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Wolverine
2004-Nov-23, 12:13 PM
Science taps into ocean secrets (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/4033555.stm)

Some 13,000 new marine species have been discovered in the past year, according to information released by an international alliance of scientists.

Love the second image in the article, there's a larger version here (http://www.coml.org/medres/mar-eco/fig18.htm) with a description.

ToSeek
2004-Nov-23, 02:52 PM
Cool stuff - thanks for posting it!

beskeptical
2004-Nov-25, 06:55 AM
oooohhh...That creature is so beautiful.

I have been fascinated with the ocean discoveries as much as I have been with the astronomy discoveries. So much to discover, so little time. I hope the anti-aging stuff is available in time for me to benefit from it just to stay alive to see all the new discoveries that are still to come.

sarongsong
2004-Nov-25, 08:23 PM
"Since becoming the king of the world seven years ago with "Titanic", James Cameron has spent much of his time in the underwater world, making 3-D documentaries about his deep-sea explorations...the three-dimensional cameras he used to shoot...the upcoming Aliens of the Deep (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0417415/), another IMAX documentary about underwater exploration for which he worked with NASA scientists..."
http://tinyurl.com/3r9c3

sarongsong
2004-Nov-26, 12:57 AM
"...Next fall, Emory Kristof...along with an A-team of biologists, oceanographers, and two of Jacques Cousteau's grandchildren, will venture to the Mariana Trench... drop a remotely operated camera system 7 miles down to the bottom of the deepest spot on Earth...Here's a virtual descent to 36,201 feet..."
http://tinyurl.com/5nq5r

beskeptical
2004-Nov-27, 06:30 AM
"...Next fall, Emory Kristof...along with an A-team of biologists, oceanographers, and two of Jacques Cousteau's grandchildren, will venture to the Mariana Trench... drop a remotely operated camera system 7 miles down to the bottom of the deepest spot on Earth...Here's a virtual descent to 36,201 feet..."
http://tinyurl.com/5nq5rOoh. I like that little summary. Simply amazing we have been that deep. Even more amazing, multicelled organisms at those pressures. The range of habitat limits for life grows larger. :D

Wolverine
2004-Nov-27, 05:55 PM
I confess, when I first examined the lobate ctenophore shot, I thought The Abyss (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0096754/) all the way. 8)

Wolverine
2004-Nov-27, 06:14 PM
I have been fascinated with the ocean discoveries as much as I have been with the astronomy discoveries. So much to discover, so little time.

Agreed -- while I'm more partial to astronomical pursuits personally, I consider it of paramount importance to explore and document everything possible here at home. In discussions with several friends, they've argued that space expolation isn't as important as here on Earth, citing the uncharted depths and possibility of features/species therein. While I certainly understand their positions and that they might not grasp the significance of present and future missions within the solar system (and beyond), I also recognize the commonality involved -- scientific funding in general needs a huge shot in the arm.

sarongsong
2004-Dec-09, 02:08 AM
...and yet another expedition, currently underway:
"On Nov. 30, a University of Delaware research team will set sail on the 21-day expedition, Extreme 2004: Exploring the Deep Frontier (http://www.ocean.udel.edu/extreme2004/).
Are you ready to submerge? For all the latest news from our team at sea, log on to "Daily Discoveries" and dive in!..."

Ilya
2004-Dec-09, 03:32 AM
http://www.bio.psu.edu/cold_seeps/foodisop.html

http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/explorations/02mexico/logs/oct13/media/isopod.html

sarongsong
2004-Dec-09, 04:38 AM
Yum!---is that second link (which has an extra character at the end of it) the same as crab-legs?

Wolverine
2004-Dec-09, 04:54 AM
I certainly hope not. :o

Ilya
2004-Dec-09, 04:57 AM
I do not understand your question, but I fixed the link. Here is another cutie:

http://digicam.co.za/gallery/details.php?image_id=2092&sessionid=75878c3983e4d0 03664dfb2d60ef22f9

I was really hoping to find a "face" image which does justice to Bathynomus eyes -- in a natural environment and not obstructed by the antennae, they look exactly like the face of an Imperal Stormtrooper. The one above would be perfect except for antennae. These are pretty good:

http://www.whozoo.org/Anlife2001/chelsy/clh_Bathynomus.htm

And this one is really freaky:

http://boards.collectors-society.com/showflat.php?Cat=&Board=cooler2&Number=553292&page =0&view=collapsed&sb=5&o=&fpart=3

sarongsong
2004-Dec-09, 05:13 AM
I do not understand your question...
Oh---isopod legs look somewhat like crab legs, which I find delicious, but very expensive---like $13 a pound.