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sarongsong
2004-Dec-02, 03:57 PM
Virgin Atlantic GlobalFlyer
http://virginatlanticglobalflyer.com/

sarongsong
2005-Jan-10, 12:58 PM
"... Friday's flight (http://www.avweb.com/eletter/archives/avflash/333-full.html#188931) was something of a shakedown for the plane and was flown at 47,000 feet. The flight profile called for a long, slow descent (400 fpm) and Air Traffic Control elected to let eight other planes land before allowing the descent..."
http://www.avweb.com/newspics/globalflyeraloft.jpg

sarongsong
2005-Jan-27, 08:23 AM
GlobalFlyer to launch February 6.

sarongsong
2005-Feb-26, 04:44 PM
"Mission Status: Condition GREEN (http://www.virginatlanticglobalflyer.com/) Monday, February 28
...take off is highly likely between 2pm and 6pm local time (20:00UTC and 00:00UTC) on that day.
All remaining project personnel not in Salina should now report to Mission Control..."
"...postponed again (http://www.avweb.com/eletter/archives/avflash/356-full.html#189238); unfavorable ground winds cited. Next window now is March 1-3..."
[also Wanted - Spotters for circumnavigation (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=410527&highlight=globalflyer#41052 7)]

enginelessjohn
2005-Feb-28, 01:35 PM
From http://www.virginatlanticglobalflyer.com/ at 13:30 UTC



Mission Status:Condition GREEN Monday, February 28

Monday is go for take off somewhere between 2pm and 6pm local time (20:00UTC and 00:00UTC). The full project team and media are in place in Salina. The precise planned take off time will be decided mid-morning.

Cheers
John

jamestox
2005-Feb-28, 04:41 PM
Hmmmm...."solo, unrefueled flight around the world...."

Hey, wouldn't that honor go to Yuri Gagarin? :-k

Or John Glenn?

Stregone
2005-Feb-28, 07:58 PM
Orbiting isn't flying.

sarongsong
2005-Mar-01, 01:52 AM
2-28-05 (http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/nat-gen/2005/feb/28/022802799.html)
"Steve Fossett took off Monday night...from the Salina Municipal Airport about 6:45 p.m...would fly over Chicago, Detroit and Canada before heading across the Atlantic...Africa, the Middle East, India, China and the Pacific Ocean...will attempt to break seven other aviation records, including the longest flight by a jet aircraft..."

kucharek
2005-Mar-01, 10:44 AM
Is there anywhere a life update or something like that? It seems, http://www.virginatlanticglobalflyer.com/ is swamped and unreachable.

Harald

[added] Finally got through, but very slow.

http://www.solarmetrics.com/Public/Portal/content/WebSite/Pages/VAGFLive.html
has also updated positions. Seems he already had to change his course a lot

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Mar-01, 02:44 PM
Is there anywhere a life update or something like that? It seems, http://www.virginatlanticglobalflyer.com/ is swamped and unreachable.
That webpage now reports


Mission Status: 12:31UTC at Mission Control. Elapsed Journey time: 11 hours 45 minutes. Distance covered approximately 3,564 nautical miles.

Steve is now at 44,100ft, flying over the Atlantic Ocean and should approach the African coastline in an hour and a half.

Let's see, that was about two hours ago, so he should be over Africa.


http://www.solarmetrics.com/Public/Portal/content/WebSite/Pages/VAGFLive.html
has also updated positions. Seems he already had to change his course a lot
That shows he veered to head north, towards the Med, not yet near Africa, updated ten minutes ago (14:35:00)

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Mar-01, 03:46 PM
Half an hour ago:


Mission Status: 15:07UTC at Mission Control. Elapsed Journey time: 14 hours 20 minutes. Distance covered approximately 44,00 nautical miles.

Steve is now flying at 44,866ft, and still climbing as he has permission to go to 47,000 ft. Now in Moroccan airspace

sarongsong
2005-Mar-02, 06:11 AM
Live video feeds (http://www.virginatlanticglobalflyer.com/MissionControl/Tracking/#video)

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Mar-02, 11:40 AM
Twenty minutes ago:

Mission Status: 11:18UTC at Mission Control. Elapsed Journey time: 34 hours 31 minutes. Distance covered approximately 11,094 nautical miles.

The airplane itself is slowing down but using the benefit of the wind to maintain his ground speed. He has jusst flown ove Kunming in China

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Mar-02, 02:25 PM
Just grabbed this:


Mission Status: 23:34UTC at Mission Control. Elapsed Journey time: 36 hours 47minutes. Distance covered approximately 11,645 nautical miles.

Steve is tavelling at 325knots/ 373mph at an altitue of 45,400 ft. He is 250 miles west of the East China Sea.
Is their clock screwed up? or is it just me?

Cylinder
2005-Mar-02, 03:06 PM
Fuel Fears Foil Fossett's Flight?


It looks like a fuel problem may very well cause an abort on Japan or Hawaii according to MSNBC. It seems like the Global Flyer has already expended its contingency budget of fuel and unless it maintains favorable winds will not be able to make the home leg. Fingers crossed.

cyswxman
2005-Mar-02, 03:36 PM
I can't find anything about a fuel shortage. Latest that I saw was that he has only used about 1/4 of his fuel supply, and is over halfway around.

Cylinder
2005-Mar-02, 03:43 PM
I can't find anything about a fuel shortage. Latest that I saw was that he has only used about 1/4 of his fuel supply, and is over halfway around.

MSNBC has been running the story all morning. The segment they just aired 2 minutes ago had one of the flight managers stating that a certain degree of tailwind will be needed to complete the mission safely. I'll see if I can dig up a link.

Cylinder
2005-Mar-02, 03:49 PM
OK, I found the BBC story (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4312059.stm) posted less than an hour ago.


Steve Fossett's attempt to fly solo, non-stop around the globe without re-fuelling is in trouble. His GlobalFlyer plane has reached China - half way around the world - but he has insufficient fuel to get him home to Kansas without favourable winds. Mission controllers will have to decide whether to call off the attempt before Fossett heads out over the Pacific. The adventurer left the US on Tuesday at 0500 GMT and was expected to return to the Salina airport on Thursday. "I don't have a high level of confidence at the moment," Steve Fossett said from GlobalFlyer.


There is some confusion apparently about where the "missing" 1200kg of fuel went. The current speculation seems to be that the plane was either incorrectly fueled before takeoff :o or that it unexpectedly burned a large amount of fuel on ascent.

cyswxman
2005-Mar-02, 03:53 PM
Hmm. Well, there appears to be a good jet stream (120-130 kts), which he is
getting close to now, that extends about halfway across the Pacific.

Cylinder
2005-Mar-02, 03:53 PM
I also found this Scotsman article (http://news.scotsman.com/latest.cfm?id=4199733).



The fuel disappeared in the first three and a half hours of flight but the aircraft’s engineers tried to ignore the problem.

Chief engineer and test pilot Jon Karkow said: “It has been very puzzling to us but we weren’t going to admit to ourselves that there was a problem.”

Fossett, 60, took off on Monday evening with 18,000lbs on board and after 37 hours of flight has just 5,500lbs left in his tanks.

Cylinder
2005-Mar-02, 03:59 PM
Maybe this is all a Richard Branson publicity stunt. :lol:

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Mar-02, 04:01 PM
Just grabbed this:


Mission Status: 23:34UTC at Mission Control. Elapsed Journey time: 36 hours 47minutes. Distance covered approximately 11,645 nautical miles.

Steve is tavelling at 325knots/ 373mph at an altitue of 45,400 ft. He is 250 miles west of the East China Sea.
Is their clock screwed up? or is it just me?
Sent them an email. :)

The website now reads:


Mission Status: 13:34UTC at Mission Control. Elapsed Journey time: 36 hours 47minutes. Distance covered approximately 11,645 nautical miles.

Steve is tavelling at 325knots/ 373mph at an altitue of 45,400 ft. He is 250 miles west of the East China Sea.
With the fuel and all, it looks like they'll need some new programmers. :)

cyswxman
2005-Mar-02, 04:02 PM
It does seem odd. The Virgin Atlantic GlobalFlyer website has no mention of anything wrong, and he is passing over southern Japan now.

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Mar-02, 04:04 PM
It does seem odd. The Virgin Atlantic GlobalFlyer website has no mention of anything wrong, and he is passing over southern Japan now.
It says "A supply of diet milkshakes, simulated rest and good health are key for this physical endurance test."

Simulated rest? :)

Cylinder
2005-Mar-02, 04:25 PM
Now there's a story (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,3-1508013,00.html) on the Times Online:


Mr Fossett, 60, took off on Monday evening with 18,000lbs of fuel on board for the estimated 80 hour flight. After 37 hours in the air he has just 5,500lbs left in his tanks.

Talking from the cockpit of the plane as he flew over Chinese air space, he said: "This is a huge setback, to think that we might not have the fuel to make it back for the rest of the flight.

"I immediately started thinking about what the alternatives were - whether a shorter route could be taken through Mexico, for example, and whether it is possible to fly with the engine out."

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Mar-02, 04:41 PM
37 hours? The website still is stuck on 36 hrs 47 min--they must be scrambling around like crazy.

Cylinder
2005-Mar-02, 04:47 PM
What site are you looking at?

Cylinder
2005-Mar-02, 05:39 PM
OK - CNN is covering this story now. The project manager stated that the go/no go decision for the Pacific leg will have to occur within the next hour. CNN is planning to cover this announcement live.

Cylinder
2005-Mar-02, 06:22 PM
MSNBC has a story (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7066507/) up now. They will make the abort decision over Hawaii at 2:00PM ET.


“There’s a big go, no-go decision that the team has to make,” project manager Paul Moore said.

While Moore and other mission controllers continued to review the data in Kansas, Fossett headed eastward from Japan over the Pacific Ocean in his GlobalFlyer airplane. Once Fossett reaches Hawaii, he'll decide whether to continue heading east for the U.S. mainland. A decision wasn’t expected to be announced until 2 p.m. ET.

I guess the upside (for me anyway) is if they do abort, the USAF and B-52 get to keep an aviation record.

Cylinder
2005-Mar-02, 07:46 PM
The program director just announced that they will fly at least the first of the Pacific legs to Hawaii at which point they will have to decide if they can risk flying to the west coast of North America. They seemed to indicate that GlobalFlyer would most likely not make the final leg back to Kansas though nothing has been decided at this point.

publiusr
2005-Mar-02, 07:50 PM
I remember how the Voyager craft had drooping wings, leading to skids that allowed the wingtips to tear off in flight.

I think this thing might break up on landing.

I liked the REMAX weather balloon attempt. He could have done good science with that behemoth.

This thing is a useless stunt. It might make a good cheap UAV body, but that is about the size of it.

01101001
2005-Mar-02, 08:33 PM
The program director just announced that they will fly at least the first of the Pacific legs to Hawaii at which point they will have to decide if they can risk flying to the west coast of North America. They seemed to indicate that GlobalFlyer would most likely not make the final leg back to Kansas though nothing has been decided at this point.
They should land it in Salinas, California. Maybe no one will notice it took off from Salina, Kansas.

sarongsong
2005-Mar-02, 09:01 PM
GF sim (http://www.virginatlanticglobalflyer.com/ScienceAviation/vVAGF.jsp) available:
"Early in 2004, the idea of a virtual version of Steve Fossett's record attempt was simultaneously mooted by both the GlobalFlyer project team, and...Aeroplane Heaven in Brisbane, Australia...For full details of the simulator [for FS2002/2004], and downloads, go to the Virtual Virgin Atlantic GlobalFlyer site by Aeroplane Heaven (http://www.theheavenlyhangar.com/READMORE/GLOBFLYER/index.htm)..."

cyswxman
2005-Mar-02, 11:11 PM
Just passed 180°. Back over the western hemisphere, about 2800km from Honolulu.

Nicolas
2005-Mar-02, 11:18 PM
I opened the sim site and got this

"One Pilot"
'3 Days"
"18000 lbs of fuel"

Somehow that last thing made me smile... :)

sarongsong
2005-Mar-03, 04:00 AM
Yeah, it sounds odd to see fuel measured in pounds instead of gallons.
"...mysterious fuel leak somehow caused...to lose 2600 lbs of fuel within the first three and a half hours of the flight...now completed 79 percent of the journey...Distance to Salina 4749 miles...If...decides to travel past Honolulu he will have a distance of 2,610 miles to...the first available airstrip...on Catalina Island...22 miles off the coast of Southern California...would have a glide ratio of about 200 miles..."

Cylinder
2005-Mar-03, 04:33 AM
According to this MSNBC story (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7066507/), the decision to risk the final Pacific leg to North America may be announced at 11:00PM ET:


During an afternoon news briefing, Fossett told journalists he was "feeling a lot better" about his chances than when the problem was discovered. He also said his physical condition was good, although he felt "very much sleep-deprived."

Moore explained that the fuel sensors in the plane's 13 tanks differed from readings of how quickly the plane’s single jet engine was burning fuel. The crew was forced to assume that 2,600 pounds (1,180 kilograms) of the original 18,100 pounds (8,227 kilograms) of fuel “disappeared” early in the flight, he said. It wasn’t clear whether the problem was with the instruments that track how much fuel remains or if some fuel had been lost because of a leak or accidental venting.

Once Fossett reaches Hawaii, he'll decide whether to land there or keep flying, based on the updated assessments of fuel supplies and wind conditions, Moore said. Fossett's Web site showed that he was north of Hawaii on Wednesday evening, heading east-southeast. A news briefing was set for 11 p.m. ET to discuss the mission's status.

From the same article it seems they were transferring fuel into the crafts central tanks, which seems (to me anyway) to point toward fuel loss instead of instumentation failure. Fossett is still 15% under budget for the fuel required to complete its mission.

sarongsong
2005-Mar-03, 05:22 AM
East of Hawaii:
"...Steve says 'go for it' to landing at Salina...Tail winds stronger than expected..."

kucharek
2005-Mar-03, 07:07 AM
Yeah, it sounds odd to see fuel measured in pounds instead of gallons.

AFAIK, in such cases it is important to know how much mass you carry and how much enrgy it has. That depends on mass, not volume. Cold fuel has a higher density than warm fuel. IIRC, in F-1 races the amount of fuel is limited by volume, so they tanl cooled fuel to get in as much as possible.

Harald

01101001
2005-Mar-03, 07:35 AM
I guess the upside (for me anyway) is if they do abort, the USAF and B-52 get to keep an aviation record.
The King is dead. Long live the King!

virginatlanticglobalflyer.com: One down, more to go! (http://www.virginatlanticglobalflyer.com/News/record!.jsp)


Steve Fossett has proved once more that he is a record breaking adventurer. At 18:01 UTC when he reached Ferar, Steve broke the world record for "distance without landing" which was last set in 1962 by a B-52.

sarongsong
2005-Mar-03, 08:40 AM
...AFAIK, in such cases it is important to know how much mass you carry and how much energy it has. That depends on mass, not volume...
Agreed:
LP-gas 4.2 pounds per US gallon
gasoline 5.6 pounds
diesel fuel 6.8 pounds
kerosene 6.7 pounds
Wonder if the pre-flight weigh-in gymnastics (http://www.globalflyer.com/News/Plane_Weigh-in.jsp) contributed to the 'missing' fuel problem that was later attributed to a leak.

captain swoop
2005-Mar-03, 10:24 AM
This thing is a useless stunt. It might make a good cheap UAV body, but that is about the size of it.

In that case any race with specialised equipment is useless. What can an F1 car or a racing Trimaran be used for other than racing?

Doodler
2005-Mar-03, 02:34 PM
I remember how the Voyager craft had drooping wings, leading to skids that allowed the wingtips to tear off in flight.

I think this thing might break up on landing.

I liked the REMAX weather balloon attempt. He could have done good science with that behemoth.

This thing is a useless stunt. It might make a good cheap UAV body, but that is about the size of it.

Dang son, have you got a bone to pick with anything that flies more than ten feet off the ground that isn't a Russian built heavy lift booster?

Nicolas
2005-Mar-03, 03:33 PM
I opened the sim site and got this

"One Pilot"
'3 Days"
"18000 lbs of fuel"

Somehow that last thing made me smile... :)

I just siad that beacuse at the time, there was a theory that they hadn't tanked enough fuel...

sarongsong
2005-Mar-03, 03:33 PM
"...over eastern Arizona..."

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Mar-03, 03:42 PM
From the website:

Catalina Island @ 13:21 UTC (in the dark)
Los Angeles, CA (South of) @ 13:36 UTC (in the dark)
Kingman, AZ (North of) @ 14:55 UTC
Farmington, NM @ 16:15 UTC
Garden City, KS @ 18:19 UTC
Salina, KS @ 19:17 UTC (14:17 local time)
What is it, 15:42 already?

Cylinder
2005-Mar-03, 03:52 PM
[tinfoil hat]

I cannot help but suspecting that this "fuel problem" was a publicity stunt to get GlobalFlyer back in the news rotation.

[/tinfoil hat]


It will be a great acomplishment, though. I will grudge the circumnavigation record (http://www.boeing.com/defense-space/military/b52-strat/b52_50th/story2.htm) lost by the USAF and the BUFF.

cyswxman
2005-Mar-03, 03:54 PM
That should be 13:17 Local Standard Time for Salina, KS. (6 hours behind UTC).

Candy
2005-Mar-03, 04:01 PM
I opened the sim site and got this

"One Pilot"
'3 Days"
"18000 lbs of fuel"

Somehow that last thing made me smile... :)

I just siad that beacuse at the time, there was a theory that they hadn't tanked enough fuel...
I thought you meant having gas made you smile. :lol:

captain swoop
2005-Mar-03, 04:19 PM
I opened the sim site and got this

"One Pilot"
'3 Days"
"18000 lbs of fuel"

)

It's dark

And we're wearing shades...

cyswxman
2005-Mar-03, 04:39 PM
Over southern Colorado now. Less than 500 miles to go!

voyager_3
2005-Mar-03, 04:40 PM
Here's a link to a BBC i story

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4313645.stm

He is scheduled to land at 19:20 GMT. Good luck Steve!

Candy
2005-Mar-03, 04:48 PM
Here's a link to a BBC i story

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4313645.stm

He is scheduled to land at 19:20 GMT. Good luck Steve!

"I've gotten minimal naps while keeping my eyes on the instruments," he added.
I bet that feels funny. :o

Seriously, Fossett is quite the man, and that's one cool bird he's flying. =D>

cyswxman
2005-Mar-03, 05:10 PM
Descending now, just went below 40Kft. Now emerging over the plains of southeast Colorado.

cyswxman
2005-Mar-03, 05:14 PM
Currently in Salina, KS.
Clear skies, 54 degrees with a 6 kt northwesterly wind.

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Mar-03, 05:25 PM
That should be 13:17 Local Standard Time for Salina, KS. (6 hours behind UTC).
They're haveing a tough time with time zones. Lucky thing he wasn't trying to do it in 80 days. :)

They have it right now:


Garden City, KS @ 18:19 UTC
Salina, KS @ 19:17 UTC (13:17 local time)

cyswxman
2005-Mar-03, 05:44 PM
Crossing into southwest Kansas now. Less than 250 miles to go.

DodgerDean
2005-Mar-03, 06:08 PM
Hmm, 2,700 gallons of fuel over 23,000 miles = 8.5 mpg...

Not too shabby I suppose.

cyswxman
2005-Mar-03, 06:44 PM
Less than 100 miles to go. Will he make it?



:wink:

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Mar-03, 06:46 PM
He can glide that far, right? :)

Nicolas
2005-Mar-03, 06:48 PM
He can glide that far, right? :)

If he's still high enough and atmospheric conditions aren't too bad, indeed he can.

Will he make it?? (that remark makes it sound like a cheap TV quiz, doesn't it? :))

cyswxman
2005-Mar-03, 07:12 PM
Curiously, he is actually flying away from Salina now.

Nicolas
2005-Mar-03, 07:15 PM
Curiously, he is actually flying away from Salina now.

He's pushing his luck :) Or WAY too much tailwind blew him away?

Seriously, I guess he's just following the best winds for the final part of the trip.

DodgerDean
2005-Mar-03, 07:16 PM
MSNBC has some great video (free, no bandwidth trouble)

sarongsong
2005-Mar-03, 07:22 PM
Yes, their weatherman just remarked Fossett rode the 'Pineapple Express' in from Hawaii and that the plane could land within 1,000' of runway...

Cylinder
2005-Mar-03, 07:31 PM
Landing on CNN right now!

R.A.F.
2005-Mar-03, 07:48 PM
=D> =D> =D> =D> =D>

Cylinder
2005-Mar-03, 07:49 PM
He's back.

cyswxman
2005-Mar-03, 07:50 PM
Landed safely. 19:49 UTC. =D> =D> =D>

Cylinder
2005-Mar-03, 07:59 PM
The announcer on CNN wanted to know what the big red thingy was on top of the fuselage. :oops:

01101001
2005-Mar-03, 08:03 PM
Oh my God, they lost his luggage!

sarongsong
2005-Mar-03, 08:15 PM
:D He was the luggage! =D> =D> =D>

Nicolas
2005-Mar-03, 08:23 PM
The announcer on CNN wanted to know what the big red thingy was on top of the fuselage. :oops:

Nooooooo

"that red thing is a special device, which sucks in fuel and burns it away, which reduced the aircraft wieght and hence increases the performance. In fact this unit is so good, it had digested almost all fuel by the end of the trip, hence creating a very low weight plane. Obviously this unit needs a lot of cooling air, as can be seen by the fan it incorporates". :roll:

Doodler
2005-Mar-03, 09:42 PM
The announcer on CNN wanted to know what the big red thingy was on top of the fuselage. :oops:

Nooooooo

"that red thing is a special device, which sucks in fuel and burns it away, which reduced the aircraft wieght and hence increases the performance. In fact this unit is so good, it had digested almost all fuel by the end of the trip, hence creating a very low weight plane. Obviously this unit needs a lot of cooling air, as can be seen by the fan it incorporates". :roll:

=D> =D> =D> =D> =D> =D> =D> =D> =D>

Oh man, i need to know who dared to ask that one on camera!

W.F. Tomba
2005-Mar-04, 05:21 AM
Fossett makes history, CNN makes errors (http://www.cnn.com/2005/TECH/03/03/globalflyer.fossett/index.html)

Evan
2005-Mar-04, 06:11 AM
Judging by the signage on the red thing it was an advertising billboard that they reluctantly carried around the world. Extra weight you know...

sarongsong
2005-Mar-04, 06:59 AM
Yeah, but they probably got the Williams International (http://www.williams-int.com/high/about/) engine for nada. Seems they have some fairly ambitious plans (http://www.williams-int.com/high/about/):
"...Last fall under a competitive procurement program among jet engine companies, NASA selected Williams International to join NASA in a $100 million cooperative effort to revitalize the once-flourishing light aircraft industry..."

Evan
2005-Mar-04, 07:13 AM
Not gonna happen. The light aircraft industry has been killed by the insurance industry.

kucharek
2005-Mar-04, 10:02 AM
Not gonna happen. The light aircraft industry has been killed by the insurance industry.
Maybe only indirect. The true culprit may be liability with absurd sums when something happens.

Nicolas
2005-Mar-04, 10:08 AM
Not gonna happen. The light aircraft industry has been killed by the insurance industry.
Maybe only indirect. The true culprit may be liability with absurd sums when something happens.

That's the one indeed.

"You made a plane that doesn't work: It flew into a mountain."

"Person 1: Your engine makes noise A dB, you should stay under B dB". "OK fixed: under bdB now". "Person 2: your engine makes too much noise, it should stay under C dB" etcetc. Result: a very expensive and less powerful, making the 172 effectively an expensive three seater...

The examples are numerous.

Doodler
2005-Mar-04, 03:30 PM
Not gonna happen. The light aircraft industry has been killed by the insurance industry.
Maybe only indirect. The true culprit may be liability with absurd sums when something happens.

Agree, insurance is all well and fine for covering what its intended to cover, the torte lottery needs to be shut down.

Evan
2005-Mar-04, 03:49 PM
The "lottery" is easily fixed. In Canada you can sue for actual damages plus a maximum of $300,000 for "pain and suffering" and punitive damages. That's it. The maximum is rarely awarded. What sucks is that it doesn't make our rates cheaper as they are based on US claims experience.

Doodler
2005-Mar-04, 03:55 PM
The "lottery" is easily fixed. In Canada you can sue for actual damages plus a maximum of $300,000 for "pain and suffering" and punitive damages. That's it. The maximum is rarely awarded. What sucks is that it doesn't make our rates cheaper as they are based on US claims experience.

It would be nice to have that kind of logic applied on this side of the border.

sarongsong
2005-Mar-04, 05:26 PM
Hadn't considered the insurance/liability issue before, not owning a plane, but good point in light of my auto insurance rates. Yikes!
While 'Space' is what most people associate with NASA, the 'Aeronautics' seems to be getting the short end:
February 27, 2005 (http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/custom/space/orl-asecnasa27022705feb27,1,3775855.story)
"...Less than 6 percent of NASA's $16.2 billion budget for 2005 will be spent on aeronautics. Although research funding already has been slashed by almost 60 percent since 1994, even deeper cuts are planned..."

Nicolas
2005-Mar-04, 05:52 PM
A sidenote concerning that figures is that aeronautics research often is cheaper than space research, which needs to be taken into account.

kucharek
2005-Mar-04, 06:01 PM
Hadn't considered the insurance/liability issue before, not owning a plane, but good point in light of my auto insurance rates. Yikes!
While 'Space' is what most people associate with NASA, the 'Aeronautics' seems to be getting the short end:
February 27, 2005 (http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/custom/space/orl-asecnasa27022705feb27,1,3775855.story)
"...Less than 6 percent of NASA's $16.2 billion budget for 2005 will be spent on aeronautics. Although research funding already has been slashed by almost 60 percent since 1994, even deeper cuts are planned..."

No Aeronautics or Science Agency (http://www.nasawatch.com/archives/2005/02/#000638)

sarongsong
2005-Mar-04, 06:10 PM
Great site, kucharek!---still chuckling:
"...WARNING! This is not a NASA Website. You might learn something..."

Stregone
2005-Mar-04, 10:48 PM
I wonder how far that thing could have covered while gliding in ground effects. I didn't see the landing, but I heard they used a small chute to slow it down before it even got on the ground.

sarongsong
2005-Mar-24, 09:44 AM
"...The mystery of the missing fuel...it was lost overboard due to an error in the placement of fuel vents, Fossett said. When the air in the tanks expanded at high altitudes, fuel instead of air was vented overboard...If you're in Oshkosh, Wis., on Tuesday, July 26...catch....GlobalFlyer, SpaceShipOne, and White Knight all together...if you can't wait...The Virtual Virgin GlobalFlyer (http://www.theheavenlyhangar.com/READMORE/GLOBFLYER/index.htm)..."
http://www.avweb.com/eletter/archives/avflash/374-full.html#189407

sarongsong
2005-Jul-29, 06:19 PM
July 29 (http://www.avweb.com/eletter/archives/avflash/444-full.html#190274)
"...[Fossett] announced a new plan to take the aircraft around the world again, and then keep going...The fuel vents were in the wrong place, and now they have been moved...engineers have told him the aircraft is capable of nonstop flight of up to 29,000 miles..."

publiusr
2005-Aug-03, 08:31 PM
He's trying to break the Voyager record. Branson and company need to give up these flights and focus money on SS2.