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Tom Mazanec
2013-Oct-08, 02:43 PM
Are there in the world as of this posting?

NEOWatcher
2013-Oct-08, 02:46 PM
Wow, I don't think I can even estimate how many I have in my possession.

Swift
2013-Oct-08, 02:57 PM
As Carl Sagan would say... "billions and billions". :D

From wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microprocessor)

About ten billion CPUs were manufactured in 2008. About 98% of new CPUs produced each year are embedded.
Part of the answer to your question is how do you want to count the ones sitting inside old phones (or stoves or whatevers) in garbage dumps around the wordl.

NEOWatcher
2013-Oct-08, 03:09 PM
Part of the answer to your question is how do you want to count the ones sitting inside old phones (or stoves or whatevers) in garbage dumps around the wordl.
Not just garbage... but old electronics that are still working. I know I have at least a couple of things in my house that have a processor that are more than 10 or 20 years old. (stove, thermostat, alarm system, alarm clock, VCR...)

Swift
2013-Oct-08, 03:14 PM
Not just garbage... but old electronics that are still working. I know I have at least a couple of things in my house that have a processor that are more than 10 or 20 years old. (stove, thermostat, alarm system, alarm clock, VCR...)
Yep (that's another part of the answer). The wikipedia article mentions that only about 2% of the CPUs are used in computers.

Just looking at my work desk in front of me, there are at least two devices with CPUs (my laptop and my phone) and probably at least three others in the room (my cell phone, even though it is a very stupid phone, my calculator, and the label printer I have). And I suspect there are actually muliple processors in at least the laptop. My watch might have another, though it is not a particularly advanced watch either.

NEOWatcher
2013-Oct-08, 03:17 PM
I was going to edit, but...
Wristwatch, calculator, egg timer, fever thermometer...
Just about anything with a numeric (or more) display.

It probably also depends on what they consider a "computer". That line is getting quite fuzzy lately.

Swift
2013-Oct-08, 03:21 PM
That line is getting quite fuzzy lately.
Fuzzy computer (http://www.dumbcrooks.com/gallery/albums/computer-pictures/Red_furry_computer_case.jpg)

PetTastic
2013-Oct-08, 05:02 PM
Don't forget modern high efficiency light bulbs, often use micro controllers, to manage startup and voltage levels.
USB or SD memory devices.
Intel use many ARC micro processors in most subsystem of their computers.
In an office environment, you are never far from an ARM or ARC processor, in the phone, webcam, keyboard, mouse and screen.
It is nearly always cheaper to program an off-the-shelf micro controller to do something than build custom silicon, no matter how simple the task.

Tom Mazanec
2013-Oct-08, 05:54 PM
Do electric toothbrushes have chips? Do electric pencil sharpeners?

profloater
2013-Oct-08, 05:58 PM
heck loads of toys and all my products too. Toys probably the first to use cheap chips and still going strong. many people do not realise how many technologies get their head start in toys

NEOWatcher
2013-Oct-08, 05:59 PM
In general, no. But; I'm sure there's some geek catalog where you can find some.

Microprocessor controlled pencil sharpener... Now there's an anachronism.

NEOWatcher
2013-Oct-08, 06:00 PM
... musical greeting cards...

ShinAce
2013-Oct-08, 06:47 PM
Cars, electronic keyboards, digital cameras, controllers for (Xbox, ps3), etc...

Ivan Viehoff
2013-Oct-09, 03:38 PM
Not just garbage... but old electronics that are still working. I know I have at least a couple of things in my house that have a processor that are more than 10 or 20 years old. (stove, thermostat, alarm system, alarm clock, VCR...)
You are lucky they are still working, though maybe it is the PCB and other electronic components rather than the chip that tends to fail. Likewise, a few of the last-for-nearly-ever LED bulbs I bought died quite quickly, but I expect it was the other parts rather than the LEDs that failed.

Over 10 years ago, I moved out of my previous house with its 30-yr-old never-broke-down boiler still working fine. It uses more gas, but what you pay for the gas you probably more than save on the maintenance. I have a 25-yr-old pre-electronics fridge I keep in the garage as a spare, and it still works fine despite patches of rust. I am delighted I bought a no-electronics stove while it was still possible to do so about 12 years ago. The rest of my modern white goods with electronics keep on needing attention. Indeed I threw away a 3.5-yr old fridge recently when it broke down in similar fashion to the way it broke down when it was still under guarantee - it was such a trouble to fix it the first time (4 visits from repairers) that I reckoned it probably wasn't worth paying my own money to mend it again.