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View Full Version : Toddlers, infants dying in hot cars...repeatedly.



Buttercup
2013-Sep-24, 08:19 PM
That's seeming to be a "convenient" way of getting rid of a kid.

It's nearly every day on Twitter: Another poor child dying while being left in a car in hot weather/regions. Like just now - again:


Johnny K ‏@storm***4850 10m
Note: 41 children have died in hot vehicles so far this year/since May 10th (This is the most child deaths in hot vehicles since 2010: 49)


Johnny K ‏@storm***4850 14m
Arizona dad faces murder charge after his 1-year-old son left in hot vehicle dies; unable to find babysitter http://bit.ly/16oKN29

In our mega-multi-media world, I can't believe these parents don't understand the dangers.

Some of this has got to be murder. Not all of it...but some of it.

The police had better step in and start asking REAL questions.

I'm tired of seeing these sorts of headlines. :mad:

BigDon
2013-Sep-24, 08:38 PM
Breathe, Miss B.

Yes, this is very upsetting.

and I'm absolutely certain this is the case. By which I mean I'm positive investigators are crawling up this peoples keisters with a microscope. (Whether some of it has to be deliberate murder is debatable.)

Trebuchet
2013-Sep-24, 09:00 PM
(Whether some of it has to be deliberate murder is debatable.)

It might be being prosecuted as "felony murder", in which a death, regardless of intention, which occurs during commission of a felony (child endangerment) is prosecuted as first degree murder.

This happens to pets a lot as well. People just are really, really, stupid sometimes.

Jens
2013-Sep-24, 11:11 PM
I'm not excusing anyone for that kind of decision, but as a parent I can understand why it might happen. The kid just went to sleep and you don't want to wake them up, but you have to get the grocery shopping done, it will only take a few minutes... I think one longer-term solution is to have an infrastructure, which is more common in Europe, where you can shop in the neighborhood and bring the baby along in a stroller/pram.

Trebuchet
2013-Sep-24, 11:42 PM
I don't think the lack of infrastructure is a problem. Supermarkets here even have baby carriers built into carts.

Quite a few of the parents in these cases seem to have gone into the bar or casino for "ten minutes", which turned into a couple of hours.

JustAFriend
2013-Sep-25, 02:39 AM
That's seeming to be a "convenient" way of getting rid of a kid..... In our mega-multi-media world, I can't believe these parents don't understand the dangers.

Sorry, but there are a lot of stupid people out there.

Unfortunately intelligence is not required to make a child.

Chuck
2013-Sep-25, 02:55 AM
I don't think people know how their minds work. It seems safe enough to go into your place of business for a minute just to grab some papers but while you're there someone might distract you with a problem he's having. Then you go into work mode, forgetting about the kid in the car while you focus on the problem. The problem can hold your attention for hours. People don't realize that a distraction can be deadly.

Noclevername
2013-Sep-25, 07:36 AM
I'm not excusing anyone for that kind of decision, but as a parent I can understand why it might happen. The kid just went to sleep and you don't want to wake them up, but you have to get the grocery shopping done, it will only take a few minutes... I think one longer-term solution is to have an infrastructure, which is more common in Europe, where you can shop in the neighborhood and bring the baby along in a stroller/pram.

Parents leaving toddlers alone in a car, truck, chariot, galleon, cave, or anywhere else is a very bad idea all on its own.

NEOWatcher
2013-Sep-25, 06:11 PM
Parents leaving toddlers alone in a car, truck, chariot, galleon, cave, or anywhere else is a very bad idea all on its own.
I extend that to anywhere that is not considered a toddler restricted place in the home.
Not only for the safety consideration, but for abduction possibilities too.

I just read about how parents are backing over their kids in the driveway and groups are calling for the NHTSA to require rear cameras on cars.
When I was growing uphttp://www.websmileys.com/sm/cartoon/053.gif, the kid was in the car, in the house or told "stand where I can see you". Now, parents "assume".

Although; when I was growing up, people didn't generally bring their kids with them to places. There were very few working moms, so there were enough neighbors or relatives to help.

DonM435
2013-Sep-25, 06:50 PM
I don't think people know how their minds work. It seems safe enough to go into your place of business for a minute just to grab some papers but while you're there someone might distract you with a problem he's having. Then you go into work mode, forgetting about the kid in the car while you focus on the problem. The problem can hold your attention for hours. People don't realize that a distraction can be deadly.

I do recall of a few cases where one parent drove to work and forgot that he/she had the baby strapped in the back seat, as the kid usually went with the other parent, just not this time. Kid stays in the parked car, until the parents compare notes at the end of the day. Fatal consequences, perhaps. That must have been particularly ghastly.

starcanuck64
2013-Sep-25, 08:28 PM
The first priority is always the child, this says something about the way that many people live their lives, and it's not good.

Jens
2013-Sep-25, 11:26 PM
The first priority is always the child, this says something about the way that many people live their lives, and it's not good.

I'm not necessarily defending it, but I think it's partly a natural consequence of being a species that prospered by putting significant investments into a relatively small number of offspring. In a world with very low infant mortality we may tend to go a bit overboard.

Inclusa
2013-Sep-26, 04:59 AM
Especially today; with the burden of childbearing (both economical, psychological and physical) and childrearing, many couples go without children.

mkline55
2013-Sep-26, 01:21 PM
A couple years ago I sent suggestions to several manufacturers for sensors to sound an alarm when 1) a child or pet is left in a car, and 2) the temperature rises above some threshold. A motion sensor in the vehicle, or a weight sensor in a car seat. Anything that tells the parent that hey! You aren't in the car but your child is, and it's in danger of death. The only response I ever got amounted to thanks, but which car did you want to buy? I think manufacturers worry about being sued if such a product failed.

Buttercup
2013-Sep-26, 01:27 PM
A couple years ago I sent suggestions to several manufacturers for sensors to sound an alarm when 1) a child or pet is left in a car, and 2) the temperature rises above some threshold. A motion sensor in the vehicle, or a weight sensor in a car seat. Anything that tells the parent that hey! You aren't in the car but your child is, and it's in danger of death. The only response I ever got amounted to thanks, but which car did you want to buy? I think manufacturers worry about being sued if such a product failed.

Yep, and I don't blame them (am sure you don't either). A neglectful or stupid parent would point the finger at the automaker. We've already got enough lack of personal responsibility in this society.

R.A.F.
2013-Sep-26, 01:29 PM
That's seeming to be a "convenient" way of getting rid of a kid...snip...Some of this has got to be murder. Not all of it...but some of it.

How many of these cases have been proven to be murder?

Swift
2013-Sep-26, 01:48 PM
When I was growing uphttp://www.websmileys.com/sm/cartoon/053.gif, the kid was in the car, in the house or told "stand where I can see you". Now, parents "assume".

Although; when I was growing up, people didn't generally bring their kids with them to places. There were very few working moms, so there were enough neighbors or relatives to help.
I also have a suspicion that when we were kids accidents like those described happened all the time, but we just didn't hear about them. Our opinion of what is news and what is private information has changed, and you have the Internet to spread it all around. If some parent backed over their kid on the other side of the country, you would never hear about it.

Buttercup
2013-Sep-26, 01:50 PM
How many of these cases have been proven to be murder?

I don't know. Haven't checked the stats (you can do that).

But considering how lethal some parents can be, I can't believe all of these cases are mere accident or forgetfulness.

Guess Susan Smith should have just left her two toddlers in a hot car. It's less suspicious than driving the car into a lake and letting them drown. :(

Buttercup
2013-Sep-26, 01:54 PM
...Our opinion of what is news and what is private information has changed, and you have the Internet to spread it all around. If some parent backed over their kid on the other side of the country, you would never hear about it.

That's got to be part of it.

However, I agree more with NeoWatcher.


I also have a suspicion that when we were kids accidents like those described happened all the time, but we just didn't hear about them.

Well, most parents I grew up around were more responsible. And I don't mean "seemed"; they were.

Most people today are all-around nitwits by comparison. Then again, people my mother's age are now too often (imo) proving to be nitwits these days; became that way. *shrugs*

orionjim
2013-Sep-27, 02:26 PM
I don't know. Haven't checked the stats (you can do that).

But considering how lethal some parents can be, I can't believe all of these cases are mere accident or forgetfulness.

Guess Susan Smith should have just left her two toddlers in a hot car. It's less suspicious than driving the car into a lake and letting them drown. :(

Iím not sure what prompted your post, but the date of the first post was Sept 24th and on that date there was a lady in Shelby Township, Mi that was charged with 2nd degree murder for putting her son in her van on a hot day; then got into another car and went to work. There is very little doubt that she intended to harm the child

swampyankee
2013-Sep-27, 02:37 PM
How many of these cases have been proven to be murder?

Charging them with child neglect or endangerment is much easier. Prosecutors tend to go for the low-hanging fruit.

Buttercup
2013-Sep-27, 02:41 PM
I’m not sure what prompted your post, but the date of the first post was Sept 24th and on that date there was a lady in Shelby Township, Mi

I hadn't seen/heard of this case until now.


that was charged with 2nd degree murder for putting her son in her van on a hot day; then got into another car and went to work. There is very little doubt that she intended to harm the child

:mad:

So far this year, 41 or 42 such deaths.

You know there are some people who are paying attention, and figure "I can probably get away with it." And do it.

It's becoming far too commonplace, for all this to be coincidental.

Inclusa
2013-Sep-28, 06:10 AM
The number itself isn't that staggering; the staggering fact is the negligence of parents.
For example: several deaths from medical malpractices may not look "big" on statistics, but we still need more focuses.
Don't ignore the small statistics.

Noclevername
2013-Sep-28, 08:51 AM
So far this year, 41 or 42 such deaths.

What was it previously?

Nicolas
2013-Sep-30, 09:37 AM
I do recall of a few cases where one parent drove to work and forgot that he/she had the baby strapped in the back seat, as the kid usually went with the other parent, just not this time. Kid stays in the parked car, until the parents compare notes at the end of the day. Fatal consequences, perhaps. That must have been particularly ghastly.

2 or 3 out of 5 work days a week, I have to bring my kid to daycare. Not the other days.

That's why I always keep my work backpack at the back seat of the car next to where the kid sits (or doesn't sit). That way, I hope when I arrive at work I would register if I'd ever forget to bring him to daycare. That way, worst case would be a messed up time schedule for that day. We could live with that.