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SkepticJ
2004-Dec-06, 03:00 PM
In the movie Apollo 13 Fred Haise says this "Ah, now that's a beautiful sight, the constellation Urine" Did he really say that? I think it's so funny, but only want to use it as a sig. somewhere if it's real.

kucharek
2004-Dec-06, 03:08 PM
I think, it's Urinon or Urinion. Don't know if Haise really did that remark, but there a some comments on urine dumps from other astronauts.

I read somewhere an astronaut was asked what was the most beautiful thing he remembers from his flight and he answerde: "Urine dump at sunrise.". Don't know if this is real or from a fictious story.

Harald

ToSeek
2004-Dec-06, 03:32 PM
Our first order of business on waking up (naturally) was to play Pass the Urine Bag (technically the UCD, or Urine Collection Device). After it was filled, a series of valves permitted us to dump the contents of the bag overboard.

Now, that was something worth taking a picture of. If one dumped just at sunset, the flecks of ice coming off the urine dump nozzle would look like a million stars and it would be impossible to take star sightings for about five minutes.

Of course, it's a real experience to see your own urine take on a cosmic quality in space. But it is eye-catching and every crew has taken pictures of it. The ice particles are quite beautiful, the very phenomenon that caused John Glenn to rave about the "fireflies" at sunset.

- Walter Cunningham (http://www.waltercunningham.com/the_all_american_boys-chap8.htm), Apollo 7 astronaut

ToSeek
2004-Dec-06, 03:37 PM
Well, actually, in Skylab we did something similar to that. But on Apollo the urine then would go outside, and you'd have to heat the nozzle because, of course, it instantly flashes into ice crystals. And, in fact, I told Stewart this, the most beautiful sight in orbit, or one of the most beautiful sights, is a urine dump at sunset, because as the stuff comes out and as it hits the exit nozzle it instantly flashes into ten million little ice crystals which go out almost in a hemisphere, because, you know, you're exiting into essentially a perfect vacuum, and so the stuff goes in every direction, and all radially out from the spacecraft at relatively high velocity. It's surprising, and it's an incredible stream of . . . just a spray of sparklers almost. It's really a spectacular sight. At any rate that's the urine system on Apollo.

- Rusty Schweikart (http://www.belmont.k12.ca.us/ralston/programs/itech/SpaceSettlement/CoEvolutionBook/SPACE.HTML#There%20Ain't%20No%20Graceful%20Way), Apollo 9 astronaut

Glom
2004-Dec-06, 04:05 PM
Those LMPs are so base. :D

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2004-Dec-06, 04:10 PM
That's right up there with, "There's nothing like the smell of Napalm in the morning!"

"There's nothing like the sight of a Urine Dump, at sunset."

Jason Thompson
2004-Dec-06, 04:23 PM
I may be wrong, but I believe it was Jim Lovell who coined the terms. During the press conference following Gemini 7 they showed part of the film from that flight which shows lots of sparkly things floating around in space. It was Jim Lovell who explained that this was 'urine dump at sunrise,' and it was either he or Frank Bormann who referred to it as the constellation Urion. (Thanks to the Spacecraft Films Gemini set for that piece of audio and film.)

amstrad
2004-Dec-06, 05:27 PM
I was never too good at thermodynamics, but:

How does the urine flash freeze in space? I can understand that it would freeze once the heat is radiated away (after a long time), but there is nothing to conductively remove the heat. Does it freeze because the nozzle is below freezing? How long would room temp water take to freeze through radiation?

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Dec-06, 05:35 PM
How does the urine flash freeze in space? I can understand that it would freeze once the heat is radiated away (after a long time), but there is nothing to conductively remove the heat.
Water has different freezing temperatures at different pressures. Phase diagrams (http://www.science.uwaterloo.ca/~cchieh/cact/c123/phasesdgm.html)--they say that water (I know, we're talking about urine) does not exist as a liquid below 4 or 5 mm Hg.

kucharek
2004-Dec-06, 05:55 PM
I was never too good at thermodynamics, but:

How does the urine flash freeze in space? I can understand that it would freeze once the heat is radiated away (after a long time), but there is nothing to conductively remove the heat. Does it freeze because the nozzle is below freezing? How long would room temp water take to freeze through radiation?
Part of the water vaporizes. It takes energy to turn water of a temperature into steam of the same temperature. This takes away heat energy from the rest of the water which freezes. Below some 5mm HG, water sublimates, existing either as solid ice or vapour.

That'sd the way how non-regenerative cooling units like of spacesuits work. Let some water freeze and sublimate. Vaprizing needs a lot of energy, even when it happens at such a low temperature.

Harald

Maksutov
2004-Dec-06, 06:27 PM
At least we now know, in regard to the sightings during Apollo and Skylab, what the "U" in "UFO" stands for. Ditto re the "F".

JohnD
2004-Dec-06, 07:19 PM
You don't have to be in orbit to see this. In the polar winter, if you choose a still day(!), go outside with a pan of hot water (it'll freeze too quickly otherwise) and throw the water in the air, it comes down as a miniature snow storm. There is a critical low temperature for this to happen - can't remember what it is. My evidence is a photo seen some time ago.
I suppose it would work with urine, but yellow snow?????
John

amstrad
2004-Dec-07, 02:03 AM
You don't have to be in orbit to see this. In the polar winter, if you choose a still day(!), go outside with a pan of hot water (it'll freeze too quickly otherwise) and throw the water in the air, it comes down as a miniature snow storm. There is a critical low temperature for this to happen - can't remember what it is. My evidence is a photo seen some time ago.
I suppose it would work with urine, but yellow snow?????
John

Its hard to do that sort of experiment here in Florida. ;) Hurricanes, we've got, but polar conditions....

And, don't eat the yellow snow.

ngc3314
2004-Dec-07, 03:45 AM
You don't have to be in orbit to see this. In the polar winter, if you choose a still day(!), go outside with a pan of hot water (it'll freeze too quickly otherwise) and throw the water in the air, it comes down as a miniature snow storm. There is a critical low temperature for this to happen - can't remember what it is. My evidence is a photo seen some time ago.
I suppose it would work with urine, but yellow snow?????
John

I have read (thankfully, my sojourns in the fUSSR were not in the relevant places to perform the experiment) that in Siberian winter, the male of the species can, if sufficiently inured to the elements, easily replicate these conditions and hear a sound known as the Song of the Stars...

iFire
2004-Dec-07, 03:52 PM
You don't have to be in orbit to see this. In the polar winter, if you choose a still day(!), go outside with a pan of hot water (it'll freeze too quickly otherwise) and throw the water in the air, it comes down as a miniature snow storm. There is a critical low temperature for this to happen - can't remember what it is. My evidence is a photo seen some time ago.
I suppose it would work with urine, but yellow snow?????
John

I think it would be best to collect the urine inside. I don't think exposure to the polar winter would be best. #-o

JohnD
2004-Dec-07, 10:44 PM
Don't try this at home, Sashinka!

jaydeehess
2004-Dec-07, 11:30 PM
This is partially the principle at work in snow making equipment that is used at many ski hills. High pressure air is injected to blow water into the air or the water itself is under very high pressure. It either vaporizes or is at least in very small droplets as the pressure drops at the nozzle exit and if the air temp is low enough you make instant snow. Well ice crystals anyways, real snow always is better to ski on. :D