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View Full Version : Where should I start if I want a foundation in science?



Inclusa
2013-Sep-28, 04:05 AM
School science teachings were mostly about techniques, but they hardly teach anything about scientific thinking.
The foundation I want is more likely scientific thinking rather than the hard facts.

Hlafordlaes
2013-Sep-28, 12:59 PM
Hard facts (reliable observations) and the theories and models concerning them, especially theories predicting new facts that we can attempt to observe to confirm or disprove the theory, is what it's all about.

One good way to practice is to read the background on an issue, follow the arguments, try to make sense of it, and participate in a thread here. Plenty of folks around to correct us. You have a method classroom right here at your fingertips.

orionjim
2013-Sep-28, 01:21 PM
I agree with Hlafordlaes with the models and predictions are what itís all about. I would suggest a start with some basic statistics classes (enumerative) and then some (analytic) statistics through some basic experimental design classes.

I did it backwards and had to reorganize my total thought processes (not an easy task being 50 years old).

Squink
2013-Sep-28, 03:37 PM
The foundation I want is more likely scientific thinking rather than the hard facts.Logic makes a pretty firm foundation from which to engage in scientific thinking.
There's no need to immediately get hardcore about it, but there are plenty of books, such as "Introducing Logic (http://www.amazon.com/Introducing-Logic-A-Graphic-Guide/dp/1848310129)", that'll get you off to a good start.

Solfe
2013-Sep-28, 08:47 PM
Be careful of signing up for more than one course that covers logic in college. If your school offers computer science, math and philosophy and you take a logic course in all three of those fields, you could spark a holy war by simply mentioning the fact.

Suddenly, your math teacher becomes much less hard core than the philosophy or computer teachers. :)

Swift
2013-Sep-29, 03:11 PM
School science teachings were mostly about techniques, but they hardly teach anything about scientific thinking.
The foundation I want is more likely scientific thinking rather than the hard facts.
You may be interested in History of Science courses. I took a History of Visual Astronomy course in college that was great. Such courses are sometimes given through the History Department (usually at more science oriented schools), sometimes through the specific department, usually as an easy/intro course for non-majors.

There are certainly a lot of books on the history of science as a whole and specific areas of science.

There are also Philosophy of Science courses, but I have no experience with them. I am under the impression that some of them are rather anti-science.