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LookingSkyward
2013-May-08, 10:08 AM
Split from the 'Bugs' thread, as I didn't want to derail it after it had moved on.

Voltage, Amperage and Wattage (but not Ohmage) have all been in common use in my electronics work and play, going back...um, something like 35 years.
This includes all of my High School & Navy classes in electricity and electronics.

The one that really bugs me is the FAA use of the word certificated (vice certified) for a person with a pilot's cert.

Noclevername
2013-May-08, 11:06 AM
So what to make of Peter Dinklage?

LookingSkyward
2013-May-08, 11:10 AM
had to go look that up, as all of the immediate responses that came to mind were infractible, and I'm trying to limit my infractionage

Noclevername
2013-May-08, 11:34 AM
...It took me a second to get what you meant. :o

For those not familiar, Peter Dinklage is an actor on Game Of Thrones. His name, despite sounding like it, is not made up. Per WP: "His German ancestors were related to the Westphalian noble family "von Dincklage". "

Trebuchet
2013-May-08, 02:52 PM
The one that really bugs me is the FAA use of the word certificated (vice certified) for a person with a pilot's cert.

Also sometimes used for the airplanes. In the spirit of the thread, perhaps it should be "certificatage".

Solfe
2013-May-08, 03:36 PM
Pwnage.

swampyankee
2013-May-08, 03:43 PM
Split from the 'Bugs' thread, as I didn't want to derail it after it had moved on.

Voltage, Amperage and Wattage (but not Ohmage) have all been in common use in my electronics work and play, going back...um, something like 35 years.
This includes all of my High School & Navy classes in electricity and electronics.

The one that really bugs me is the FAA use of the word certificated (vice certified) for a person with a pilot's cert.

FAA and the other certification agencies -- even the British CAA -- use the same term as "certification" is the process of issuing a certificate. Of course, I started my engineering career testing commercial turbofan engines for (among other things) certification.

LookingSkyward
2013-May-08, 04:04 PM
Yep, I have some non-FAA type courses for certifications - now I'm certified.

Gillianren
2013-May-08, 04:37 PM
I took some good-natured ribbing (ribbage?) for my "film buffery" thread title. However, in my circle of friends, we tend to put random suffixes on things if we need a new word and one isn't available. "-Age" is one of them, as is "-ry" (or, in this case, "-ery.") This is the potential hazard of having the circle of friends I do, I guess.

Trebuchet
2013-May-08, 04:54 PM
Perhaps you should get a mod to change it to "bufferage" for you!

Sorry, just jokage.

PetersCreek
2013-May-08, 06:55 PM
The one that really bugs me is the FAA use of the word certificated (vice certified) for a person with a pilot's cert.

As an FAA employee, I suppose I should take umbrage that you would discourage, nay, disparage us with such scurrilous verbage. It's a perfectly good term of art and we all know that the usage of specialized jargon is what sets us apart from other primates...well, that and opposable thumbage. :whistle: My controllers are also issued a Certificate to Operate (CTO) although they aren't typically referred to as certificated but rather, as Certified Professional Controllers. Me, I'm a Fund Certifier but I got me no fancified certicate for that.

NEOWatcher
2013-May-08, 08:07 PM
(but not Ohmage)
I can't get the replay out of my mind of Janeway's Chaotica saying the anagram of that.

peteshimmon
2013-May-08, 08:16 PM
Media people still like to talk about footage
when some video is shown. Someone should take
them by the hand down to the cellars of their
TV station. Look, no film developing rooms!

Mind, the tracks on a hard drive would be some
length, several feet. But would the cells in
some flash memory be a few feet if lined up?

PetersCreek
2013-May-08, 08:36 PM
But then, gigabytage just doesn't have the same ring to it, does it?

Gillianren
2013-May-08, 11:14 PM
I'm not sure we have a single-word term for "video shot in a digital format," and I'm perfectly content to continue referring to it all as "footage." It's "footage" on video, even though you don't actually have to develop the film on it, because it was still feet of tape. However, I think it's a word that it going to outlive its etymological significance.

Noclevername
2013-May-08, 11:54 PM
I'm not sure we have a single-word term for "video shot in a digital format," and I'm perfectly content to continue referring to it all as "footage." It's "footage" on video, even though you don't actually have to develop the film on it, because it was still feet of tape. However, I think it's a word that it going to outlive its etymological significance.

I recently heard a TV commercial say "don't touch that dial!" Gave me chuckleage.

When speaking, I often add "-ness", "-y" or variants to words to turn their nounliness verby. (You see why I don't usually do it while writing.)

Jens
2013-May-09, 12:45 AM
However, in my circle of friends, we tend to put random suffixes on things if we need a new word and one isn't available. "-Age" is one of them, as is "-ry" (or, in this case, "-ery.") This is the potential hazard of having the circle of friends I do, I guess.

I don't think it's just your circle of friends. I think it's a respected tradition in English. I think I'm correct, but I suppose it may just be bogosage.

Paul Beardsley
2013-May-09, 06:34 AM
When speaking, I often add "-ness", "-y" or variants to words to turn their nounliness verby.

Adding "-ness" renders adjectivy words nouny (e.g. "dark" -> "darkness") whereas "-y" imbues an adjectivitiness to the nouniest of nouns (e.g. "desk" -> "desky" as in, "It was an especially desky room, Ransom reflected, even by office standards." (From "The Drained Swimming Pool Escapement Crash" by J.G. Ballard.))

zjburch
2013-May-09, 06:45 AM
Interestingnessly....

Strange
2013-May-09, 09:43 AM
But would the cells in
some flash memory be a few feet if lined up?

A few kilometres, in fact. Quite some mileage.

LookingSkyward
2013-May-09, 01:15 PM
Speaking of mileage, how is fuel consumption referred to in metric? I'm guessing it's not fuel Kilometerage...

Strange
2013-May-09, 01:18 PM
In the UK we still measure roads in miles but sell petrol in litres. Therefore, we measure consumptionage in miles per gallon (which is not the same as a US gallon so ... your mileage may vary).

Trebuchet
2013-May-09, 01:32 PM
In the UK we still measure roads in miles but sell petrol in litres. Therefore, we measure consumptionage in miles per gallon (which is not the same as a US gallon so ... your mileage may vary).

And of course you also drive on the wrong sideage of that roadage.

Arneb
2013-May-09, 02:36 PM
Speaking of mileage, how is fuel consumption referred to in metric? I'm guessing it's not fuel Kilometerage...

No, we use a reversed ratio and a factorage of x100 to bring the numberage into easily pronounceable digitalitiess: Litres per 100 km (my relatively large diesel car does 5 on country roads, 7 in the city and 9 on the autobahn).

So we dont' experess kilometrage (although I heard the word quilometraje said in a Spanish), we use consumptivity (or is that consumptiteage?).

NEOWatcher
2013-May-09, 03:18 PM
we use consumptivity (or is that consumptiteage?).
I don't know if you are serious on that one, but I have heard consumption being used in place of mileage.

Another one I ran into last night while doing a crossword puzzle:
Poundage of bricks units: Tons.

Strange
2013-May-09, 03:41 PM
And of course you also drive on the wrong sideage of that roadage.

From Wikipedia:
Research in 1969 by J. J. Leeming showed countries driving on the left have a lower collision rate than countries driving on the right, although he acknowledged that the sample of left-hand rule countries he had to work with was small, and he was very careful not to claim that his results proved that the differences were due to the rule of the road.

Ivan Viehoff
2013-May-10, 02:36 PM
And of course you also drive on the wrong sideage of that roadage.
If enjoy rideage of bicycleage or horseage, and have right handage, you are likely to have opinage that left is the correct sideage of the roadage. This is because you will naturally perform your mountage from the sideage rather than the middleage of the roadage.

Ivan Viehoff
2013-May-10, 02:38 PM
Btw I always eat porage.

Arneb
2013-May-10, 07:31 PM
I don't know if you are serious on that one, but I have heard consumption being used in place of mileage.

Well, given the total seriositivitage of this thread, obviously I am.