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View Full Version : Are some news stories really ads themselves?



NEOWatcher
2013-Jul-01, 05:09 PM
Ok; I can understand filler stories. I can almost understand reporting on something viral, provided they give a little more insight into the story.

But; to create a news story about one of those news stories?

Cap'n Crunch, a frosted fraud? (http://us.cnn.com/video/?/video/us/2013/06/29/ac-ridiculist-captain-crunch.cnn#/video/us/2013/06/29/ac-ridiculist-captain-crunch.cnn)
Ok Mr. AC. I can understand reporting a story as ridiculous, and often you are right.
But; it was your network that reported it, and it was a fun little story to begin with that took it with a light-hearted attitude in the first place.

It's stories like this that makes me think a lot of stories are really paid advertisements. If so, I cry "foul".

Actually; if it isn't, I like the Cap'ns response better than AC's. (Here's the entire response (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iqMFV-QbxSE))

And that's not even addressing the fact that we don't know who or what he was captain of. In fact, even Captain Kirk has 3 stripes on his sleeve.

Swift
2013-Jul-01, 05:26 PM
Are some news stories really ads themselves?
Yes.
Quite frequently I see "news" stories on either local or national news about what's coming up on that network's latest reality show, reported as if it was actually news. Funny thing, the other networks don't seem to pick up the story. :rolleyes:

NEOWatcher
2013-Jul-01, 05:37 PM
Yes.
Quite frequently I see "news" stories on either local or national news about what's coming up on that network's latest reality show, reported as if it was actually news. Funny thing, the other networks don't seem to pick up the story. :rolleyes:
Those seem very obvious to me because they are about themselves.
It's the subtle ones that talk about something that went viral, or controversial that make me wonder. This one seems to be teetering on the edge for me.

Gillianren
2013-Jul-01, 05:50 PM
It's been going on for some time. I've only ever lived in major television markets, so our standard of local news was better than this, but it's a well-known practice that certain publicity agencies have sent entire stories, including "reporters," to local news outlets and gotten them on the air as news. When all they were was press releases.

NEOWatcher
2013-Jul-01, 07:25 PM
It's been going on for some time. I've only ever lived in major television markets, so our standard of local news was better than this, but it's a well-known practice that certain publicity agencies have sent entire stories, including "reporters," to local news outlets and gotten them on the air as news. When all they were was press releases.
Yes; I do see a lot of that. But; sometimes I wonder sometimes if the publicity agent gives the station an "incentive" to air it.

Gillianren
2013-Jul-02, 12:31 AM
My understanding is that they seldom need one. The savings to their budget is considered enough.

Tuckerfan
2013-Jul-02, 01:49 AM
Yes; I do see a lot of that. But; sometimes I wonder sometimes if the publicity agent gives the station an "incentive" to air it.
You mean like, "My client will have to reconsider the amount of advertising dollars they spend with your station if you don't air this piece."? It might not be overtly said, but I wouldn't be surprised if it wasn't strongly implied.

Ara Pacis
2013-Jul-02, 04:43 AM
Manufactured stories aren't uncommon. Whenever I see a Superbowl ad that's controversial, instead of getting upset at the stupidity of the ad agency, I congratulate them for a job well done on getting their product free publicity.

HenrikOlsen
2013-Jul-02, 09:57 AM
If you provide a news release that's written as an article and you helpfully provide pictures to accompany it, local news papers will often run it as is.
Filling pages is their goal, if you help them do so with little to no work needed on their side they're happy.

Glom
2013-Jul-02, 05:49 PM
A couple of weeks ago, the BBC ran a documentary series called Airport Live about how Heathrow works. In parts, I couldn't help but think it was a big ad for the airport.

HenrikOlsen
2013-Jul-02, 06:21 PM
A couple of weeks ago, the BBC ran a documentary series called Airport Live about how Heathrow works. In parts, I couldn't help but think it was a big ad for the airport.
Which is likely why they were allowed access in the first place.

NEOWatcher
2013-Jul-02, 06:33 PM
I can understand all this press release and laziness stuff which is why I distrust the media in the first place.

But; I think this sitation takes it just one step further by them actually following up on themselves about how they, themselves, treated the story.