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VagueIdea
2013-Aug-27, 01:56 AM
Hi folks,

I was wondering how much pressure exists inside Ceres. On earth if you want to build a underwater habitat you need to be acutely aware of construction techniques to resist collapsing pressures.

If there was a ocean or ice layer on Ceres I would assume that pressures below the surface are much much lower?

Does that make flimsier building techniques possible at that intriguing location?



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Hlafordlaes
2013-Aug-27, 11:23 AM
Hello, VagueIdea,

To estimate gravity, you can get the Ceres numbers to plug in from the wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceres_%28dwarf_planet%29) (r and mass), and here (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php?9855-How-do-I-calculate-gravity-on-other-planets&p=184156#post184156) is an old CQ post with the formula needed. That's only part of what you need to calculate pressure at differing depths, but the much lower gravity is going to help. To finish up you calculations, here is a formula (http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080901233559AARBPlh) I found. You'll need to make an educated guess about the water density.

But sure, looking at the equations, you're certainly going to end up with far lower pressures than on Earth, and will need less resistance at any given depth. Flimsier it is!

JustAFriend
2013-Aug-27, 10:21 PM
Might also depend on if the structures have to fend off anything with teeth... :D

VagueIdea
2013-Aug-28, 01:32 AM
Might not be just teeth. :)

For instance I have often thought that earth life doesn't seem to widely make use of a spear appendage.

There are examples of spines and scorpion tails etc but our original fish design doesn't seem to have allowance for a frontal 'tail' of hard barb.

Seems like a excellent predator design to me so I wonder if its evolved anywhere.


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VagueIdea
2013-Aug-28, 01:37 AM
...
But sure, looking at the equations, you're certainly going to end up with far lower pressures than on Earth, and will need less resistance at any given depth. Flimsier it is!

Thanks mate. That's good info and I might try my ancient school math skills out on it all soonish.

When considering habitats on other worlds I suppose it is possible to forget that radically different conditions could mean radical solutions are possible. Plastic framing on aluminium ribs might be strong enough to have a viable underwater habitat in a low gravity situation for instance.


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DonM435
2013-Aug-28, 02:45 AM
Might also depend on if the structures have to fend off anything with teeth... :D

It would be highly ironic for a planet named for the goddess of cereal to harbor carnivorous predators.