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View Full Version : Water on/in Mars Poll



Chip
2004-Nov-19, 08:01 AM
What do you think?

2004-Nov-19, 10:08 AM
I've opted for "on or under". I can't see water all vanishing. If it's not locked up as subterranean ice, it ought to be within silicates?

Cugel
2004-Nov-19, 12:32 PM
The poll didn't say anything about quantities (of liquid water). If there is a large volume of water ice on the poles there must also be a thin film of liquid water at the bottom, in the rock-ice boundary. This is a proven fact on Earth, so why not on Mars. This layer of liquid water might only be a milimeter thick or less, but it's still liquid and could sustain live.
Aquifers also seem likely to me (especially the underground type :lol: ), however, as far as I know this is still hypothetical.
So I picked the first option.

Nethius
2004-Nov-19, 04:57 PM
I asked a similar question a little while back.

I feel that there is probably atleast some liquid water under the surface, maybe a few feet down, but there no the less.

Too bad NASA didn't attach some sort of long drill to dig down into the surface and grab samples. But, I know there is only so much they can stick on those rovers... maybe in the future?

*EDIT* You can check my post and responses - here (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=16426)

Captain Kidd
2004-Nov-19, 05:08 PM
Too bad NASA didn't attach some sort of long drill to dig down into the surface and grab samples. They could always call up Bruse Willis and see if he's interested.

Sorry, sorry, sorry, that just slipped out. 8-[

On the last option, do you mean there was water but it evaporated and was subsequently blow out into space by the solar wind?

Chip
2004-Nov-19, 06:42 PM
...On the last option, do you mean there was water but it evaporated and was subsequently blow out into space by the solar wind?

I was thinking of the large areas seen from orbit that appear to have been ancient shorelines. Theories vary as to how long those seas lasted. One extreme view is that the shores are misinterpreted features and that Mars was likely always dry. (I don't go along with that given the Rover discoveries of minerals that formed in standing watrer.)

Chip
2004-Nov-19, 06:49 PM
...You can check my post and responses - here (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=16426)

I also have been wondering about the Mars Global Surveyor views of what appears to be seepage from the sides of crater walls. It looks like muddy sludge sliding off where underground water intersects the crater wall and semi-freezes, melts and evaporates.

jt-3d
2004-Nov-20, 12:19 AM
I'm the woowoo that voted that Mars never had water. I mean oceans, lakes, rivers and such. I know it has clouds and therefore water but no, no oceans.