garlic salt". Way to much salt and not enough garlic. Only "garlic powder" for me (although that's only for a quick dash. I usually keep peeled cloves in the freezer)

PetersCreek
2015-Mar-13, 07:04 PM
...and keeping individual spices for them would be too much.

You should see our spice cabinet. It's a monument of excess. My wife and I are both spice junkies and are 'fortunate' enough to have a spice and tea shop in town to feed our habit.


The reason for my questioning the clove was that I didn't expect it to be in it. I just checked mine, and it contains what you said, but not the clove.

It needn't be in any particular blend for me to call it a pie spice. There are several kinds out there and if the spice fits the profile, I'll lump it in with them.


I've never seen the use for "garlic salt". Way to much salt and not enough garlic. Only "garlic powder" for me (although that's only for a quick dash. I usually keep peeled cloves in the freezer)

I agree with regard to the supermarket brands but for convenience, we do use a seasoned garlic blend from our spice shop. And while I'm a big fan of fresh garlic (the keeper jar always has a fresh head in it) I also keep both granulated and powdered garlic on hand for making blends and rubs of my own.

schlaugh
2015-Mar-14, 07:00 PM
Brett, you started this thread a couple of years ago discussing Canadian bacon and summer sausage, Got any recipes you can share? Or sites you like for recipes? I've just started making my own sausage (probably on a much smaller scale than you) and I'm always looking for suggestions.

JohnD
2015-Mar-14, 10:07 PM
A friend served me Pheasant, lightly stewed with vegetables.
Mmmmmmmmmmmmmm!

I commented favourably, saying in particular that I had not crunched on a single shot gun pellet!
"Of course not. It was road kill."

THAT was Bad Gastronomy.
JOhn

Trebuchet
2015-Mar-14, 10:19 PM
A friend served me Pheasant, lightly stewed with vegetables.
Mmmmmmmmmmmmmm!

I commented favourably, saying in particular that I had not crunched on a single shot gun pellet!
"Of course not. It was road kill."

THAT was Bad Gastronomy.
JOhn

You've just reminded me of the road kill episode of Doc Martin!

PetersCreek
2015-Mar-15, 08:45 PM
Brett, you started this thread a couple of years ago discussing Canadian bacon and summer sausage, Got any recipes you can share? Or sites you like for recipes? I've just started making my own sausage (probably on a much smaller scale than you) and I'm always looking for suggestions.

Books:


Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing (http://www.amazon.com/Charcuterie-Salting-Smoking-Revised-Updated-ebook/dp/B00CF2MBB2/ref=sr_1_15?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1426449960&sr=1-15&keywords=sausage) by Michael Ruhlman — I mention this book because it was the one that got me started. It doesn't treat the subject in depth but has some breadth without being overwhelming. It does "cheat" a couple of recipes, like summer sausage...more on that below.

Great Sausage Recipes and Meat Curing (http://www.amazon.com/Great-Sausage-Recipes-Meat-Curing/dp/0025668609/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1426449933&sr=1-4&keywords=sausage) by Rytek Kutas — more than any other, this is my sausage making bible. More than recipes, it goes into some history, the equipment, quite a bit of food science, and even the business of making sausage. In fact, the recipe quantities are more for the small commercial kitchen but they can be scaled.

The Art of Making Fermented Sausages (http://www.amazon.com/Art-Making-Fermented-Sausages/dp/0982426712/ref=sr_1_16?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1426449960&sr=1-16&keywords=sausage) by Stanley Marianski and Adam Marianski — This is the book to have for making sausage with live cultures, including summer sausage. The Ruhlman book offers a recipe using Fermento (a milk-derived powder) to approximate the tanginess usually provided by a bacterial culture. Sure, it's quicker and results are pretty good but it's not traditional and it's not great.

Websites:


The Sausage Maker, Inc. (SausageMaker.com) (http://www.sausagemaker.com/) — One of my main sources for quality equipment and supplies. They also manufacture their own lines of equipment, such as smokers, grinders, and stuffers. I have one of their stuffers and the quality is superb.

Butcher & Packer (Butcher-Packer.com) (http://www.butcher-packer.com/) — My #2 online source for all things sausage making.

Cabela's (Cabelas.com) (http://www.cabelas.com/catalog/browse/_/N-1101292?WTz_l=SBC%3BMMcat104798880) — Hunters make up a significant segment of sausage makers (especially here in Alaska) and being the "World's Foremost Outfitter" it's no surprise that Cabela's has a robust selection of food processing supplies. I mailordered my meat slicer and a few other things from them and when they finally (!) opened a store here, I bought my new smoker during their first big sale.

Homemade Sausages (lpoli.50webs.com/) (http://lpoli.50webs.com/) — Len Poli offers a rich resource including hundreds of recipes. Yes, hundreds.

My summer sausage recipe is based on the one found in the Marianski book above. I'll give you the basics of my Canadian bacon recipe in my next post.

Trebuchet
2015-Mar-15, 09:06 PM
I was thinking of starting a new thread, but I guess this is reasonably relevant here:
I like horseradish. The kind that cleans out your sinuses and makes your eyes water. Can anyone suggest a favorite brand? Preferably from USA supermarkets? We've been using Beaver brand "Extra Hot", but it's just not doing it for me any more.

schlaugh
2015-Mar-15, 09:23 PM
Thank you Brett! I have some reading to do. :)

PetersCreek
2015-Mar-15, 10:02 PM
Brett, you started this thread a couple of years ago discussing Canadian bacon and summer sausage, Got any recipes you can share?

Canadian bacon was my 'gateway drug' to charcuterie. It doesn't require exotic ingredients, special equipment, or advanced techniques. Mostly, it just takes basic kitchen savvy and time. But first, the requisite words on food safety:

Disclaimer: This process entails the handling of raw meat products and storing them unfrozen for long periods. Failing to correctly execute the instructions below and/or follow commonly accepted safe food handling practices may expose you to the risk of serious food-borne illness. Additionally, the curing product used contains nitrites and nitrates. Those with medical conditions rendering them sensitive to such products, may wish to consult a physician prior to consuming them. So, undertake this endeavor at your own risk. The author accepts no liability for your ham-related misfortune, be it by design, negligence, happenstance, or divine providence.

I start with a vac-pac boneless pork loin available at your local grocery, Sam's Club, or Costco. If you have a ready source of reasonably-priced fresh cut pork loins, by all means, grab it. Fresh is always better. My first attempt was actually a tenderloin. It was a smaller and less expensive learning experience.

Ingredients:


Whole pork loin
Morton Tender Quick (http://www.mortonsalt.com/products/meatcuring/tenderquick.html) — available from most well stocked supermarkets
Brown sugar

Optionally, one or more of the following:


Maple syrup
Allspice
Cayenne or other spices to taste

Equipment:


Smoker — optionally you can use wood chips in a grill capable of indirect cooking at consistent low temperatures...or a household oven with no smoke.
Kitchen scale

Optional Equipment:


Vacuum sealer
Elastic meat netting
Netting stuffer
Meat slicer

Preparation:


Remove most of the surface fat and all of the visible silver skin (http://www.recipetips.com/glossary-term/t--38018/silverskin.asp) that you can. Divide it into manageable, equally-sized pieces...usually two to four for a good size loin. Weigh each piece individually and jot it down.

The cure is applied as a dry rub. For each piece of meat to be rubbed, measure 1/2 ounce (or 1 Tbsp) per pound (34 g per kg). I don't mix the TQ with anything else before rubbing. Due to the grain and weight difference between TQ, brown sugar. and other dry goods, using a mix will leave you in the dark about just how much TQ is going where. So, I apply the TQ first, using a fine mesh shaker, taking care to get the TQ evenly onto every surface and into every nook and cranny. I then follow up with an equal amount of brown sugar or more, as need to coat the meat.

Once the cure is applied, I vacuum seal the meat and toss it into the fridge. You can use a zip lock if you don't have a vac but you'll have to turn the bag periodically to redistribute the cure-laden liquid that will be drawn out of the meat. Make sure your fridge keeps the meat at 36-to-40F (2-4C). Warmer, and you're leaving the safe zone. Colder, and you'll slow down the curing process.

Here's where patience comes in. I cure my CB for up three weeks. A lot of recipes call for 3, 5, or 6 days or so but on the advice of a fellow smoker, I've gone for the long haul. IMO, the tenderness, texture, and mouth feel are much better with a longer cure. If I'm in a real hurry, I'll take it out after two weeks.

I often add maple syrup (the real thing, please) during the last third of the curing period...just enough to coat. I've also added various spices and seasonings, like onion and/or garlic powder. But like I said, simply-cured and well-smoked pork stands on it's own very well.

When it's finally time to remove the CB from the cure, thoroughly (and repeatedly) rinse and soak it in cold water for an hour. If you don't take the time here, your CB could turn out too salty. Inspect your meat for off odors and color. It should be an attractive rosy color. Of course, if you use brown sugar and/or maple syrup, some brownness is to be expected. It should have a fresh, rich, meaty smell. Foul odors and/or gray/green spots are indications that your cure failed. When in doubt...any doubt...chuck it.

Pat dry and truss your loin to maintain a rounded shape. You can use butcher's twine, tied every 2-4 inches or you can use elastic sausage/ham netting (http://www.sausagemaker.com/13502andnbsp14nettingroll.aspx), as I do. Then it's back into the fridge so it can air dry for a bit, to form a skin-like pellicle. I like to leave it overnight but if I'm in a hurry, I'll cheat it down to a couple of hours.


http://www.brettluna.com/img/s1/v56/p1166689224-11.jpg
Click to enlarge (http://www.brettluna.com/img/s1/v56/p1166689224-5.jpg)

Smoking:


Preheat your smoker to 200-210F (93-99C). I usually smoke with apple wood but I've been known to use cherry, too. After allowing the loin to come to room temperature, I hang it in the smoker for up to 4 hours of smoke. You can lay it on grates if you can't hang it. It just won't keep as much of a round shape. After smoking, I allow it whatever additional time it needs with heat only, to come to an internal temperature of 150F (66C). Rest it at room temperature until cool enough to handle, then wrap in plastic and hold in the fridge overnight. This will allow the smoke flavor to mellow a bit and permeate the meat...something that won't happen in the freezer.


http://www.brettluna.com/img/s9/v16/p1166689662-11.jpg (http://www.brettluna.com/img/s9/v16/p1166689662-4.jpg)

Storage:


When it's ready, I portion the CB (chunks, thin slices, thick slices), anc vacuum seal it. I usually get 18-22 packages of 6 slices each. I freeze whatever isn't on the menu within the next few days. Unfortunately, I can't tell you how long this stuff keeps in the fridge. If it's in the fridge at our house, it doesn't stay around that long!


http://www.brettluna.com/img/s4/v69/p1166689820-11.jpg (http://www.brettluna.com/img/s4/v69/p1166689820-4.jpg) http://www.brettluna.com/img/s10/v100/p977937369-11.jpg (http://www.brettluna.com/img/s10/v100/p977937369-5.jpg)

schlaugh
2015-Mar-15, 10:51 PM
Awesome! Thanks again. I haven't worked with curing salts yet but CB seems like a good start. I'll also start with a tenderloin - our local grocery frequently has them as BOGOs.

PetersCreek
2015-Mar-15, 11:41 PM
Just note that I've never cured a tenderloin for three weeks. For such a small and tender cut, I'd probably stick to a more conventional 3-to-5 days.

PetersCreek
2015-Mar-15, 11:41 PM
Oh...and you're most welcome.

PetersCreek
2015-Jul-05, 08:13 AM
It was a regular Meat-a-palooza weekend in Peters Creek. Since the plan was to crank up the smoker for the July 4th holiday we decided to go whole hog, so to speak, and make enough to vac-pack and save for later. I brined two pork shoulder butts totaling almost 19 pounds and smoked them on Friday. Once shredded, they yielded nine 1-pound vac-packs. Saturday, I smoked three racks of baby back ribs and two brined turkey breasts.

After all that, our Independence Day dinner consisted of: some of the ribs; some of the pork with a Carolina style sauce I ordered from a place near where I was stationed (oh so many years ago); crock pot beans, broccoli salad, and cherry pie. My celebratory adult beverage was an Ayinger Jahrhundert Bier.

PetersCreek
2015-Jul-12, 05:23 AM
Tonight's dinner: chicken stir fry noodle bowls...

20758

PetersCreek
2015-Nov-01, 03:08 AM
Tonight's dinner: Nioise Salad...and the first time making it. The beans, potatoes, and eggs turned out spot on but the seared ahi tuna was was too thin a cut so it came out medium instead of rare. Still pretty good, though.

http://www.brettluna.com/img/s6/v149/p1603978169-2.jpg (http://www.brettluna.com/img/s6/v149/p1603978169-5.jpg)

LookingSkyward
2015-Nov-01, 04:11 AM
Yum!

PetersCreek
2015-Nov-01, 04:35 AM
So I've been told elsewhere. 😉

LookingSkyward
2015-Nov-01, 05:48 AM
:)

PetersCreek
2016-Aug-07, 07:17 PM
Long time, no post in this thread. Today, I'm kippering some beautiful Sockeye salmon:

http://www.brettluna.com/img/s9/v87/p2055090191-2.jpg (http://www.brettluna.com/img/s9/v87/p2055090191-5.jpg)


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Swift
2016-Aug-07, 09:42 PM
<drool>

swampyankee
2016-Aug-07, 10:32 PM
Bad gastronomy?

Bacon ice cream. Hawaiian pizza.

PetersCreek
2016-Aug-08, 01:49 AM
Should be enough to last me awhile...

http://www.brettluna.com/img/s3/v23/p1933927915-2.jpg (http://www.brettluna.com/img/s3/v23/p1933927915-5.jpg)


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

The Backroad Astronomer
2016-Aug-08, 05:08 AM
How much postage would need to send me one?

The Backroad Astronomer
2016-Aug-08, 05:47 AM
I was just kidding.

swampyankee
2016-Aug-08, 11:58 AM
I was just kidding.

So you say now;)

I'm thinking it's time to try another brisket in the smoker....

PetersCreek
2016-Aug-08, 01:55 PM
How much postage would need to send me one?

Heh. I'm not quite ready to start a mail order business.


I'm thinking it's time to try another brisket in the smoker....

I was thinking it's about time for me to attempt some cold smoked salmon.

Jim
2016-Aug-08, 04:16 PM
Bad gastronomy?

Bacon ice cream. ...

How can any food that includes bacon be bad gastronomy?

swampyankee
2016-Aug-08, 05:35 PM
How can any food that includes bacon be bad gastronomy?

I really don't like that salty/sweet thing (salted caramel and kettle corn make me nauseous). A also prefer back bacon to belly bacon, although Amatriciana sauce needs pancetta.

And, besides which, coffee is the best flavor for ice cream.

Swift
2016-Aug-08, 07:12 PM
And, besides which, coffee is the best flavor for ice cream.
You are showing your New England roots (not that I disagree).

PetersCreek
2016-Aug-08, 08:07 PM
It's odd...and/or I am...but as much as I like coffee, including a the occasional mocha frappe, that single-note flavor in ice cream just doesn't do it for me. However, one of the ice creams I make from time to time has coffee in it to support the dark chocolate main flavor.

Buttercup
2016-Aug-08, 08:12 PM
...And, besides which, coffee is the best flavor for ice cream.

...if mixed with marshmallow and peanut butter and chocolate and slivered almonds. :D

swampyankee
2016-Aug-08, 09:55 PM
...if mixed with marshmallow and peanut butter and chocolate and slivered almonds. :D

<shiver>
</shiver>

You're not from New England, are you?

danscope
2016-Aug-08, 11:38 PM
People round these parts just LOVE coffee ice cream :) We used to get Klondike Bars "With coffee ice cream inside " .
Unnnnnn .....doggies !! And you have to try a root beer float with coffee ice cream . Fantastic .

Buttercup
2016-Aug-09, 12:08 AM
<shiver>
</shiver>

You're not from New England, are you?

:D Midwestern born and bred.

danscope Coffee ice cream in a root beer float?? I might give that a try. Otherwise, regular cola is good with chocolate ice cream.

swampyankee
2016-Aug-09, 12:40 AM
People round these parts just LOVE coffee ice cream :) We used to get Klondike Bars "With coffee ice cream inside " .
Unnnnnn .....doggies !! And you have to try a root beer float with coffee ice cream . Fantastic .

stuffies!

Of course, real fried clams have bellies. But we could start a war about lobster rolls and clam chowder....

Buttercup
2016-Aug-09, 01:04 AM
...and clam chowder....

Clam chowder :hand: One bite was enough. Never again.

I wouldn't make a good New Englander.

swampyankee
2016-Aug-09, 11:18 AM
Clam chowder :hand: One bite was enough. Never again.

Well, there's your problem. You shouldn't have to bite soup.



I wouldn't make a good New Englander.

We're a forgiving and tolerant people (really!).

Trebuchet
2016-Aug-10, 02:14 PM
Well, there's your problem. You shouldn't have to bite soup.



We're a forgiving and tolerant people (really!).

Unless, I believe, someone puts tomatoes in your chowder.

Jim
2016-Aug-10, 04:41 PM
New England clam chowder has bite-able pieces in it. When it's good it's very good.

Manhattan clam chowder completes that saying.

PetersCreek
2016-Aug-10, 06:25 PM
Well, there's your problem. You shouldn't have to bite soup.


If one is eating a bisque or other cream soup, sure, no teeth required. Same goes for the awful canned soups with noodles and veggies so mushy...well...I don't want to think about it.