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Makgraf
2004-Dec-02, 04:33 AM
Last year someone on imdb asked where this quote was from:

"What does it do?"
"It doesn't do anything. That's the beauty of it"
To this day no one has been able to figure out where it's from though everyone remembers having have heard it.

If anything here knows please help my brain from exploding with the pain.

Andromeda321
2004-Dec-02, 05:02 AM
Hmmmmm. I don't think it's actually from something per se, just sounds incredibly similar to many other quotes. So as a result everyone's already "heard" it but no one knows where (because it doesn't really have origins). Well that's my theory anyway.

LunarOrbit
2004-Dec-02, 05:44 AM
Thank you for putting something into my head that will eventually drive me crazy. #-o :wink:

Edit: Ok... this just popped into my head... is it from the movie "Dumb and Dumber"? For some reason I think Jim Carrey is connected to that quote.

Ut
2004-Dec-02, 05:50 AM
Eh. I'm convinced it's a Futurama quote. I don't have all the DVDs yet, though, so that could be a long (though enjoyable) search.

Reacher
2004-Dec-02, 05:51 AM
Yeah, I'd have to go with Futurama as well. It just strikes me as Futurama-esque.

mickal555
2004-Dec-02, 06:05 AM
Last year someone on imdb asked where this quote was from:

"What does it do?"
"It doesn't do anything. That's the beauty of it"
To this day no one has been able to figure out where it's from though everyone remembers having have heard it.

If anything here knows please help my brain from exploding with the pain.
Simpsons?

Homer: Marge what douse it do
Marge : It douse't do any thing
Homer: No sereosly what douse it do
Marge : Whatever it douse its doing it now

BAroxMysox
2004-Dec-02, 06:15 AM
From a webpage (http://www.louisvillescene.com/columnists/judy.html):

It's from The Simpsons in the episode where Homer's half brother (I think, maybe step brother) Herb Powell is explaining his invention. He is talking about the 'drinking' bird and Homer asks, "What does it do?"

So it seems the internet can solve anything! :D

Normandy6644
2004-Dec-02, 06:20 AM
From a webpage (http://www.louisvillescene.com/columnists/judy.html):

It's from The Simpsons in the episode where Homer's half brother (I think, maybe step brother) Herb Powell is explaining his invention. He is talking about the 'drinking' bird and Homer asks, "What does it do?"

So it seems the internet can solve anything! :D

I knew it sounded familiar. That's the first thing that came to mind too.

sarongsong
2004-Dec-02, 06:29 AM
From a webpage (http://www.louisvillescene.com/columnists/judy.html):

It's from The Simpsons in the episode where Homer's half brother (I think, maybe step brother) Herb Powell is explaining his invention. He is talking about the 'drinking' bird and Homer asks, "What does it do?"

So it seems the internet can solve anything! :D
Depends where you want to stop:
"...Had to join to post this.
I just watched 'The Simpsons' episode, 'Brother, Can You Spare Two Dimes' and the line is not said.
When Herb presents his drinking bird, Homer just says, "He's drinking the water!". The other invention is the baby translator, and that actually DOES do something."
http://www.killermovies.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-7949
(bottom of page)

Silent Knight
2004-Dec-02, 08:13 PM
There are two episodes with Homer's half-brother, could it be from the other episode?

Nicolas
2004-Dec-02, 08:30 PM
My thoughts are with the Simpsons as well, and as I haven't seen any Futurama this might be teh case. I thought of the inventor, but the half brother can be the one too.

Klausnh
2004-Dec-02, 11:28 PM
My memory links it to a Stargate SG-1 episode.

Nicolas
2004-Dec-02, 11:34 PM
Haven't ever seen Stargate SG-1, so or this quote is very widespread indeed, or it ain't from SG-1...

BAroxMysox
2004-Dec-03, 06:06 AM
I also found references to Enders Game.

sidmel
2004-Dec-03, 03:38 PM
That quote for some reason sounds like something out of Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory.

Anybody else?

LunarOrbit
2004-Dec-03, 04:05 PM
That quote for some reason sounds like something out of Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory.

=D>

I think that's it!

Skyfire
2004-Dec-03, 04:16 PM
I seem to remember the concept of that quote in a book by Desmond Bagley called "Running Blind". However, I can't remember whether those are the exact words. I have been trying to find the book recently but it seems to have "gone walkies".

Wally
2004-Dec-03, 04:25 PM
That quote for some reason sounds like something out of Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory.

Anybody else?

Agreed! It was right on the tip of my tongue (or should I say, fingers). When I read sidmel's answers, a light went off in my head. So, add me to the vote WW&TCF

JimTKirk
2004-Dec-03, 05:05 PM
That quote for some reason sounds like something out of Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory.

Anybody else?

Agreed! It was right on the tip of my tongue (or should I say, fingers). When I read sidmel's answers, a light went off in my head. So, add me to the vote WW&TCF

I found the script online, but the quote wasn't there! :-?

http://wonkadotcom.tripod.com/script.html

Moose
2004-Dec-03, 05:11 PM
Hmm, while it does sound WWish, every gadget and device in the factory did something. That something often made sense only to WW himself, but it did something. If only maim bratty children with more touchy than sense.

We've had confirmation that it wasn't in the movie, and I'm 95%+ sure that I didn't read a line like that in the book either.

How about The Great Glass Elevator?

pghnative
2004-Dec-03, 08:28 PM
A quick websearch finds that this topic has been on dozens of bulletin boards for at least a year. This leads me to believe that this is the equivalent of an urban legand. The line (as written) probably has never been in a film (or TV, book, etc..) but is vague enough that people tend to think that they did in fact hear it. Look at this thread here --- two or three posters have been "sure they heard it " in such-and-such a place, but then have been proven wrong.

A bunch of hooey, I say.

Richard of Chelmsford
2004-Dec-03, 11:14 PM
There is nobody who knows if this statement is true.

Taeolas
2004-Dec-04, 04:38 AM
There is nobody who knows if this statement is true.

Could it be in an edition of one of the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy books?

It seems to me that it could be from that too though I have no idea when/where it might be in them.

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2004-Dec-04, 04:54 AM
There is nobody who knows if this statement is true.

Could it be in an edition of one of the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy books?

It seems to me that it could be from that too though I have no idea when/where it might be in them.

Nope

And I, would know ...

Nethius
2004-Dec-04, 05:47 AM
i read somewhere else it was from the final fantasy 7 game. Aries talking about materia or something. any scripts i found did not have it tho...

maybe it's was something similar, and got changed a little here and there, so maybe it has lots of sources, and not just one?!?

but then again, it does sound familiar

Doe, John
2004-Dec-04, 06:03 AM
Is it maybe from one of those IBM business solutions commercials from about a year ago. They were set in some companies business meetings and featured nonsensical solutions to business problems. Like the universal adaptor. "Works on anything" "Does it work in Europe?" "Uh, you need an adaptor".

Richard of Chelmsford
2004-Dec-06, 12:38 AM
Actually it's from 'Impossibility' by John Barrow.

He says it proves the non-existence of God.

sarongsong
2004-Dec-06, 12:53 AM
Page number?

Makgraf
2004-Dec-06, 01:23 AM
Actually it's from 'Impossibility' by John Barrow.

He says it proves the non-existence of God.
This would just raise more questions as I've never read that book nor (I think) have any of the people I told who recognized it.

I was thinking about this being just a compound quote, that is one that our mind has put together from other ones, and got an idea how we can test it. Tell people the first part of the quote and ask them if they remember it. If they do ask if they can supply the last line. If you get a pretty consistant "That's the beauty of it" it would suggest it's an actual quote.

Richard of Chelmsford
2004-Dec-06, 10:52 PM
Page number?

Page Number 11.

'Impossibility' by

John D. Barrow.

ISBN 0-09-977311-6.

I further quote..

THIS STATEMENT IS NOT KNOWN TO BE TRUE BY ANYONE

'Now consider the plight of our hypothetical Omniscient Being ('Big O'). Suppose first that this statement is true and that Big O does not know it. Then Big O would not be omniscient. So, instead, suppose our statement is false. This means that someone must know the statement to be true; hence it must be true. So regardless of whether we assume at the outset that this statement is true or false, we are forced to conclude that it must be true! And therefore, since the statement is true, nobody (including Big O) can know that it is true. This shows that there must always be true statements that no being can know to be true. Hence there cannot be an Omniscient Being who knows all truths. Nor, by the same argument, could we or our future successors, ever attain such a state of omniscience. All that can be known is all that can be known, not all that is true.'

...unquote.

I put this on a religious site and received in short order something like 300 responses.

Some of them impolite.

Nicolas
2004-Dec-06, 10:53 PM
The Universal adaptor commercial is by far the best IBM commercial I've ever seen.

Makgraf
2004-Dec-07, 12:29 AM
Page number?

Page Number 11.

'Impossibility' by

John D. Barrow.

ISBN 0-09-977311-6.

I further quote..

THIS STATEMENT IS NOT KNOWN TO BE TRUE BY ANYONE

'Now consider the plight of our hypothetical Omniscient Being ('Big O'). Suppose first that this statement is true and that Big O does not know it. Then Big O would not be omniscient. So, instead, suppose our statement is false. This means that someone must know the statement to be true; hence it must be true. So regardless of whether we assume at the outset that this statement is true or false, we are forced to conclude that it must be true! And therefore, since the statement is true, nobody (including Big O) can know that it is true. This shows that there must always be true statements that no being can know to be true. Hence there cannot be an Omniscient Being who knows all truths. Nor, by the same argument, could we or our future successors, ever attain such a state of omniscience. All that can be known is all that can be known, not all that is true.'

...unquote.

I put this on a religious site and received in short order something like 300 responses.

Some of them impolite.



"Oh dear," says God, "I hadn't thought of*that,"* and*promptly vanished in a puff of logic.

"Oh, that was easy," says Man, and for*an*encore*goes*on to prove that black*is white and gets himself killed on the next zebra crossing.

They don't have this book at my library and the amazon exerption only goes up to page 4. Can you post the context for the quote (i.e. right before, the actual thing and right after)?

sarongsong
2004-Dec-07, 01:38 AM
...I further quote..

THIS STATEMENT IS NOT KNOWN TO BE TRUE BY ANYONE

'...This shows that there must always be true statements that no being can know to be true...All that can be known is all that can be known, not all that is true.'

...unquote...

"...Contrariwise," continued Tweedledee, "if it was so, it might be, and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn't, it ain't. That's logic!"
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (Lewis Carroll)

Kebsis
2004-Dec-07, 10:32 AM
Page number?

Page Number 11.

'Impossibility' by

John D. Barrow.

ISBN 0-09-977311-6.

I further quote..

THIS STATEMENT IS NOT KNOWN TO BE TRUE BY ANYONE

'Now consider the plight of our hypothetical Omniscient Being ('Big O'). Suppose first that this statement is true and that Big O does not know it. Then Big O would not be omniscient. So, instead, suppose our statement is false. This means that someone must know the statement to be true; hence it must be true. So regardless of whether we assume at the outset that this statement is true or false, we are forced to conclude that it must be true! And therefore, since the statement is true, nobody (including Big O) can know that it is true. This shows that there must always be true statements that no being can know to be true. Hence there cannot be an Omniscient Being who knows all truths. Nor, by the same argument, could we or our future successors, ever attain such a state of omniscience. All that can be known is all that can be known, not all that is true.'

...unquote.

I put this on a religious site and received in short order something like 300 responses.

Some of them impolite.


...what does that have to do with the quote?

Richard of Chelmsford
2004-Dec-07, 11:19 AM
They don't have this book at my library and the amazon exerption only goes up to page 4. Can you post the context for the quote (i.e. right before, the actual thing and right after)?

Sure will, but not today in detail..funeral arrangements to make.

The paragraph I have quoted comes right after the quote, Magraf. Will include the prior quote presently.

Hitch-hiker's Guide to the Galaxy?

Unfunny cod's wallop.

Richard of Chelmsford
2004-Dec-07, 11:21 AM
...I further quote..

THIS STATEMENT IS NOT KNOWN TO BE TRUE BY ANYONE

'...This shows that there must always be true statements that no being can know to be true...All that can be known is all that can be known, not all that is true.'

...unquote...

"...Contrariwise," continued Tweedledee, "if it was so, it might be, and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn't, it ain't. That's logic!"
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (Lewis Carroll)

Well perhaps you should read a bit more of John Barrow, Sarensong and see how much more you can compare with Lewis Carroll.

Richard of Chelmsford
2004-Dec-07, 11:26 AM
...what does that have to do with the quote?

What has what to do with the quote? The fact that I put it on a religious site, or the attached paragraph?

The attached paragraph follows on from the quote..and I'm afraid I can't add to it reasonably nor detract from it, though I might if I had time to think about it deeply.

Or to dismiss it as some of you have done. Who knows?

The religious website?

Just ranting and aggro I'm afraid.

Kebsis
2004-Dec-07, 01:37 PM
...what does that have to do with the quote?

What has what to do with the quote? The fact that I put it on a religious site, or the attached paragraph?

The attached paragraph follows on from the quote..and I'm afraid I can't add to it reasonably nor detract from it, though I might if I had time to think about it deeply.

Or to dismiss it as some of you have done. Who knows?

The religious website?

Just ranting and aggro I'm afraid.

I just don't know what you're trying to get at with it. Are you saying that THE STATEMENT THAT IS NOT KNOWN TO BE TRUE BY ANYONE is the one from the OP? IE 'What does it do?' 'That's the beauty of it?'

By 'the quote' I meant 'What does it do?' 'That's the beauty of it?'
from the original post.

SeanF
2004-Dec-07, 03:17 PM
THIS STATEMENT IS NOT KNOWN TO BE TRUE BY ANYONE

'Now consider the plight of our hypothetical Omniscient Being ('Big O'). Suppose first that this statement is true and that Big O does not know it. Then Big O would not be omniscient. So, instead, suppose our statement is false. This means that someone must know the statement to be true; hence it must be true. So regardless of whether we assume at the outset that this statement is true or false, we are forced to conclude that it must be true! And therefore, since the statement is true, nobody (including Big O) can know that it is true. This shows that there must always be true statements that no being can know to be true. Hence there cannot be an Omniscient Being who knows all truths. Nor, by the same argument, could we or our future successors, ever attain such a state of omniscience. All that can be known is all that can be known, not all that is true.'

...unquote.

I put this on a religious site and received in short order something like 300 responses.

Some of them impolite.
Did any of them simply point out that the logic does not prohibit the statement from being untrue, and thus does not prohibit omniscience, either?

sarongsong
2004-Dec-07, 04:53 PM
...Well perhaps you should read a bit more of John Barrow, Sarensong and see how much more you can compare with Lewis Carroll.
Yes, thanks for your introduction to this author (and astronomer); I'm off to the bookstore this afternoon and looking forward to viewing more of his work. As this thread's opening quote was somewhat reminiscent of Lewis Carroll, I did a word search of Alice in Wonderland, Through the Looking Glass, The Hunting of the Snark and a couple others---to no avail.

LynnF1
2004-Dec-07, 05:47 PM
Hi!

Am thinking this quote is from some silly-fun sci fi movie like Galaxy Quest or The 5th Element.

And thank you... now my brain, too, will explode because I'm sure I've heard this somewhere before!

Richard of Chelmsford
2004-Dec-07, 11:32 PM
To Kebsis..point taken.

I have digressed a bit from the original point, but hope I can still conclude my part of the thread.

Sarongsong..you're welcome re John Barrow. Good luck with his books ..he tends to specialise in very specific topics which might be hard to discuss in detail..impossibility..the concept of nothingness..the constants we see in nature.

Chaps like us may disparage such as that quote which I threw into the ring, but I don't think he can be dismissed that easily. After all, he is Research Professor of Mathematical Sciences at Cambridge..not a disimilar position to that held by Stephen Hawking, or in years gone by, Isaac Newton.. a cliched argument here might be that that does not guarantee he will talk sense, but if he doesn't then perhaps Cambridge University needs to know about it!

Now, someone asked for a little more from this book..was it you, Magraf?

..quote..

Impossibility, by John Barrow.

'Alan Cromer has argued that the great monotheistic faiths like Islam and Judaism created environments in which science found it hard to develop primarily because they were focused upon deities for whom there was nosense of impossibility:

(From Uncommon Sense, by A. Cromer) "Belief in impossibility is the starting point for logic, deductive mathematics, and natural science. It can originate only in the mind that has freed itself from its own omnipotence."

By contrast, the presence of an omnipotent, interventionist being who is unrestricted by laws of Nature undermines faith in the consistency of nature. A concept of impossibility seems to be a necessary prerequisite for a scientific understanding of the world. This is an interesting argument because it has also been claimed that monotheism provides an environment in which science could flourish because it gave credance to the idea of universal laws of Nature. The decrees of an omniscient deity gave rise to beliefs in laws imposed on things from outside which govern the workings of the world, in opposition to the idea that the things in the world behaved as they did because of their immanent properties. The distinction is significant. If every stone behaves in a manner dictated by its inward nature, or so as to produce harmony with other stones, then every stone should behave differently and there is little motivation to search for habitual behaviours shared by all moving stones. A feature of this position is that while it is consistent with the growth of abstract science and the concept of externally imposed laws of Nature, it does not ensure it. Although there is strong evidence from ancient China that the absence of a monotheistic view hindered the development of mathematical sciences and led to a waning of faith in the underlying unity and rationality of Nature, it is not possible to demonstrate that Western science was an inevitable consequence of the Judaeo-Christian and Islamic cultures in the sense it would not have developed in the absence of their monotheistic beliefs. It may well have been an unexpected by-product of a theistic world-view, but the aims and approaches to the world of these two cultures can be very different. Perhaps, as Oscar Wilde once remarked in a rare moment of seriousness "Religions die when they are proved true. Science is the record of dead religions."

'We began this section by introducing the familiar idea of a god who is omniscient: someone who knows everything. The possibility does not immediately ring alarm bells in our brains; it is plausible that such a being could exist. Yet, when it is probed more closely one can show that omniscience of this sort creates a logical paradox and must, by the standards of human reason, therefore be judged impossible or be qualified in some way. To see this consider this test statement:

THIS STATEMENT IS NOT KNOWN TO BE TRUE BY ANYONE....'

..unquote.

Now, put all of that in your pipe, and smoke it. :)

Doe, John
2004-Dec-08, 01:21 AM
To Kebsis..point taken.

I have digressed a bit from the original point, but hope I can still conclude my part of the thread.

<snip>

THIS STATEMENT IS NOT KNOWN TO BE TRUE BY ANYONE....'

..unquote.

Now, put all of that in your pipe, and smoke it. :)
Richard of Chelmsford please stop trying to hi-jack this thread

Richard of Chelmsford
2004-Dec-08, 01:35 AM
It's not your thread, is it, John Doe, and Magraf, the author of the thread has asked me for more details following my contribution.

I'm not trying to hi-jack the thread..goodness knows, it's easy enough to start a new one..I'm trying to put in some imput which, though not connected with the original quote, bears some similarity (in spirit) to it and so may widen the sphere of interest.

Sorry if you don't like it.

Makgraf
2004-Dec-08, 07:11 AM
It's not your thread, is it, John Doe, and Magraf, the author of the thread has asked me for more details following my contribution.

I'm not trying to hi-jack the thread..goodness knows, it's easy enough to start a new one..I'm trying to put in some imput which, though not connected with the original quote, bears some similarity (in spirit) to it and so may widen the sphere of interest.

Sorry if you don't like it.
Wait so the quote isn't in Impossibility?

Ut
2004-Dec-08, 08:09 AM
Hrmm. Then I'm sticking to Futurama until I can get to those DVDs.

Richard of Chelmsford
2004-Dec-08, 10:33 AM
It's not your thread, is it, John Doe, and Magraf, the author of the thread has asked me for more details following my contribution.

I'm not trying to hi-jack the thread..goodness knows, it's easy enough to start a new one..I'm trying to put in some imput which, though not connected with the original quote, bears some similarity (in spirit) to it and so may widen the sphere of interest.

Sorry if you don't like it.
Wait so the quote isn't in Impossibility?

Oh. No, I'm afraid it's not, Makgraf. As I said to Mr Doe I was just trying to broaden the area of interest a bit.

Perhaps then, on balance, I should open a new 'Impossibility' thread in due course and address myself to helping you find the origins of your quote.

It'll be around somewhere.

Richard of Chelmsford
2004-Dec-08, 10:43 AM
I might have got it.

Desmond Bagley.

He was a British thriller writer of the sixties and seventies..he seems to have vanished now..I haven't done a search on him, but I will after this post.

I can't remember the name of the book this quote was from, but it was made into a film starring Paul Newman and the name of the book was changed..got it.. 'The Mackintosh Man'..I think James Mason was in it as the baddie.

Now, I don't know if this was an actual quote from the book or film, but something along these lines must have been said, because a thread which ran through the book concerned an electronic gadget which the FBI or MI6 or whoever had got hold of. They gave it to all their top scientists to find out what it was for. None could find out, till at length they found out that "it did nothing..that's the beauty of it,"

The reason being that all the top scientists were so busy trying to figure out what this thing was that they missed out on what was really going on in the nefarious world of espionage that the book portrayed.

Might be right. Might be wrong. :-?

Richard of Chelmsford
2004-Dec-08, 10:54 AM
It might have been 'Running Blind' or 'The Freedom Trap' (aka The Mackintosh Man.)

pghnative
2004-Dec-08, 02:41 PM
Urban legend, folks. I hope no one is losing sleep over this. A half dozen boards are discussing it, and all of them full of postings which state "I just know I've heard this somewhere", yet no one can come up with the answer.

Who knows, maybe this line was spoken in some B-movie from the 70's, but it's pretty obvious that 99+% of the people who "just know" they've heard it, actually haven't heard it.

SeanF
2004-Dec-08, 03:15 PM
Perhaps then, on balance, I should open a new 'Impossibility' thread in due course and address myself to helping you find the origins of your quote.
If you do start a new thread, let me know. It seems to me that Mr. Barrow's logic is rather fundamentally flawed . . .

Richard of Chelmsford
2004-Dec-08, 08:57 PM
Perhaps then, on balance, I should open a new 'Impossibility' thread in due course and address myself to helping you find the origins of your quote.
If you do start a new thread, let me know. It seems to me that Mr. Barrow's logic is rather fundamentally flawed . . .

I will open another thread but I'll clear it with the BA first as it may infringe some of the rules.

Can you say how Mr Barrow's logic is flawed from what you've seen so far?

SeanF
2004-Dec-08, 09:33 PM
Perhaps then, on balance, I should open a new 'Impossibility' thread in due course and address myself to helping you find the origins of your quote.
If you do start a new thread, let me know. It seems to me that Mr. Barrow's logic is rather fundamentally flawed . . .

I will open another thread but I'll clear it with the BA first as it may infringe some of the rules.

Can you say how Mr Barrow's logic is flawed from what you've seen so far?
Well, hopefully, as long as we stick to the logic and not get into the theology of it, we'll be okay. :)

I'm trying to work out the best way to say what I'm thinking, but I think I'll wait for a new thread rather than hijack this one any further . . .

Richard of Chelmsford
2004-Dec-09, 09:11 AM
Perhaps then, on balance, I should open a new 'Impossibility' thread in due course and address myself to helping you find the origins of your quote.
If you do start a new thread, let me know. It seems to me that Mr. Barrow's logic is rather fundamentally flawed . . .

I will open another thread but I'll clear it with the BA first as it may infringe some of the rules.

Can you say how Mr Barrow's logic is flawed from what you've seen so far?
Well, hopefully, as long as we stick to the logic and not get into the theology of it, we'll be okay. :)

I'm trying to work out the best way to say what I'm thinking, but I think I'll wait for a new thread rather than hijack this one any further . . .

The BA says 'nay.'

The topic would infringe forum rules.

I will post the topic on another site presently and let you know, SeanF.

Richard of Chelmsford
2004-Dec-09, 09:16 AM
Urban legend, folks. I hope no one is losing sleep over this. A half dozen boards are discussing it, and all of them full of postings which state "I just know I've heard this somewhere", yet no one can come up with the answer.

Who knows, maybe this line was spoken in some B-movie from the 70's, but it's pretty obvious that 99+% of the people who "just know" they've heard it, actually haven't heard it.

So 'The Mackintosh Man' was a B-movie?

I'll have you know some of the action tool place here in Chelmsford..Chelmsford prison to be precise (!) so it must have been at the cutting edge of the cinematic medium. :lol: :lol: :lol:

I don't know about 'Richard of Chelmsford'

..more like 'Paul Newman of Chelmsford' in this instance. :-?

JFM
2004-Dec-09, 09:22 AM
Just to go back to the OP. The qoute was used in the Simpsons. Episode 7f22; Blood Fued

I've tried to find the quote on Simpsons sites, but can't as yet. How do I know this? It was on TV yesterday.

SeanF
2004-Dec-09, 02:59 PM
I will post the topic on another site presently and let you know, SeanF.
I don't know if you're already registered over at FWIS (http://loresinger.com/FWIS/index.php), but it'd fit in fine over there . . .

Makgraf
2004-Dec-09, 05:28 PM
Just to go back to the OP. The qoute was used in the Simpsons. Episode 7f22; Blood Fued

I've tried to find the quote on Simpsons sites, but can't as yet. How do I know this? It was on TV yesterday.
This seems like it's it!
From 23:47 into it (including commercials):


Homer: Marge, what does it do?
Marge: It doesn't do anything.

Seems like a winner!

pghnative
2004-Dec-09, 05:46 PM
Just to go back to the OP. The qoute was used in the Simpsons. Episode 7f22; Blood Fued

I've tried to find the quote on Simpsons sites, but can't as yet. How do I know this? It was on TV yesterday.
This seems like it's it!
From 23:47 into it (including commercials):


Homer: Marge, what does it do?
Marge: It doesn't do anything.

Seems like a winner!Except that's not the full quote. It's missing "That's the beauty of it".

Richard of Chelmsford
2004-Dec-10, 09:49 AM
I will post the topic on another site presently and let you know, SeanF.
I don't know if you're already registered over at FWIS (http://loresinger.com/FWIS/index.php), but it'd fit in fine over there . . .

I had a quick butchers at FWIS..lots of familiar names there.

However, I've decided to post the topic on infidels.org..The Secular Web.

It's a bit of a humourless site, but it's always got stacks of posters, most of whom make lots of sense on both sides of the argument.

I'll give you a link for the site, SeanF to give you a chance to look over the site. Then Click 'Forum' then 'Existence of God' then my thread '10 Words Which Disprove the Existence of God.'

NOTE: I've lost my 'd' on my handle over there. They've got me booked as 'Richard of Chelmsfor.'

:)

http://www.infidels.org

JFM
2004-Dec-10, 04:35 PM
Just to go back to the OP. The qoute was used in the Simpsons. Episode 7f22; Blood Fued

I've tried to find the quote on Simpsons sites, but can't as yet. How do I know this? It was on TV yesterday.
This seems like it's it!
From 23:47 into it (including commercials):


Homer: Marge, what does it do?
Marge: It doesn't do anything.

Seems like a winner!Except that's not the full quote. It's missing "That's the beauty of it".



You're right. I heard Homer ask, Marge reply and just thought, "That's it"...........Oh well #-o

Makgraf
2004-Dec-11, 01:01 AM
Just to go back to the OP. The qoute was used in the Simpsons. Episode 7f22; Blood Fued

I've tried to find the quote on Simpsons sites, but can't as yet. How do I know this? It was on TV yesterday.
This seems like it's it!
From 23:47 into it (including commercials):


Homer: Marge, what does it do?
Marge: It doesn't do anything.

Seems like a winner!Except that's not the full quote. It's missing "That's the beauty of it".
I think this could very well be what the orginal request was based on. Guy remembering this quote (It's a classic Simpsons episode the one with "Alright Mr Burns, what's your first name?" "I... don't... know...") but subconciously mixes it in with the "That's the beauty of it" from Star Trek 4.

The only problem is that a lot of people remember it with a stress on the "do" which wasn't in the Simpsons line. So it is possible that there the Simpson's isn't Patient Zero in this internet outbreak, but there's some ur-source with the whole thing and the stress.

jami cat
2004-Dec-12, 03:35 AM
Last year someone on imdb asked where this quote was from:

"What does it do?"
"It doesn't do anything. That's the beauty of it"
To this day no one has been able to figure out where it's from though everyone remembers having have heard it.

If anything here knows please help my brain from exploding with the pain.

Hmm?
It sounds like something, "Kramer" from Sinefeld would say.

Jerry- So what does it do?
Kramer- What do you mean "what" does it do?
George- Yea, it must do something. What does it do?
Kramer- It doesn't "do" anything, I'm telling you. Thats the beauty of it.
Jerry- I see. So, something that does nothing is going to change the face
of humanity in some special way?
Kramer- Exactly!
George-(flails arms about) My God! Why didn't I think of that.


Although I made this up, it does sounds pretty fitting when you put it in context. :)

sarongsong
2004-Dec-12, 07:20 AM
...from Sinefeld would say...Although I made this up, it does sounds pretty fitting when you put it in context. :)
Yes, it does, good job!---I can also hear the voice of Danny DeVito reciting the line, too.