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Tuckerfan
2004-Nov-30, 03:48 AM
I'm not talking about the one he wore on the Moon that disappeared and later reappeared, but the new edition that's supposedly come out with his autograph on it. A friend of mine was telling me about it, but googling yields nothing on it, not even using the word "chronograph" for watch. Anyone know anything about it?

sarongsong
2004-Nov-30, 07:36 AM
Maybe you can ask Omega directly here (http://www.omegawatches.com/omega/cp_history_a).

Donnie B.
2004-Nov-30, 12:15 PM
Geez, you scared me. When I saw the title of the thread I thought he was dying or something.

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Nov-30, 04:12 PM
Maybe you can ask Omega directly here (http://www.omegawatches.com/omega/cp_history_a).
Five seconds per day? Yikes.

kucharek
2004-Nov-30, 04:17 PM
Maybe you can ask Omega directly here (http://www.omegawatches.com/omega/cp_history_a).
Five seconds per day? Yikes.


With the chronograph running, the watches were literally boiled at 93 then frozen at - 18 without interruption; they were soaked in oxygen for two days, exposed to shocks of 40 g in every direction, repeatedly placed in a vacuum chamber 15 times, compressed, decompressed, subjected to vibrations, ringing, etc.

Try this with your cheapo quartz...

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Nov-30, 04:35 PM
With the chronograph running, the watches were literally boiled at 93 then frozen at - 18 without interruption; they were soaked in oxygen for two days, exposed to shocks of 40 g in every direction, repeatedly placed in a vacuum chamber 15 times, compressed, decompressed, subjected to vibrations, ringing, etc.

Try this with your cheapo quartz...
OK, I'll try, but first, where can I find some oxygen (http://www-safety.deas.harvard.edu/services/oxygen.html) that is liquid at -18? :)

And you're going to have to wait until I go back to Wyoming, before I boil my watch. I could boil it at 99, if that would be acceptable. The shock thing has been taken care of. :)

Swift
2004-Nov-30, 06:16 PM
With the chronograph running, the watches were literally boiled at 93 then frozen at - 18 without interruption; they were soaked in oxygen for two days, exposed to shocks of 40 g in every direction, repeatedly placed in a vacuum chamber 15 times, compressed, decompressed, subjected to vibrations, ringing, etc.

Try this with your cheapo quartz...
OK, I'll try, but first, where can I find some oxygen (http://www-safety.deas.harvard.edu/services/oxygen.html) that is liquid at -18? :)

And you're going to have to wait until I go back to Wyoming, before I boil my watch. I could boil it at 99, if that would be acceptable. The shock thing has been taken care of. :)
The say "soaked in oxygen", they don't say the state, so I suppose it could have been soaked in oxygen gas, though I don't get the point. I suppose at some pressure above atmospheric oxygen is a liquid at -18.

I also wonder what they were boiled in at 93 (1-propanol boils at 97). It wasn't water, unless they were below 1 atmosphere in pressure.

Its just generally a weird description.

As far as the 5 seconds per day accuracy, I suppose that might have been good in the early 1960s. Current, cheapo quartz watches are much better than that, with accuracies in the 10s of parts-per-million (better than a second per day). They don't have great durability though, like handling 40g. In fact, because of the temperature dependence of the quartz device in the watch, putting the watch in the freezer will throw off the accuracy by a small amount.

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Nov-30, 08:37 PM
I also wonder what they were boiled in at 93 (1-propanol boils at 97). It wasn't water, unless they were below 1 atmosphere in pressure.
Hence the trip to Wyoming :)