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View Full Version : 9,000 years of getting drunk



ToSeek
2004-Dec-07, 05:52 PM
It all started in China. (http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99996759)


Chemical tests on ancient fragments of broken pottery show that Chinese villagers were brewing alcoholic drinks as far back as 7000 BC. That beats the previous record for the oldest evidence of brewing, found in Iran and dated at about 5400 BC.

Candy
2004-Dec-07, 06:08 PM
Wow, they must have awesome beer. That's a lot of years to reach perfection. I don't think I've ever had a Chinese beer. :P

Swift
2004-Dec-07, 07:07 PM
Chinese beer (http://www.tsingtaobeer.com/brand/brand.htm)
Pretty good, though not my favorite.

The Tsingtao Brewery was founded in 1903 by German settlers in Qingdao, China.
I guess they can't trace their own brewery back to 7000 BC.

ToSeek
2004-Dec-07, 07:41 PM
Wow, they must have awesome beer. That's a lot of years to reach perfection. I don't think I've ever had a Chinese beer. :P

I have a friend who once claimed she only drank Chinese beer. My wife still wonders how often she actually drinks beer.

Candy
2004-Dec-07, 08:42 PM
Chinese beer (http://www.tsingtaobeer.com/brand/brand.htm)
Pretty good, though not my favorite.

The Tsingtao Brewery was founded in 1903 by German settlers in Qingdao, China.
I guess they can't trace their own brewery back to 7000 BC.


Original Gravity:
11.0 degrees Plato
From your link, what does this mean? 8-[

Swift
2004-Dec-07, 08:53 PM
Chinese beer (http://www.tsingtaobeer.com/brand/brand.htm)
Pretty good, though not my favorite.

The Tsingtao Brewery was founded in 1903 by German settlers in Qingdao, China.
I guess they can't trace their own brewery back to 7000 BC.


Original Gravity:
11.0 degrees Plato
From your link, what does this mean? 8-[
Gravity, as in specific gravity, the relative density of a liquid, usually measured relative to water. Apparently brewers use units called Platos.
LINKY DINKY (http://beercolor.netfirms.com/saccharometer.html)

frogesque
2004-Dec-07, 09:01 PM
OG is used to determine the sugar content before fermentation. IIRC about half the sugar converts to alchohol and half to CO2 so you would end up with about 5.5% alchohol by vol. I have a beer hygrometer around somewhere and I'll check (if I can find it).

Edit: Aha! I was almost right but for the wrong reason! 11.0deg Plato represents 110 grams sugar / litre, this solution will have an approximate specific gravity (or original gravity OG) of 1.043 and will, if fully fermented produce an alcohol content of 5.5% by volume. About your average premium high strength beer.

George
2004-Dec-08, 12:00 AM
Chinese beer (http://www.tsingtaobeer.com/brand/brand.htm)
Pretty good, though not my favorite.
Maybe it takes a few thousand years to acquire a taste for it.



The Tsingtao Brewery was founded in 1903 by German settlers in Qingdao, China.
I guess they can't trace their own brewery back to 7000 BC.
Ok, maybe the Chinese never did acquire a taste for it. :)

enginelessjohn
2004-Dec-08, 08:58 AM
Chinese beer (http://www.tsingtaobeer.com/brand/brand.htm)
Pretty good, though not my favorite.

The Tsingtao Brewery was founded in 1903 by German settlers in Qingdao, China.
I guess they can't trace their own brewery back to 7000 BC.

Well, having got a bit drunk on the stuff in Beijing, I feel immensly qualified to comment on this....

Tsingsao, is okay as far as lager goes, and it seems to be the only stuff that gets exported to the west. The other brand of lager I noticed was Snow, which to all intents and purposes seems the same, although I can't tell one brand of lager from another. Whereas the food was spectacularly good....

More ancient booze links....

http://www.museum.upenn.edu/new/exhibits/online_exhibits/wine/wineneolithic.html

Cheers
John

Candy
2004-Dec-08, 01:26 PM
Tsingsao, is okay as far as lager goes, and it seems to be the only stuff that gets exported to the west.
I looked for Tsingsao, and I couldn't find it. :(

I, however, found Sapporo. I bought some Guinness, too. I wonder if Polish beer is any good. :P

frogesque
2004-Dec-08, 01:34 PM
Candy wrote:


I, however, found Sapporo. I bought some Guinness, too. I wonder if Polish beer is any good.


There ya go, new smiley for you!

http://frogesque.com/gif/drink.gif

Candy
2004-Dec-08, 01:39 PM
Candy wrote:


I, however, found Sapporo. I bought some Guinness, too. I wonder if Polish beer is any good.


There ya go, new smiley for you!

http://frogesque.com/gif/drink.gif I need a pizza one, too. :lol:

Joe The Dude
2004-Dec-08, 01:58 PM
I couldn't find the animated smiley-eating-pizza one, but I did find this:

http://pages.sbcglobal.net/joethedude/pizza.gif

Candy
2004-Dec-08, 02:07 PM
I couldn't find the animated smiley-eating-pizza one, but I did find this:

http://pages.sbcglobal.net/joethedude/pizza.gif
He's so cute. Is his name Pi? 8-[

gethen
2004-Dec-08, 02:41 PM
Chinese beer (http://www.tsingtaobeer.com/brand/brand.htm)
Pretty good, though not my favorite.

The Tsingtao Brewery was founded in 1903 by German settlers in Qingdao, China.
I guess they can't trace their own brewery back to 7000 BC.

Well, having got a bit drunk on the stuff in Beijing, I feel immensly qualified to comment on this....

Tsingsao, is okay as far as lager goes, and it seems to be the only stuff that gets exported to the west. Cheers
John
Tsingtao is kind of hard to find around here, but I've tried it once or twice, and I'd call it O.K. Wonder if the Chinese make anything other than a lager.

enginelessjohn
2004-Dec-08, 04:00 PM
Tsingtao is kind of hard to find around here, but I've tried it once or twice, and I'd call it O.K. Wonder if the Chinese make anything other than a lager.

I belive that they make a kind of rice wine, although I've never had that. Seeing as I was there on a business trip I felt I had to behave a bit.... :D

Cheers
John

Long March
2004-Dec-08, 07:03 PM
It was the Germans who taught the Chinese to make beer. The word pijiu for beer is now in very general use in China, and you can buy beer anywhere in the country, but technically it's a loan word. Tsingtao (now usually written Qingdao) was a German concession in the 19 century, and that's where it all began...

Of course, there's other forms of alcohol in China. The most common is a stong spirit distilled from fermented grain - anything between 30% and 60% proof. Generally, these "wines" taste like very strong alcohol - I never drank enough to distinguish good from bad. Not subtle, but very effective. Especially if you drink 60% stuff thinking it's 30% (that was a night to remeber all right...)

There's also a more gentle stuff that tastes more like sherry, but that's not so universal. And some regions produce local specialities - a sickly sweet grape wine (think very heavily sweetened port), and I think something exists that's made of rose petals.

Candy
2004-Dec-08, 07:20 PM
That's some potent alcohol. Sounds like they have been worshipping the Porcelain goddess (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=17985) for a long time. :wink: Sorry, bad humor.