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RickyPaul
2013-Dec-06, 05:47 AM
Everyone wants fitness so i am going to share some simple tips so that people can get fitness quickly.
1. Eat well and balanced diet food
2. Drink maximum water
3. Do walk daily and do some cardio exercises
4. Eat fruits and vegetables
5. Avoid fast food
For more tips visit this link LINK REMOVED

Noclevername
2013-Dec-06, 09:28 AM
5. Avoid fast food

Fast food is hard to catch, and tires me out. It's all the slow food that makes me fat. It just sits there!

rigel
2013-Dec-06, 09:18 PM
Good advice. I walk a little faster to keep the fast food from catching me.

Chuck
2013-Dec-07, 08:27 PM
Always remember:

Train, don't strain.

and

No pain, no gain.

Buttercup
2013-Dec-07, 08:30 PM
What a drag. :(

*lights another cigarette*

/joking (I don't smoke)

Not giving up sweets, EVER. :)

Noclevername
2013-Dec-07, 10:24 PM
Always remember:

Train, don't strain.

and

No pain, no gain.

I take a train so I don't strain.

Also, "Exercise never hurts me, I can watch it all day."

JohnD
2013-Dec-08, 11:14 PM
Good advice, excpet fopr the water.
"Maximum water"? You can drink yourself to death with water, you know!
Your kidneys have enormous capability to balance out your water intake. Drink more than you need and you just pee it out.
Drink when thirsty. But then, water is good!
JOn

starcanuck64
2013-Dec-08, 11:15 PM
I got very fit in a training program that involved moving 1,200 bales of hay from the fields to the barn in three days with three other people on my cousins central Idaho farm about 20 years ago. For aerobic health it's hard to beat haying during a July heatwave.

All you need is:

- A cousin with a farm.
- Enough pre-existing fitness that you don't die from heat stroke.
- Really hot weather in July.

pzkpfw
2013-Dec-08, 11:30 PM
Good advice, excpet fopr the water.
"Maximum water"? You can drink yourself to death with water, you know!
Your kidneys have enormous capability to balance out your water intake. Drink more than you need and you just pee it out.
Drink when thirsty. But then, water is good!
JOn

I've also read lately (can't provide reference right now) that some of the oft-quoted recommendations for amount of water to drink per day are a bit of a myth. Something to do with the study that led to it all being based on soldiers walking through a desert or something. e.g. Not directly applicable to office workers in a climate controlled building.

starcanuck64
2013-Dec-08, 11:35 PM
I've also read lately (can't provide reference right now) that some of the oft-quoted recommendations for amount of water to drink per day are a bit of a myth. Something to do with the study that led to it all being based on soldiers walking through a desert or something. e.g. Not directly applicable to office workers in a climate controlled building.

The Israelis found that if a soldier drank a litre of water an hour they probably wouldn't develop heat stroke even performing strenuously in very hot temperatures.

I've been in a hospital setting where some patients constantly tried to get drunk from water, it's not a very safe thing to do. Throwing off your electrolytic balance can be fatal.

Swift
2013-Dec-09, 02:13 AM
RickyPaul has been banned as a spammer, but feel free to discuss fitness

Noclevername
2013-Dec-09, 05:00 AM
RickyPaul? That's what I've been doing wrong, I got my fitness advice from someone called ChuckyCheese!


(Yes, I'm aware of the misspelling, but the joke works better this way. Just go with it.)

DonM435
2013-Dec-09, 04:59 PM
Is drinking diet soda all day any different from drinking the same volume of water?

JohnD
2013-Dec-09, 05:32 PM
Working hard, marching in desert heat, you will need lots of water.
And if you exercise hard in hot weather, like starcanuck, ditto, but except in the most extreme conditions the best guide is your own thirst.
Oh, and salt tablets are not needed in that situation! Plenty of salt in ordinary food - too much some say!

Diet soda? There have been suggestions that children who drink a lot of pop, especially sugary ones, get so many calories that way that not only are they prone to obesity, they will not eat proper foods and may be depleted in vitamins, proteins etc. that are in a normal diet. "Diet" soda won't give you the sugar, but are you eating a good diet of food as well?

John

Noclevername
2013-Dec-09, 05:36 PM
Is drinking diet soda all day any different from drinking the same volume of water?

Depends what's in the soda. Even without (or with less) sugar, the soda can contain all kinds of funky ingredients, most of them not given a lot of long-term testing beforehand.

NEOWatcher
2013-Dec-09, 08:15 PM
Depends what's in the soda. Even without (or with less) sugar, the soda can contain all kinds of funky ingredients, most of them not given a lot of long-term testing beforehand.
Even diet anything (at least from artifical sweeteners) can fool the body with sugar intake. So, even though the diet soda may not have a direct affect, it may cause you to intake the wrong balance of something else.

wd40
2013-Dec-09, 09:12 PM
Anyone have any experience of the "shape up" style of shoes which are made deliberately slightly unstable in order to keep the legs & back constantly "working out", thereby strengthening them and burn off calories, or so it is claimed?

JohnD
2013-Dec-09, 10:30 PM
NCM, care to be more specific about "funky ingredients"?
and
NW, how will a non-sugar diet soda make you consume "the wrong balance of something else"? And what?
and
wd40, PubMed is your friend:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23357759 They changed the working of ankle acting muscles, not increased them overall
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23830570 Ditto. Postural control system worked harder, but don't burn calories
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23871319 You are more likely to fallover wearing them. Dept.of No Great Surprises
Keep going:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22482849 WoooHooo!
"CONCLUSION: In obese patients, it is possible to increase energy expenditure of standing and walking by means of ergonomic unstable footwear. Long-term use of unstable shoes may eventually prevent a positive energy balance."!!! How much?
Standing: 0.15W/kg +/-0.2 (P=.0098)
Walking: 0.19J/kg/m +/-0.4 (P=0.035) (Which is insignificant) I think the emphasis is on "eventually" and "in obese patients"!

JOhn
PS, this is a science based website. A bit more rigour and precision of words and numbers in replies would be good.

starcanuck64
2013-Dec-09, 11:23 PM
Working hard, marching in desert heat, you will need lots of water.
And if you exercise hard in hot weather, like starcanuck, ditto, but except in the most extreme conditions the best guide is your own thirst.
Oh, and salt tablets are not needed in that situation! Plenty of salt in ordinary food - too much some say!

Diet soda? There have been suggestions that children who drink a lot of pop, especially sugary ones, get so many calories that way that not only are they prone to obesity, they will not eat proper foods and may be depleted in vitamins, proteins etc. that are in a normal diet. "Diet" soda won't give you the sugar, but are you eating a good diet of food as well?

John

Another extreme workout I had as a young man was my first day working on the green chain at a sawmill during the summer to make money for college in the fall. It involved taking the all the green(still wet) lumber that had just been cut in the sawmill and stacking it in piles to be dried in the massive kiln that was right next door. Very hot and and difficult work...and I'd brought coke as a drink for lunch and to replenish lost fluid. The first drink I took just about killed me, soda when you're truly thirsty might not be the best choice, water is the best I find and the mill also provided salt tablets to keep your electrolytes in balance.

Noclevername
2013-Dec-09, 11:37 PM
NCM, care to be more specific about "funky ingredients"?


It varies by brand. Read the ingredients labels.

pzkpfw
2013-Dec-09, 11:43 PM
PS, this is a science based website. A bit more rigour and precision of words and numbers in replies would be good.



I agree, no need for the "Off topic babbling" section to be unsciency.



Perhaps you can help clarify a few thing?



Working hard, marching in desert heat,

How far, and carrying what load? Is this for average people or only applied to people of soldier-level fitness?


you will need lots of water.


Please quantify "lots".


And if you exercise hard in hot weather, like starcanuck, ditto, but except in the most extreme conditions the best guide is your own thirst.


Please provide references to the other guides.


Oh, and salt tablets are not needed in that situation! Plenty of salt in ordinary food

References please.


- too much some say!


Who said?



Diet soda? There have been suggestions that children who drink a lot of pop, especially sugary ones, get so many calories that way that not only are they prone to obesity,

Suggestions by whom? Were these individuals or organisations?


they will not eat proper foods and may be depleted in vitamins, proteins etc. that are in a normal diet. "Diet" soda won't give you the sugar, but are you eating a good diet of food as well?

John

What is the "good diet" this is being compared to?


Thanks,

Trebuchet
2013-Dec-10, 01:29 AM
Anyone have any experience of the "shape up" style of shoes which are made deliberately slightly unstable in order to keep the legs & back constantly "working out", thereby strengthening them and burn off calories, or so it is claimed?

I've not tried them, but Skechers got in serious problems for false advertising with just such a product. Linky (http://money.cnn.com/2013/07/16/news/companies/skechers-shape-ups/).

jokergirl
2013-Dec-10, 11:10 AM
Anyone have any experience of the "shape up" style of shoes which are made deliberately slightly unstable in order to keep the legs & back constantly "working out", thereby strengthening them and burn off calories, or so it is claimed?

I've tried and used MBT; they have a rounded sole supposed to keep you off balance and work you out more. I was warned that I would get training pains the first few times I wore them, but I felt no effect from them - something I blame on training aikido regularly, being slightly unstable doesn't really bother me.
That being said, the shoes are pretty useless if you regularly climb stairs, walk on slippery, soft or otherwise unstable ground - basically do anything other than live in the city. (I had to change my motion patterns because of the slightly higher sole to avoid scuffing the top of the shoes on every step I climbed, and don't even think of scaling rocks or trekking in mud with them. You have no control at all in the tip of your feet.)

I suppose if you're a complete couch potato they do something. If not - you're better off with regular sneakers.

;)

PS: When the rubber foam in the soles gets old, they go from being unstable to being super painful for the feet. Not sure how ergonomic that is.

Solfe
2013-Dec-10, 12:58 PM
The best thing I do is keep a gallon jug of water in the fridge at all times. I am more likely to drink water if it is available at the perfect temperature. I completely stopped drinking soda by doing this. I also downsized my coffee cup to about 5 oz., mostly because this little cup stays at the right temperature all the way to the bottom. My problem is obviously the stuff going into my mouth faster than I can work it off.

As far as shoes go, I swear by Vans for walking and Chuck Taylors for hiking.

JohnD
2013-Dec-10, 05:58 PM
pkxpfy,
Ouch! Hoist by my own petard!
But a tad unfair, as I provided four refernces in support or denial of others claims.

But glad to walk the walk:
Fluid and electrolyte supplementation for exercise heat stress. Sawka MN, Montain SJ. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Aug;72(2 Suppl):564S-72S.
These guys are from the Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine Think they know of what they speak?
"For persons consuming a normal diet, electrolyte supplementation is not warranted except perhaps during the first few days of heat exposure."
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10919961

And children and sugary drinks:

Food sources of energy and nutrients among children in the United States: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 20032006. Keast DR, Fulgoni VL 3rd, Nicklas TA, O'Neil CE. Nutrients. 2013 Jan 22;5(1):283-301.
"Results suggest that many foods/food groupings consumed by children were energy dense, nutrient poor."
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23340318

"Funky" enough?
John

profloater
2013-Dec-10, 06:10 PM
the best training may be to do exactly want you want to be fit for, the body has multiple feedback loops to improve based on what you actually do, so walking for walking, lifting for lifting and so on. Sad thing is when you stop your fitness drains away by the same mechanisms. Bed rest for the elderly can be a real killer, muscles waste, bones decalcify, even in the first 24 hours! We need beds that shake you up from time to time!

pzkpfw
2013-Dec-10, 06:30 PM
"Funky" enough?
John

Yep.

And the bit I really wanted to comment on in that post was:

(From Report) "In obese patients, it is possible to increase energy expenditure of standing and walking by means of ergonomic unstable footwear."

I thought that was funny. If the obese patients were walking a bit more in the first place (even in "normal" shoes), they might not be obese. Or in other words, the unstable footwear still seems to be pointless.

They were a fad here, too, a couple of years ago. Seem to have faded away.


On a personal note: yesterday I ordered a treadmill on line. Be here in 5 to 7 days. It's for my Wife primarily, as she's been seriously putting effort into fitness. I want to try to follow suit. Treadmill at home seems way easier than getting to a gym before or after work; and I don't want to run in public until my fitness level rises above "hey, laugh at me".

pantaz
2013-Dec-11, 01:01 AM
Salt tablets are not recommended by any of the medical sources I've checked:

For exercise-related dehydration, cool water is your best bet. Sports drinks containing electrolytes and a carbohydrate solution also may be helpful. There's no need for salt tablets too much salt can lead to hypernatremic dehydration, a condition in which your body not only is short of water but also carries an excess of sodium.
-- http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dehydration/DS00561/DSECTION=treatments-and-drugs

Do not take salt tablets. Most people get plenty of salt in their diets. Use a sports drink if you are worried about replacing minerals lost through sweating.
-- http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/tc/dehydration-prevention

(First Aid)
... If alert, give the person beverages to sip (such as Gatorade), or make a salted drink by adding a teaspoon of salt per quart of water. Give a half cup every 15 minutes. Cool water will do if salt beverages are not available. ...
. . .
Do NOT give the person salt tablets.
-- http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000056.htm

HenrikOlsen
2013-Dec-12, 01:42 PM
Yep.

And the bit I really wanted to comment on in that post was:

(From Report) "In obese patients, it is possible to increase energy expenditure of standing and walking by means of ergonomic unstable footwear."

I thought that was funny. If the obese patients were walking a bit more in the first place (even in "normal" shoes), they might not be obese. Or in other words, the unstable footwear still seems to be pointless.

They were a fad here, too, a couple of years ago. Seem to have faded away.


On a personal note: yesterday I ordered a treadmill on line. Be here in 5 to 7 days. It's for my Wife primarily, as she's been seriously putting effort into fitness. I want to try to follow suit. Treadmill at home seems way easier than getting to a gym before or after work; and I don't want to run in public until my fitness level rises above "hey, laugh at me".
<joke>Studies show that obese people who regularly tie their hair with a red ribbon and then use a treadmill for half an hour will lose weight.</joke>