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Strange
2013-Nov-10, 12:47 PM
Not a very serious question, but ...

There was a comedy quiz program on the radio today. Someone said that when astronauts first get back to Earth they tend to drop a lot of things because they just let go of them and expect them to stay where they are.

It seems unlikely although not implausible.

Anyone heard of this happening or is it just a good joke?

caveman1917
2013-Nov-10, 02:14 PM
I hope they don't do that when upon coming back one of their kids jumped on them for a hug.

Glom
2013-Nov-10, 06:27 PM
I've heard that too. I'm sure I saw an interview with an ISS astronaut talking about dropping his toothpaste tube.

I have no citation though.

Strange
2013-Nov-10, 06:35 PM
I've heard that too. I'm sure I saw an interview with an ISS astronaut talking about dropping his toothpaste tube.

Yes, I can imagine it would be things like that where you are almost on "autopilot" (and hopefully not when playing with the kids!)

Tuckerfan
2013-Nov-11, 04:01 AM
I heard an interview with Charles Simonyi, who is the only two time space tourist and he said that he did, indeed, tend to drop things when he got back to Earth, because he was so used to just parking them in mid-air while in the ISS.

Noclevername
2013-Nov-11, 06:27 AM
Does anyone know how quickly it takes the astronauts to adapt from zero-g to full gravity and vice-versa?

NoChoice
2013-Nov-11, 06:31 AM
Yes, it takes on average 237.63 hours.

Strange
2013-Nov-11, 09:07 AM
Does anyone know how quickly it takes the astronauts to adapt from zero-g to full gravity and vice-versa?

I heard some of Chris Hadfield's book on the radio the other day. I *think* he said it took about 6 months to get full muscle and bone strength back. Not letting go of things in mid-air, probably a bit less.

Elukka
2013-Nov-11, 10:35 AM
This interview doesn't address the specific issue, but seems to indicate you adapt to freefall pretty well: http://www.projectrho.com/public_html/rocket/lifesupport.php#id--Human_Factors

neilzero
2013-Nov-16, 11:32 AM
I heard some of Chris Hadfield's book on the radio the other day. I *think* he said it took about 6 months to get full muscle and bone strength back. Not letting go of things in mid-air, probably a bit less.
I still occasionally hit the shift key to type a number, and it has been at least thirty years since I used a typewriter where that was the proper procedure = some old habits die hard. Neil

spjung
2013-Nov-19, 02:38 AM
Some astronauts have more problems adapting than others: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVxaL8CAO4M

Noclevername
2013-Nov-19, 02:44 AM
Does the length of the stay in free-fall correlate to how long it takes to re-adjust, or is there a certain threshold after which you go into "flying mode" or "grounded mode"?