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Wally
2004-Dec-09, 12:33 PM
. . . when the PTB take a literal conversion of KM to MPH (or vise-versa) for an article. Case in point, from this (http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/12/06/solar.storms/index.html) article in CNN:


The ion tails of comets constantly stream away from the Sun, pushed back by solar wind blowing at about 894,774 mph (400 kilometers per second).

Wow! They nailed it down to within a single mile per hour! That's one heck of a speed gun they have!! :lol:

Bozola
2004-Dec-09, 01:05 PM
. . . when the PTB take a literal conversion of KM to MPH (or vise-versa) for an article. Case in point, from this (http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/12/06/solar.storms/index.html) article in CNN:


The ion tails of comets constantly stream away from the Sun, pushed back by solar wind blowing at about 894,774 mph (400 kilometers per second).

Wow! They nailed it down to within a single mile per hour! That's one heck of a speed gun they have!! :lol:

Heh. Two sig-figs used everywhere except for this converted value. Sad, but all too common misuse.

Normandy6644
2004-Dec-09, 03:17 PM
I like how they went from miles per hour to kilometers per second. :D

Ut
2004-Dec-09, 03:25 PM
multiply by 3600?

Normandy6644
2004-Dec-09, 03:30 PM
multiply by 3600?

Yeah, I'm not saying it's a problem, but I would think normally you would keep the same time unit just for consistency.

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Dec-09, 05:10 PM
. . . when the PTB take a literal conversion of KM to MPH (or vise-versa) for an article. Case in point, from this (http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/12/06/solar.storms/index.html) article in CNN:


The ion tails of comets constantly stream away from the Sun, pushed back by solar wind blowing at about 894,774 mph (400 kilometers per second).

Wow! They nailed it down to within a single mile per hour! That's one heck of a speed gun they have!! :lol:
Good one.

Plus, it should be 894,775 mph. :)

Bozola
2004-Dec-09, 06:08 PM
. . . when the PTB take a literal conversion of KM to MPH (or vise-versa) for an article. Case in point, from this (http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/12/06/solar.storms/index.html) article in CNN:


The ion tails of comets constantly stream away from the Sun, pushed back by solar wind blowing at about 894,774 mph (400 kilometers per second).

Wow! They nailed it down to within a single mile per hour! That's one heck of a speed gun they have!! :lol:
Good one.

Plus, it should be 894,775 mph. :)

Well...894,774.5 if you use the full precision provided with NIST's 1.609344 value.

Precise, but, of course, not accurate.

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Dec-09, 06:15 PM
Well...894,774.5 if you use the full precision provided with NIST's 1.609344 value.
No, that would take you to 894774.51682176091624910522548272 and beyond. :)

Bozola
2004-Dec-09, 06:48 PM
Well...894,774.5 if you use the full precision provided with NIST's 1.609344 value.
No, that would take you to 894774.51682176091624910522548272 and beyond. :)

Nope. The precision of the NIST value limits the precision of your final answer. Proper reporting of results does not arbitrarially create precision not found in the data.

In the original article, the minimum precision appears to be to two sigfigs, so that the best they could report would be 890,000mph.

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Dec-09, 06:55 PM
Nope. The precision of the NIST value limits the precision of your final answer. Proper reporting of results does not arbitrarially create precision not found in the data.

NIST's value is exact.


In the original article, the minimum precision appears to be to two sigfigs, so that the best they could report would be 890,000mph.
Exactly. You can't chose the one with the greatest precision. The limiting factor is the 400.

My original cwiticism was of the arithmetic, not the precision

01101001
2004-Dec-09, 07:49 PM
Maybe Google Calculator needs a calculator mode that understands significant digits.

Google: 400 km/sec in mph
Result: 400 (kilometers / second) = 894 774.517 mph

I wonder what CNN (or their wire service) uses for conversions.

Bozola
2004-Dec-09, 08:35 PM
NIST's value is exact.

Hrrr. I forgot that NIST uses the international definition of the inch, not the US survey.

I HATE the "standard" system of measurement. Useless piece of obsolete crap.



Exactly. You can't chose the one with the greatest precision. The limiting factor is the 400.

Heh. I gave them the benefit of the doubt; 400 can be 4.00, 4.0, or 4 * 10^2


My original cwiticism was of the arithmetic, not the precision

The downward spiral of clashing witticisms. Just playing with numbers, too.