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dgavin
2013-Jul-10, 01:23 PM
In 2007 a study, http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2007GL029874/abstract, began to inventory all of earth volcano's, using the data from sea floor bathymetry to identify those in the oceans.

After 60% of those had been positively identified, the researchers estimate Earth has a volcano count some where in the neighborhood of:

3,477,403

Wow, just wow. Even if the majority of these are inactive now, that's a lot of volcano's!

Swift
2013-Jul-10, 01:43 PM
Wow. I would never have guessed even a tenth of that number.

Ara Pacis
2013-Jul-10, 03:26 PM
Are they counting every little black smoker as a separate volcano?

dgavin
2013-Jul-10, 06:51 PM
Ara, From what I can gather, no. The bulk of this count are sea mounts, that were formed at the mid ocean ridges, and are now long extinct.

However the count does include cinder cones over a certain size as seperate volcano's. Which means the Newberry/Davis Lake volcanic fields qualified with about 870 volcanos. Mt. Tabor in PDX qualified as one, even though it was an outlet from a Mt. Hood related event.

The track of volcano's starting at Hawaii, and prgressivly older heading west then north west, has around 50,000. If you just counted the major sea mount edifaces, it would be more like 100.

Gillianren
2013-Jul-10, 08:45 PM
Either way, that's still a lot of volcanoes.

BigDon
2013-Jul-10, 09:16 PM
I blame global (internal) warming. :whistle:

dgavin
2013-Jul-11, 01:15 PM
Either way, that's still a lot of volcanoes.

The old adage, "That's more volcano's then you can shake a stick at." doesn't even express it well.

profloater
2013-Oct-18, 04:12 PM
Another story I found in this week's New Scientist which arrives at my place on Friday, reviewing volcanoes especially the recently studied Mount Samala a VEI 7 volcano (just one down from Yellowstone), 1257,which is now linked to the terrible 13th C weather. How long before someone suggest some deliberate man made volcanoes to cool the planet down, or can we just wait? Iceland seems overdue. A Mount st Helens size (VEI 5) is said to occur every 10 years or so and a Krakatoa one (VEI 6) every hundred years or so, that chap went off in 1883. Maybe we do tend to forget, or we never really knew how significant eruptions are in our climate.

Barabino
2014-Jan-17, 08:01 AM
Another story I found in this week's New Scientist which arrives at my place on Friday, reviewing volcanoes especially the recently studied Mount Samala a VEI 7 volcano (just one down from Yellowstone), 1257,which is now linked to the terrible 13th C weather. How long before someone suggest some deliberate man made volcanoes to cool the planet down, or can we just wait? Iceland seems overdue. A Mount st Helens size (VEI 5) is said to occur every 10 years or so and a Krakatoa one (VEI 6) every hundred years or so, that chap went off in 1883. Maybe we do tend to forget, or we never really knew how significant eruptions are in our climate.

MAYBE NOT A GOOD IDEA: ashes cool down the planet, but CO2 warms it up!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snowball_Earth

publiusr
2014-Mar-08, 08:10 PM
Something I was thinking about--concerning the Malaysian airplane loss
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/03/08/us-malaysiaairlines-flight-idUSBREA2701720140308

Wasn't there some plumes that remained aloft from that part of the world recently? Not all volcanoes are as well measured

Mount Sinabung in Sumatra seems suspect: "On 07 March 2014, an eruption resulted in an ash plume extending west and reaching a height of 4 km"
http://www.weather.gov.sg/wip/pp/volcanic.html

NorthernDevo
2014-Mar-09, 04:40 AM
Something I was thinking about--concerning the Malaysian airplane loss
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/03/08/us-malaysiaairlines-flight-idUSBREA2701720140308

Wasn't there some plumes that remained aloft from that part of the world recently? Not all volcanoes are as well measured

Mount Sinabung in Sumatra seems suspect: "On 07 March 2014, an eruption resulted in an ash plume extending west and reaching a height of 4 km"
http://www.weather.gov.sg/wip/pp/volcanic.html

I suppose its possible; but if that aircraft flew into volcanic ash the crew would have plenty of time to call in a report and later; a distress call if the engines failed.
That didn't happen - the 777 for all intents and purposes simply disappeared; which suggests (to me at least) something far more catastrophic than ash. Besides; the Boeing would have been flying far higher than 4km. That's about 12,000 feet; average cruise for a 777 is three times that. :)

Squink
2014-Mar-14, 11:20 PM
3,477,403
Wow, just wow.
If we were to evenly distribute the earth's human population between volcanoes, so as perhaps to drop nuclear bombs on them, that'd be 2013.0 people per crater; far too crowded for my taste.