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TravisM
2004-Dec-13, 12:37 PM
At this time it was 9 min an counting!!!! :D

frogesque
2004-Dec-13, 12:52 PM
Any word yet?

TravisM
2004-Dec-13, 12:54 PM
Data transmission expected soon. Happened 4:46 am pst.

frogesque
2004-Dec-13, 12:57 PM
Hehehe! So many goodies, so little time. :lol:

kucharek
2004-Dec-13, 01:03 PM
Data transmission expected soon. Happened 4:46 am pst.

We've to wait another 12 hours, transmission will begin 14. December 0:00 UTC

tlbs101
2004-Dec-13, 05:50 PM
I was reading the Flyby-B timeline (see page 5 of this link) (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/products/pdfs/tbFlyby20041206.pdf) on the NASA/JPL site, and I noticed that a Dione closest approach is not targeted, because of the Titan data playback. Although the approach is not that "close", ~72.5 km, compared to others in the future, I would think any opportunity should not be wasted.

badprof
2004-Dec-13, 06:00 PM
~72.5 km

Actually, I would call that a reasonably close flyby!!!! :o :wink: 8-[ :lol:

Maurice

ToSeek
2004-Dec-13, 06:40 PM
~72.5 km

Actually, I would call that a reasonably close flyby!!!! :o :wink: 8-[ :lol:

Maurice

Of course, that's actually 72.5 thousand kilometers.

Kullat Nunu
2004-Dec-13, 06:42 PM
I was reading the Flyby-B timeline (see page 5 of this link) (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/products/pdfs/tbFlyby20041206.pdf) on the NASA/JPL site, and I noticed that a Dione closest approach is not targeted, because of the Titan data playback. Although the approach is not that "close", ~72.5 km, compared to others in the future, I would think any opportunity should not be wasted.

I understood that "non-targeted" means that Cassini was not targeted to fly by Dione as it was with Titan. Besides the Dione flyby happens 2:52 AM Wednesday groud UTC time and Titan data playback stops 9:00 AM ground UTC Tuesday.

AlexBlackwell
2004-Dec-13, 08:01 PM
I was reading the Flyby-B timeline (see page 5 of this link) (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/products/pdfs/tbFlyby20041206.pdf) on the NASA/JPL site, and I noticed that a Dione closest approach is not targeted, because of the Titan data playback. Although the approach is not that "close", ~72.5 km, compared to others in the future, I would think any opportunity should not be wasted.
As someone else alluded to, a "non-targeted" encounter simply means that Cassini will not perform a propulsive maneuver to alter the flyby distance. In fact, Cassini will perform observations of Dione following Tb.

AlexBlackwell
2004-Dec-13, 09:23 PM
As someone else alluded to, a "non-targeted" encounter simply means that Cassini will not perform a propulsive maneuver to alter the flyby distance. In fact, Cassini will perform observations of Dione following Tb.
Here's (http://ciclops.lpl.arizona.edu/view.php?id=649) a good depiction of the Dione non-targeted flyby.

Kullat Nunu
2004-Dec-13, 09:56 PM
Planned image coverage - Titan (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06148)

http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/browse/PIA06148.jpg

Pretty much same area as in the Titan-A flyby.

Planned image coverage - Dione (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06150)

http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/browse/PIA06150.jpg

Highest-resolution imaging is targeted to the mysterious whispy area.

frogesque
2004-Dec-13, 10:07 PM
Anything planned for Helene?

um3k
2004-Dec-14, 12:03 AM
Is there going to be a live webcast like there was for Titan-a?

um3k
2004-Dec-14, 01:39 AM
Maybe I'm impatient, but where are the pictures?

lyford
2004-Dec-14, 01:44 AM
Maybe I'm impatient, but where are the pictures?
I feel your pain! :wink:

too many probes... must pace myself...

AlexBlackwell
2004-Dec-14, 01:50 AM
Maybe I'm impatient, but where are the pictures?
You are impatient, um3K. Data have been hitting the ground only for the last couple of hours. Note that the UVIS stellar occultation data of Titan's atmosphere have priority in this downlik since they are critical for the Huygens Probe mission. However, from what I've been told, the first imagery (low resolution wide-angle camera data) has been received. Stay tuned.

AlexBlackwell
2004-Dec-14, 01:53 AM
Is there going to be a live webcast like there was for Titan-a?
No, especially since the Tb flyby has already happened.

Matt McIrvin
2004-Dec-14, 01:55 AM
The Planetary Society (http://www.planetary.org/news/2004/cassini_titan00b_plan_1211.html) has an excellent rundown of the Titan and Dione encounters. (The Planetary Society site often has better-organized and more in-depth information about these missions than NASA provides. Their whole Saturn exploration section (http://planetary.org/saturn/index.html) is superb.)

You can see from the timeline there that playback of Titan-B encounter data has only just begun now, and won't be finished until the wee hours of the morning. And I think the data transmission is supposed to begin with the UVIS star occultation data, because that's considered critical for mission planning (for the information it gives about Titan's atmosphere). So don't expect pictures immediately.

Cassini is unlike, say, Voyager 1 and 2 in that it has no movable scan platform with the imaging instruments; the whole craft has to turn to point them. Also, it uses its big dish for radar mapping as well as for communication. All that means that it has to do most of its science while the dish is pointed away from Earth, so it stores the data in its internal memory and then points toward Earth to send it home. That typically adds a delay of hours after an encounter before it can call home, and then of course there's the 1-hour-plus light travel delay.

lyford
2004-Dec-14, 02:30 AM
Is there going to be a live webcast like there was for Titan-a?
No, especially since the Tb flyby has already happened.
No Gay Yee this time - got bumped by "This Is Your Life, Sean O'Keefe." "Titan FlyBy? Isn't that a rerun?"

Speaking as one who has stayed up late to see the downlinks live on NASATV, I thought that this flyby would be covered live as well. But there is a LOT going on right now, what with Deep Impact's launch, Sean retiring, MER successes, Shuttle return to flight and the Space Station going on a diet.

Speaking emotionally, some of us feel very personally attached to these probes and are anxious to have access to their data. Much of the public* are invested in these missions, especially when they take so long to reach their goals. (I remember Cassini when it was just a pup in a clean room!) It's a testament to the sucess of NASA's outreach that we just expect real time or near real time updates nowadays.

Howver, I do realize this is NASA, not ESPN, and expecting a live feed from the DSN to the website is a bit much.

They gotta cover the Huygens probe descent on NASA TV live, though, they just gotta....(Or would that be on ESA-TV?)


* I guess I should say SOME of the public, since my wife cannot fathom my preoocupation with the MER images - "What? Another rock?"

BTW, welcome to the BABB, AlexBlackwell - I appreciate your good deeds over at http://mer.rlproject.com/

AlexBlackwell
2004-Dec-14, 05:47 AM
BTW, welcome to the BABB, AlexBlackwell - I appreciate your good deeds over at http://mer.rlproject.com/
Thanks, lyford. That's always nice to hear ;-)

BTW, some early imagery from the Tb flyby is now being displayed on the JPL Cassini/Huygens website (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.cfm).

AlexBlackwell
2004-Dec-14, 05:58 AM
Cassini Successfully Completes Titan Flyby (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2004-288)
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
December 13, 2004

Maksutov
2004-Dec-14, 10:02 AM
Additional images may be viewed at CICLOPS here. (http://ciclops.lpl.arizona.edu/view_event.php?id=7) Thank you, Carolyn Porco and the rest of the imaging team!

Maksutov
2004-Dec-14, 10:05 AM
[edit]Speaking emotionally, some of us feel very personally attached to these probes and are anxious to have access to their data. Much of the public* are invested in these missions, especially when they take so long to reach their goals. (I remember Cassini when it was just a pup in a clean room!) It's a testament to the sucess of NASA's outreach that we just expect real time or near real time updates nowadays...
Heck, I remember Cassini's RTGs when they were just a preliminary design specification.

You're right about the personal attachment.

lyford
2004-Dec-14, 04:33 PM
BTW, some early imagery from the Tb flyby is now being displayed on the JPL Cassini/Huygens website (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.cfm).

And here I was hitting refresh every 30 seconds on the RAW image page.... just like the one arm bandits in Vegas... I think I have a problem :wink:

Shoulda been watching the press releases. Oh well, they are up on the Raw Image Archivve (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/index.cfm) now as well.

Guess I went to bed too early this time!

Thanks - Maksutov for the CICLOPS link. I can never tell who is going to get the pics first.

Worth the wait? SWEET FANCY MOSES!
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/casJPGBrowseS06/W00003516.jpg
Tthis is Titan's atmosphere - does anyone know if that eclipsy effect is natural, or does Cassini "block out" the moon in optics?

kucharek
2004-Dec-14, 04:38 PM
does anyone know if that eclipsy effect is natural, or does Cassini "block out" the moon in optics?
Cassini really went "behind" Titan. The ring is typical for an eclipse by a body with an atmosphere.

lyford
2004-Dec-14, 06:17 PM
does anyone know if that eclipsy effect is natural, or does Cassini "block out" the moon in optics?
Cassini really went "behind" Titan. The ring is typical for an eclipse by a body with an atmosphere.
Yes, I figured as much - that's a lot of smog!

kucharek
2004-Dec-15, 11:42 AM
Dione (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/casJPGFullS06/N00025770.jpg)
Dione (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/casJPGFullS06/N00025767.jpg)

Nice straight scratch on the second image. Woo-woo fodder.

lyford
2004-Dec-15, 09:29 PM
Bye Bye Dione! (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/raw-images-details.cfm?feiImageID=29118)
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/casJPGBrowseS06/W00003856.jpg

Hello Iapetus! (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/raw-images-details.cfm?feiImageID=29055)
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/casJPGBrowseS06/N00025971.jpg

Quite a bit of space out there!

Kullat Nunu
2004-Dec-15, 10:02 PM
Dione (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/raw-images-details.cfm?feiImageID=29076) in front of Saturn!

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/casJPGBrowseS06/W00003814.jpg

This one is quite alien-looking (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/raw-images-details.cfm?feiImageID=28866) (part of a Saturn mosaic)

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/casJPGBrowseS06/W00003688.jpg

Kullat Nunu
2004-Dec-15, 10:06 PM
Clearly it's the same moon seen by Voyager 1 (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02244). ;)

http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/browse/PIA02244.jpg

lyford
2004-Dec-15, 11:54 PM
Clearly it's the same moon seen by Voyager 1 (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02244). ;)

Thanks Kullat Nunu those are some sweet pics!

frogesque
2004-Dec-16, 12:59 AM
Kullat Nunu wrote:


Dione in front of Saturn!

Quite the most serene yet surreal image I have seen of this mission so far. Space in all her magesty =D> =D>

lyford
2004-Dec-16, 01:59 AM
This one is quite alien-looking (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/raw-images-details.cfm?feiImageID=28866) (part of a Saturn mosaic)

I think that is a picture of the rings' shadow (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/raw-images-details.cfm?feiImageID=29023) on Saturn...

Another shot reveals it:
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/casJPGBrowseS06/W00003768.jpg

Here's to hoping the ESA has a better Christmas than last year...

AlexBlackwell
2004-Dec-16, 02:16 AM
Kullat Nunu wrote:


Dione in front of Saturn!

Quite the most serene yet surreal image I have seen of this mission so far. Space in all her magesty =D> =D>
Doug Ellison, who runs the Mars Exploration Rover Forum (http://mer.rlproject.com/), has a very good RGB composite (http://mer.rlproject.com/dione_above_clouds.jpg).

um3k
2004-Dec-16, 02:22 AM
Here's my version. (http://home.neo.rr.com/pzps/Dione_Saturn.jpg)

Tacitus
2004-Dec-16, 03:06 AM
Close-ups of Dione have started to be posted:

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/raw-images-list.cfm?browseLatest=1

Maksutov
2004-Dec-16, 03:30 AM
This view of Dione
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/casJPGBrowseS06/W00003856.jpg

leads one to think the moon has been claimed by the Klingon Empire.

http://img133.exs.cx/img133/9681/klingonlogo28nl.th.jpg (http://img133.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img133&image=klingonlogo28nl.jpg)

tlbs101
2004-Dec-16, 05:07 PM
Does anyone know why they apparently did not take any RADAR (SAR?)data on this pass?

AlexBlackwell
2004-Dec-16, 10:50 PM
Does anyone know why they apparently did not take any RADAR (SAR?)data on this pass?
Yes, because RADAR was not part of the pre-planned Tb flyby observations.

In fact, RADAR observations are only planned for 25 of the 44 Titan flybys during the primary mission, with the next set scheduled for T3 in February 2005.

There are a variety of reasons for this. The main one is that RADAR has to compete with other instruments taking data, and since it is mounted orthogonally to the orbital remote sensing (ORS) pallet, on which reside the ISS, UVIS, CIRS, and VIMS, then tradeoffs have to be made over who gets to point at Titan during any given flyby's closest approach (C/A). The same holds true for the fields and particles instruments, too.

RADAR also requires the RCS system to maintain attitude control during C/A, which affects the propellant margins for the tour.

ToSeek
2004-Dec-17, 05:56 PM
Titan's layered atmosphere (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/titan_layered_atmosphere.html?17122004)


On Cassini's recent flyby of Titan, scientists discovered that Saturn's largest moon has a surprising number of layers of haze in its atmosphere. These layers of haze extend several hundred kilometres above the moon's surface. This image was taken in ultraviolet, and then colourized on computer to look like natural colour.