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rrstarmom
2004-Nov-19, 04:19 AM
I guess it's from the habit of always looking up...(that's what you do when your only 5 foot tall! ) As much as I enjoy looking at the night sky, I still find myself fascinated by the weather. Living in "tornado alley" will do that to you too. Just curious if any other fellow astronomers are into weather, predicting, storm chasers etc... I'd love to hear your stories.
( It's funny how 4:19 am on Friday is still 10:19 pm on Thursday here in Texas.)

cyswxman
2004-Nov-19, 06:10 AM
There are a few of us here, myself included. I'm a meteorologist that's sort of into astronomy. I used to chase storms in Oklahoma while in college. :)

TriangleMan
2004-Nov-19, 11:47 AM
Since Bermuda is only 20 square miles I let the storms chase me. :wink:

Wally
2004-Nov-19, 12:40 PM
I'm a big time severe storm fanatic! They just fascinate me for some reason. Never did any actual storm chasing, but you'll always find me outside or monitoring online radars whenever severe weather's in the area. I've also studied several online courses on severe weather and storm chasing, just for my own knowledge. I like to consider myself a least a bit more knowledgable than the next guy where weather's concerned. Matter of fact, when I crew in the summer for sailboat races, the captian will oftentimes ask my opinion on upcoming weather changes, etc.

Of course, he does so more as a tongue-in-cheek reference to my having a small bit of indian in me, to which my normal reply will often be some cryptic tale of how the "white buffalo dances wildly along the shores of the blue sea above", or some such thing. . . :)

Meteora
2004-Nov-25, 08:22 AM
I'm another meteorologist who enjoys astronomy. I don't actually chase storms, but I do pay attention when they come to me. Since I moved to Oklahoma 12 years ago, they seem to do that a LOT more often! :D

mickal555
2004-Nov-25, 09:11 AM
I lovestorms too we get a lot electrical storms here and our house has been stuck by lightning.

Edit too add
During the summer its great I watch the clouds build up at school ride home check the radar and forcast and then sit outside to watch the show. :D

01101001
2004-Nov-25, 10:12 AM
Hey, you meteorology types and weather watchers, since you spend so much time looking up, I bet you see a lot of UFOs (http://www.badastronomy.com/book/uforebuttal.html), more than the average person, huh?

mickal555
2004-Nov-25, 11:13 AM
I atcully saw two the other day I have no idea what they were

Meteora
2004-Nov-26, 06:59 AM
Hey, you meteorology types and weather watchers, since you spend so much time looking up, I bet you see a lot of UFOs (http://www.badastronomy.com/book/uforebuttal.html), more than the average person, huh?

Why, of course we do. Those flying objects would have been a lot more easily identified before they were shredded and flung into the air by the tornadoes, though.... :wink:

rrstarmom
2004-Nov-30, 05:04 AM
Well I think storm chasers are cool! As long as they stay smart. I've been way to close to storms before, chasing them on my own. TOO CURIOUS! (and not enough experience!) I'm fascinated by tornadoes and I always want a closer look. I always seem to be looking at the sky, and day or night, good or bad weather, there's always something to look at. And in some weird way, to me, that's Astronomy! (Besides just the stars!,
And what you're supposed to be looking at. Some things just catch your eye and you can't ignore them.) IMO. TAKE CARE! & Happy Holidays!

man on the moon
2004-Dec-01, 01:12 AM
I atcully saw two the other day I have no idea what they were

and i suppose if you knew what they were they would still be UFOs, right? :wink:

i find storms to be...well, no words can really describe. i love tracking them on radar also and watching them blow through. if i had to do a "find new data" research project it would be on tornadoes. i also have a great affinity for maps, but since they have absolutley nothing to do (directly) with this thread i'll not comment.

and to keep this a little bit astronomy oriented, i will also add that watching clouds blow across the moon can distract me for minutes to hours at a time. :)

Meteora
2004-Dec-01, 08:21 AM
if i had to do a "find new data" research project it would be on tornadoes. i also have a great affinity for maps, but since they have absolutley nothing to do (directly) with this thread i'll not comment.

Nice. Tornadoes are what primarily got me interested in meteorology many years ago. My B.A. degree is in geography.

Of course, there isn't much that's better than a weather map. :D

Maksutov
2004-Dec-01, 08:43 AM
if i had to do a "find new data" research project it would be on tornadoes. i also have a great affinity for maps, but since they have absolutley nothing to do (directly) with this thread i'll not comment.

Nice. Tornadoes are what primarily got me interested in meteorology many years ago. My B.A. degree is in geography.

Of course, there isn't much that's better than a weather map. :D
How about a nice topographic map? (http://www.topozone.com/map.asp?lat=35.4675&lon=-97.51611)

However to me this one is much more interesting. (http://www.topozone.com/map.asp?lat=37.63194&lon=-119.36944)

Meteora
2004-Dec-01, 09:22 AM
How about a nice topographic map? (http://www.topozone.com/map.asp?lat=35.4675&lon=-97.51611)

However to me this one is much more interesting. (http://www.topozone.com/map.asp?lat=37.63194&lon=-119.36944)

:o

Okay... where's the "drool" emoticon??? :D

Wow. The first one is about 15 miles north of where I am right now - and the second one is roughly 100 miles east of where I lived in the mid-1980s. Lovely place. Too bad I only had two weeks of vacation per year - and only lived there two years - and usually preferred to go to the coast instead. :D

Maksutov
2004-Dec-01, 10:22 AM
How about a nice topographic map? (http://www.topozone.com/map.asp?lat=35.4675&lon=-97.51611)

However to me this one is much more interesting. (http://www.topozone.com/map.asp?lat=37.63194&lon=-119.36944)

:o

Okay... where's the "drool" emoticon??? :D

Wow. The first one is about 15 miles north of where I am right now - and the second one is roughly 100 miles east of where I lived in the mid-1980s. Lovely place. Too bad I only had two weeks of vacation per year - and only lived there two years - and usually preferred to go to the coast instead. :D
Hey, we got you bracketed! :-) Glad you enjoyed the maps.

The Triple Divide Peak to Mt. Ritter section of the Sierra Nevada is where I first did climbing over 10,000 feet. Hence the affinity for that particular map. Would have dropped by to see you over in the valley (Manteca, Modesto, Stockton area?), but that was 1966, and it appears you hadn't arrived there yet.

One small anecdote: the first time I was in a National Park was when I climbed over Isberg Pass (10,500'), which is part of the eastern boundary of Yosemite Park. It's pretty remote, but you can see Half Dome about 20 miles to the northwest. I asked my climbing partner if I we should expect a ridge-running Park Ranger along soon collecting park entrance fees. She laughed. Of course, we didn't see one for the duration of the climb, so it was free. :wink:

Meteora
2004-Dec-02, 09:12 AM
Hey, we got you bracketed!

:o

Good thing my guess was a bit off... :D


The Triple Divide Peak to Mt. Ritter section of the Sierra Nevada is where I first did climbing over 10,000 feet. Hence the affinity for that particular map. Would have dropped by to see you over in the valley (Manteca, Modesto, Stockton area?), but that was 1966, and it appears you hadn't arrived there yet.

Ceres. I lived in Ceres, just south of Modesto. In 1966 I still lived in my home town in central Illinois. My first visit to California was a family vacation in 1968, and we did visit Yosemite that time.

I don't even remember Isberg Pass - and my experience with Yosemite was mainly in a car, although I have done a little wandering around at Tuolumne Meadows (11,000-ish feet elevation). The only mountain climbing I've done recently was Elk Mountain. It's a whopping 500 feet or so tall, in the Wichita Mountains in southwest Oklahoma. One time I climbed it (with my guy friend), the temperature was approx. 100 F (38 C) and the dew point was around 70-75 F (22-24 C), so it was hot and really humid. Quite a difference from 10,000-foot mountains! (Oh - and the trail isn't overly challenging, either - except when bison or rattlesnakes show up along it. I've had to detour around bison, but haven't yet encountered any evil snakes.)