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View Full Version : Software Corps that suck big time?



Inclusa
2013-Sep-16, 03:49 AM
Some may name Microsoft, McAfee, Symantec, Adobe, and Google.
Unless you are a Linux user, you most likely use some form of Microsoft stuffs (but often enough, we still need to save files in MS office formats, even in Libre Office).
McAfee and Symantec are annoying 'cause they almost act like viruses themselves (difficult to remove and slow performance A LOT.)
Adobe Flash cannot be avoided for sure, but their products are mediocre at best.
Google? Gmail is attached to so darn many functions (especially a smart phone, which doesn't quite work without a gmail account). Google Chrome and its variants are used a lot, too. I use Comodo Dragon and Ice Dragon. While google search is still mainstream, due to privacy concerns, I use duckduckgo mostly.

Nick Theodorakis
2013-Sep-16, 12:51 PM
I had to install java to run a data analysis program I needed, and was so peeved at Oracle/Sun for trying to inflict Ask.com crapware into my browser.

Trebuchet
2013-Sep-16, 02:40 PM
Software Corps that suck big time?

All of them?

DonM435
2013-Sep-16, 02:42 PM
You know what they say: The day that Microsoft makes something that doesn't suck will be the day they start making vacuum cleaners.

Nicolas
2013-Sep-17, 07:17 AM
May I note, especially on this board, that it would be nice to also add why something sucks in your opinion.

I can agree on McAfee. Expensive, hard to remove, slows down PC, and their encrypted USB stick software is not compatible with their own Endpoint Security. Oh boy...
Symantec is in the same league as McAfee for me. I prefer lightweight virus scanners.

Adobe...WHY do their products need to get a major update every 2 days? It's not like Acrobat Reader is an OS or something.

Trebuchet
2013-Sep-17, 02:02 PM
Adobe...WHY do their products need to get a major update every 2 days? It's not like Acrobat Reader is an OS or something.

And why do they update Flash and NOT FIX THE PROBLEM OF CONSTANT CRASHES???!!!
(And yes, I HAVE turned off Chrome's internal flash player.)

Inclusa
2013-Sep-18, 03:35 AM
And why do they update Flash and NOT FIX THE PROBLEM OF CONSTANT CRASHES???!!!
(And yes, I HAVE turned off Chrome's internal flash player.)

I use Sumatra for my pdf files, but we cannot avoid flash most of the time, right?
Is there something wrong with your computer, though?

Trebuchet
2013-Sep-18, 04:58 AM
I use Sumatra for my pdf files, but we cannot avoid flash most of the time, right?
Is there something wrong with your computer, though?

All of my computers?

Inclusa
2013-Sep-18, 08:51 AM
Ok, I run three currently: two Windows 7, one Xubuntu Linux.

Trebuchet
2013-Sep-18, 02:21 PM
All of my computers?

I should probably add that one of the computers is really old, that I haven't had a flash crash in several days, and that I'm using Chrome as my browser.

Solfe
2013-Sep-19, 02:52 AM
I change Linux like most people change underwear, but Flash always gives me trouble with Linux. xPud*, Mint, Ubuntu, CentOS, and Xandros** all have issues from time to time. In one case, I installed CentOS and flash didn't work at all. That was likely my fault, but darned if I know what I did.

Flash doesn't seem too horrible on Windows 7, but I still love to loathe Flash.

*xPud isn't a whole system really but I like the interface. **Ok Xandros is pretty bad, but I like it because it was my first Linux distro.

Inclusa
2013-Sep-19, 03:42 AM
I change Linux like most people change underwear

I suppose you run Linux on an USB drive, eh?
I have used Fedora, Dreamlinux, Zenwalk, Xubuntu, Ubuntu, Mint; I still prefer Xubuntu most of the time, though.

Solfe
2013-Sep-19, 04:32 AM
I suppose you run Linux on an USB drive, eh? I have used Fedora, Dreamlinux, Zenwalk, Xubuntu, Ubuntu, Mint; I still prefer Xubuntu most of the time, though. Sometimes. My Asus EEE is a triple boot or quad boot machine. I have SD cards with xPud, Windows XP, Ubuntu remix and Xandros.
I have a pair of dual boot machines. One has Windows 7 and Mint 11 or 12, and a second machine with XP and Ubuntu 11. Then there is the dedicated Ubuntu 12, CentOS and one with SliTar, but that might be the live disc and not installed on the hard drive.
My dream is to get one of my Clamshell iBooks running Linux. At one point I had a really simple disc that worked like magic, but I lost it. And now I can't find the site where I got the instructions and disc from.
As you can see, I have a problem that no 12 step program can solve.

Trebuchet
2013-Sep-19, 03:10 PM
As you can see, I have a problem that no 12 step program can solve.

Meanwhile, I'm reading this on a 10-year-old Dell Dimension 4600 with XP. As long as it keeps working, I'll keep using it.

Solfe
2013-Sep-20, 01:57 AM
I am all about preserving hardware. Old and working is almost always better "than new I and I haven't pressed all of the buttons".

This strange addiction started when I was testing software. I didn't notice how bad it was until I was using the lab at work and noticed they didn't have a Windows 98, Me, or 95 machine.

I have been getting better. I turned down a free Windows 8 laptop, gifted the neighbor a desktop with Ubuntu and discarded a bunch of old pc cases.

My newest project is to put Ubuntu on a machine so my friend's son can play Minecraft. To build this machine I am pulling an old hard drive from my iMac (10 Gb) to use a "restore drive" for the main machine. I guess the child wiped out his parents computer by copying thier entire music library to several other directories until there was no more room, so I thought a second bootable drive would be a good idea.

DonM435
2013-Sep-20, 04:50 PM
On the last few computers I’ve owned, going back some 15 years, whenever I installed a second hard disk in the case, I’ve unplugged the main disk and used the Restore CD to put the same operating system on the second disk.

When I reattach the main drive, the system behaves as it always did, with the main drive as “C:” and the second drive available, with another letter designation, for storage. On this drive, I installed basic stuff, like a browser and text editor.

Now, if the main drive fails for any reason, I can force it to boot from the other, if indeed it doesn’t do so automatically. In this case, “C:” would be on the second drive, and I could access the stuff on the main drive (now assigned another letter) as data to troubleshoot, using the alternate system for as long as needed.

Sometimes, something else forces a boot from the “wrong” drive, but I can live with that.

Now, nobody ever suggested this to me as a good idea, but it made sense to me, so I did it. Of course, I must be wasting some disk space given the overhead of a second operating system. Other than that, I haven’t had it cause any problems with it since.

Solfe
2013-Sep-20, 05:14 PM
I like that set up. I have a Mac with a couple of bootable drives, to have a version of each OS I had at the time.

Hlafordlaes
2013-Sep-20, 06:05 PM
Anybody miss keyboarding in Lotus 1-2-3A? That pre-windows era had its advantages, including really fast input on spreadsheets... which, of course, I took advantage of. Had a paper-based auditor sitting behind me as we did some budget reviews back in '86, on an 80286-based PC, and I confess I rather blithely used switching among sheets and goto navigation to make the whole experience a speeding blur, like nerds do in the movies. He gave us a quick pass on the accounts.

Solfe
2013-Sep-20, 06:12 PM
I was about to post "In all these years Excel doesn't let you switch tabs with keystrokes." I would have been wrong, because in the 2010 version you can ctrl+Page Up/Down between tabs. I don't know about older versions.

DonM435
2013-Sep-20, 06:29 PM
My first office PC has Windows 3.0 on it, but I usually came up in DOS and stayed there most of the day. I'd write both programs and documentation in WordStar. I'd only reluctantly bring up Windows when I wanted to work with two "things" at the same time (sometimes two instances of the same thing).

For a long time, MS Word didn't have any way to mark and move columns of text data, so I'd keep WordStar around for that purpose,

Trebuchet
2013-Sep-20, 06:30 PM
I was about to post "In all these years Excel doesn't let you switch tabs with keystrokes." I would have been wrong, because in the 2010 version you can ctrl+Page Up/Down between tabs. I don't know about older versions.

Yes, that works in Office 2003 for XP.

Nicolas
2013-Sep-23, 10:19 AM
There was a time where I knew all keyboard commands for MS Paint. I could totally awe the other students with my mad Paint skills. :)

Inclusa
2013-Sep-26, 06:13 AM
I am all about preserving hardware. Old and working is almost always better "than new I and I haven't pressed all of the buttons".

This strange addiction started when I was testing software. I didn't notice how bad it was until I was using the lab at work and noticed they didn't have a Windows 98, Me, or 95 machine.

I have been getting better. I turned down a free Windows 8 laptop, gifted the neighbor a desktop with Ubuntu and discarded a bunch of old pc cases.

My newest project is to put Ubuntu on a machine so my friend's son can play Minecraft. To build this machine I am pulling an old hard drive from my iMac (10 Gb) to use a "restore drive" for the main machine. I guess the child wiped out his parents computer by copying thier entire music library to several other directories until there was no more room, so I thought a second bootable drive would be a good idea.

You have done a pretty service to the environment! I must admit that the Acer laptop that used to have Windows XP preinstalled is now a completely Linux machine.

Hlafordlaes
2013-Sep-26, 12:44 PM
Well, folks, maybe software has all the faults it has...

... but I am soooo tired of people (family, friends) who task me with fixing their gear, only to disregard even the simplest of instructions to avoid getting reinfected. Over time, it's become my fault that things don't work.

If you're going to install pirated software, visit iffy sites, and click on anything that moves and has color, mebbe you ought to leave the interwebs to others and mow lawns or something. Sheesh.

Trebuchet
2013-Sep-26, 02:39 PM
I am all about preserving hardware. Old and working is almost always better "than new I and I haven't pressed all of the buttons".

Me too, except with a slight difference: I love old MECHANICAL hardware. There's nothing I like better than old machines still performing their original functions.

Speaking of software companies, the Oracle America's Cup team won the cup yesterday after being down by seven match points and taking eight straight races. I've had the impression that Larry Ellison is a bit of a jerk but it was an inspiring comeback nonetheless.

NEOWatcher
2013-Sep-26, 02:47 PM
Speaking of software companies, the Oracle America's Cup team won the cup yesterday after being down by seven match points and taking eight straight races.
I'm glad they are putting some effort into something other than software [/sarcasm]


Yes, I know... it's in the advertising budget, so don't jump all over me.

ETA:
It turns out they weren't quite on the up and up on this either: Cheating penalty nearly scuttled Team USA's America's Cup victory (http://investigations.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/09/26/20692957-cheating-penalty-nearly-scuttled-team-usas-americas-cup-victory?lite)

Solfe
2013-Sep-27, 12:49 AM
You have done a pretty service to the environment! I must admit that the Acer laptop that used to have Windows XP preinstalled is now a completely Linux machine.

Perhaps, but I need to get rid of some of these before I die and the neighbors call me "the crazy PC guy." Last aleast the mice won't eat my corpse.

Inclusa
2013-Sep-27, 03:50 AM
My 10 year old laptop is still a workhorse; except it doesn't run certain programs this well.

absael
2013-Sep-27, 04:16 AM
The companies that you mentioned are certainly among those that people most love to hate. However, in all fairness, it should be mentioned that there are a few Microsoft products that work pretty well, including, IMO, Windows (finally, after about the 5th try) and Office. I'm also a Linux user, and Microsoft has made huge contributions to the kernel. And I'm a big fan of Google search and Google maps, and I use Chrome in Linux with few complaints. Bing (Microsoft) is also a major player in search engines; I use it frequently as well. Except perhaps for specialized searches, I think of all the others as also-rans.

Also, Adobe Photoshop is very well respected, so I wouldn't say that the entire company sucks. But yeah, the others that you mentioned - Symantec and McAfee, and Adobe Flash - are not good. I'm not sure how Symantec and McAfee manage to stay in business. There are far better products available.

Solfe
2013-Sep-27, 01:22 PM
I hate microsoft for improper handling of consumer needs. They train people to install junk like monkeys then blame them when something goes wrong.

But I save my personal loathing for Flash and Java which tacks on garbage software, software that doesn't behave normally like Skype (which is owned by MS, but was actually built different from before MS.) or Spotify or anything that requires a "download manager" to be installed. AV software that can't be uninstalled by normal methods is also very bad.

Trebuchet
2013-Sep-27, 02:36 PM
I'm actually using my wife's laptop this morning because one of the other sites I regularly visit has replaced their previous ad provider, which was loaded with scams, with a new one which uses flash for everything. Opening more than one or two tabs at a time is more than the processor in my 10-year-old XP machine can cope with. The old workhorse does just fine otherwise.

NEOWatcher
2013-Sep-27, 04:39 PM
Also, Adobe Photoshop is very well respected...
But is it respected for what it does, or for it's stability?

I have Adobe Premier Elements. It's a great piece of software (IMO). But; If you run into any problems, you're up a creek without a paddle.
I see that happening to software alot. "trust us, our software should work - no diagnostics needed." Not even a unique error code that could point you in the right direction.

I was building a DVD when the system just stopped with some vague error after about an hour of processing. Nowhere in the message or on the web could I get a clue as to what the error pointed. It was a general error judging by the wide variety of suggestions out there. Nothing I did seemed to help until I decided to go through and try to remove any unused references I could find. That was not one of the suggestions I found.

I had another one where I needed to replace a soundtrack on a project I had already finished. It did the same thing. No amount of cleaning did the trick. I had to take the previously burned DVD and use it to create a new project (which eliminated all the captioning since they were now integral to the video track) and reconstruct all the DVD menus.

Trebuchet
2013-Sep-27, 04:42 PM
As I understand it, soon you'll no longer be able to buy Adobe Photoshop and other software packages. You'll have to rent it, and pay a monthly fee.

NEOWatcher
2013-Sep-27, 04:55 PM
As I understand it, soon you'll no longer be able to buy Adobe Photoshop and other software packages. You'll have to rent it, and pay a monthly fee.
That's happening in a lot of industries.
For the software industry and movie industry, they may be saving money by cutting down on the illegal copies, but at the same time, they are grabbing extra money from the legitimate users who have to continually pay for something.

It seems like you can't own anything anymore.

Solfe
2013-Sep-27, 05:15 PM
I was keeping two machines alive because I purchased Photoshop. When I was thinking of updating Photoshop for new hardware I discovered GIMP. I now use my old machines with Photoshop as a stopgap for not being able to load GIMP.