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gzhpcu
2013-Dec-12, 06:09 AM
I have always been interested in Roman History, especially the first twelve Caesers covered by Suetonious. I have enjoyed reading Ben Kane, Simon Scarrow, Lindsey Davis, Steven Saylor, John Maddox Roberts, Robert Graves. Anybody else out there also like reading such historical novels? Any authors you particularly enjoyed which I have missed?

chrissy
2013-Dec-15, 05:56 PM
I am also into historical books, be it fiction or factual. I have read a few books on the crusades: Brethren (trilogy) by Robyn Young, they are tough to read at the beginning but the fun starts soon afterwards, also Raymond Khoury has quite a collection of historical books which are also a good read. Steve Berry writes about the Knights Templar I enjoyed reading his books.

Noclevername
2013-Dec-15, 08:20 PM
Sword At Sunset by Rosemary Sutcliffe is basically an interpretation of the early King Arthur legends set in a barely post-Roman Britain with Artos/Artorius as a Romanized Briton fighting off Anglo-Saxon invaders. Instead of castles and knights in shining armor, it has hill-forts and tribesmen in rusty chainmail (and they have to steal that from the Saxons). Excellent historic detail, including the hardships of breeding half-wild horses and the near-starvation of winter in a temperate agricultural society.

Paul Beardsley
2013-Dec-15, 08:42 PM
Actually I think Rosemary Sutcliffe is pretty well unbeatable. I've read a handful of hers, including the exquisite Song for a Dark Queen (about Boudicca) and the well-known Eagle of the Ninth. I think she was one of the first of the current wave of children's authors who Will Not talk down to their audience.

JohnD
2013-Dec-15, 10:13 PM
Ancient Greece, not Rome, but the novels of Mary Renault?
There's a list on her Wiki page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Renault
John

gzhpcu
2013-Dec-17, 08:16 AM
Sword At Sunset by Rosemary Sutcliffe is basically an interpretation of the early King Arthur legends set in a barely post-Roman Britain with Artos/Artorius as a Romanized Briton fighting off Anglo-Saxon invaders. Instead of castles and knights in shining armor, it has hill-forts and tribesmen in rusty chainmail (and they have to steal that from the Saxons). Excellent historic detail, including the hardships of breeding half-wild horses and the near-starvation of winter in a temperate agricultural society.

Is it similar to Bernard Cornwell's Arthurian novels, in case you know them?

gzhpcu
2013-Dec-17, 08:16 AM
Ancient Greece, not Rome, but the novels of Mary Renault?
There's a list on her Wiki page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Renault
John
Yes, I know her, but am more fascinated by the Roman imperial period.

gzhpcu
2013-Dec-17, 08:19 AM
I am also into historical books, be it fiction or factual. I have read a few books on the crusades: Brethren (trilogy) by Robyn Young, they are tough to read at the beginning but the fun starts soon afterwards, also Raymond Khoury has quite a collection of historical books which are also a good read. Steve Berry writes about the Knights Templar I enjoyed reading his books.

I have read Sir Walter Scott's novels like Ivanhoe, The Talisman, etc. Enjoyed them.

Ivan Viehoff
2013-Dec-17, 03:24 PM
I have always been interested in Roman History, especially the first twelve Caesers covered by Suetonious. I have enjoyed reading Ben Kane, Simon Scarrow, Lindsey Davis, Steven Saylor, John Maddox Roberts, Robert Graves. Anybody else out there also like reading such historical novels? Any authors you particularly enjoyed which I have missed?
Shakespeare wrote a few, though plays rather than novels: Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, Titus Andronicus, Coriolanus. While on plays, there is Howard Brenton's The Romans in Britain, which was pretty controversial when it had its first run at the National Theatre. I don't know if it has ever been put on again.

A previous poster mentions Walter Scott, and I was thinking "why doesn't he mention Ben-Hur?" which at least seems to be set in the right era unlike any, er, other of Scott's books. I have just discovered taht Scott didn't write Ben-Hur. I have been labouring under a misconception since I was a child, and was given a 2-pack of books containing (the original unabridged texts of) Ivanhoe and Ben-Hur (in rather small print), neither of which even as a studious 8-yr-old I was going to find remotely digestible, so they were left unread. And now I have looked at a description of Lew Wallace's book, whose full title is Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ, a title not present in its completeness on the edition I was given. I suspect the relatives who gave it to me had no conception at all of what they were giving me, they probably thought it would all be chariot races and Charlton Heston. Which is probably the other reason no one mentioned it. I did get around to reading Ivanhoe later in life. It wasn't quite what I expected.