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Garrison
2014-Jan-08, 10:24 PM
Article at the BBC website:

International Space Station life 'to be extended' (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-25660857)

The Whitehouse is backing an extension of the ISS until 2024 but I found the second half of the article more intriguing; the German space agency and ESA are taking an interest in the Dream Chaser. This could be very good news for Sierra Nevada as Dream Chaser seems to be firmly in third place as far as NASA funding goes. Dream Chaser even looks like the old ESA Hermes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermes_%28spacecraft%29):).

ravens_cry
2014-Jan-08, 10:33 PM
Article at the BBC website:

International Space Station life 'to be extended' (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-25660857)

The Whitehouse is backing an extension of the ISS until 2024 but I found the second half of the article more intriguing; the German space agency and ESA are taking an interest in the Dream Chaser. This could be very good news for Sierra Nevada as Dream Chaser seems to be firmly in third place as far as NASA funding goes. Dream Chaser even looks like the old ESA Hermes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermes_%28spacecraft%29):).
It also looks like the Soviet Spiral (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikoyan-Gurevich_MiG-105) space plane. This really shouldn't be too surprising. The laws of physics are the laws of physics, and engineers trying to solve similar problems often come up with similar solutions.

Garrison
2014-Jan-08, 11:07 PM
It also looks like the Soviet Spiral (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikoyan-Gurevich_MiG-105) space plane. This really shouldn't be too surprising. The laws of physics are the laws of physics, and engineers trying to solve similar problems often come up with similar solutions.

Indeed but since it fits in so well with the ESA's old plans that's probably a plus. I suspect the ESA has never really given up on the idea of having its own manned capability and the Germans are looking towards increasing the 'space sector' of their economy(and they're not the only ones of course) while Sierra Nevada has to be looking for partners beyond NASA as Dragonrider and the CST-100 look to be in the lead for their crew launch requirements.

As for the ISS; did anyone really think it would be decommissioned in 2020?

ravens_cry
2014-Jan-08, 11:46 PM
Perhaps. I'd like to see how a small, reusable winged Shuttle turns out, so I wish them the best success.

TheyDidGoToTheMoon
2014-Jan-09, 12:22 PM
Well at least LEO will continue for sometime. It would of been quite sad if we all lost that frontier, not much of one.

NEOWatcher
2014-Jan-09, 12:53 PM
It also looks like the Soviet Spiral (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikoyan-Gurevich_MiG-105) space plane. This really shouldn't be too surprising. The laws of physics are the laws of physics, and engineers trying to solve similar problems often come up with similar solutions.

Plus; they did start with the design of the HL-20 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HL-20_Personnel_Launch_System).

marsbug
2014-Jan-09, 01:09 PM
Well at least LEO will continue for sometime. It would of been quite sad if we all lost that frontier, not much of one.

I'd love to see LEO becoming more developed wrt manned stations over the next ten years. My fingers are crossed, but I'm not betting body parts on it...

Local Fluff
2014-Jan-09, 01:56 PM
What's a realistic technical lifetime of the ISS? Are malfunctions occuring more frequently already?

Nicolas
2014-Jan-09, 02:28 PM
Indeed but since it fits in so well with the ESA's old plans that's probably a plus. I suspect the ESA has never really given up on the idea of having its own manned capability and the Germans are looking towards increasing the 'space sector' of their economy(and they're not the only ones of course) while Sierra Nevada has to be looking for partners beyond NASA as Dragonrider and the CST-100 look to be in the lead for their crew launch requirements.

As for the ISS; did anyone really think it would be decommissioned in 2020?

2 thoughts on this:
-The way I heard it, one of the main reasons HERMES was dropped was because they couldn't get it stable on top of the Ariane 5. So likely other similar craft also won't be stable on top of Ariane 5. Ariane 5 is at the moment the only man rated ESA launcher. Unless you include Soyuz (also launched from ESA base). However, Wikipedia claims $$$ as reason to cancel HERMES. I think that the truth behind the stability story is that making Hermes/interface/Ariane 5 strong enough for the loads of a top mounted shuttle would have increased the required power of Ariane 5 even further, and that's where the $$$ comes in. But I can't find good references other than 1987 discussions and what my professors told me.
-if ESA wants a manned capability, I think the easiest way would be to make a manned version of the ATV? It's already a pressurized craft capable of docking with the ISS, launched from a man rated launcher. Of course, it's currently lacking the quite important non-destructive return capability. :) So that would be an easy way to get one-way capability, but still a long shot from return capability.

Squink
2014-Jan-09, 06:47 PM
Here's the skinny from NASA itself:
Obama Administration Extends International Space Station Until at Least 2024 (http://blogs.nasa.gov/bolden/2014/01/08/obama-administration-extends-international-space-station-until-at-least-2024/)

NEOWatcher
2014-Jan-09, 06:57 PM
Here's the skinny from NASA itself:
Obama Administration Extends International Space Station Until at Least 2024 (http://blogs.nasa.gov/bolden/2014/01/08/obama-administration-extends-international-space-station-until-at-least-2024/)

What they fail to mention is that it still needs to get funded by Congress, and continued by the next presidential administration.
But; it's still promising news.

publiusr
2014-Jan-10, 11:05 PM
I hate to see infrastructure thrown away. Now there is this big stink about test stands. It never stops.

Garrison
2014-Jan-11, 01:22 AM
I hate to see infrastructure thrown away. Now there is this big stink about test stands. It never stops.

Well firstly the point is they aren't 'throwing away' the ISS and secondly I have no clue what your talking about with regard to test stands.

selvaarchi
2014-Jan-11, 09:23 AM
I'd love to see LEO becoming more developed wrt manned stations over the next ten years. My fingers are crossed, but I'm not betting body parts on it...

In 2020 the Chinese will have their space station up and running so you should get your wish:rimshot:.

Noclevername
2014-Jan-11, 09:25 AM
In 2020 the Chinese will have their space station up and running so you should get your wish:rimshot:.

Bigelow may beat them to it.

marsbug
2014-Jan-11, 12:27 PM
I'd like to see a private commercial manned space station - the more the merrier as long as someone is getting something from them! I know it's a rowing boat miracle I'm asking for, so shoot me for b eing unambitious, but I strongly suspect that huge grand plans unveiled by governments in showers of glory will go the way of project constallation.

Garrison
2014-Jan-11, 02:32 PM
Bigelow may beat them to it.

What's holding them back is the lack of a crew vehicle but they are due to launch a module to the ISS.

Van Rijn
2014-Jan-25, 01:30 AM
According to this article, Sierra Nevada signed a deal to do an uncrewed flight of the Dream Chaser in 2016, and if that works out, a crewed flight in 2017:

http://www.nbcnews.com/science/sierra-nevada-strikes-deal-put-space-plane-orbit-2016-2D11988267

I am more and more convinced that the Shuttle hiatus is one of the best things that could have happened to us. We're likely soon to have at least two, and very possibly three, different commercial spacecraft to carry people to orbit. The Space Shuttle was an "all your eggs in one basket" situation, but now we'll have choices, and a problem with one won't ground them all. And they'll be less expensive as well.

TheyDidGoToTheMoon
2014-Jan-27, 07:39 PM
Wait until that has actually happened, before you jump ahead.

Garrison
2014-Jan-27, 09:19 PM
Wait until that has actually happened, before you jump ahead.

Well at this point it would require an epic series of disasters to stop at least one of Dragonrider/CST-100/Dream Chaser flying within the next couple of years.

Van Rijn
2014-Jan-29, 04:01 AM
And the Dragon capsule has already flown with cargo. The crewed version isn't that different. All of them would fly on existing rockets.

selvaarchi
2015-Oct-27, 01:23 PM
What's holding them back is the lack of a crew vehicle but they are due to launch a module to the ISS.

I see from the spaceflight calendar that BEAM is scheduled to be launched on January 3 2016 on a Falcon 9 v1.2. Fingers crossed all goes well.