PDA

View Full Version : Blood pressure medication



gzhpcu
2014-Feb-10, 07:37 AM
Having brought up the question of cholesterol medication, here is another point:

Blood pressure medication alternatives:

I have managed to practically cut my blood pressure medication in half (carefully monitoring my blood pressure values at home) with
These medications made me feel tired. So, I started investigating on the internet and found the following:

1) isometric hand grip excercises lower systolic blood pressure. I tried it and it works for me!
See: http://www.livestrong.com/article/23...lood-pressure/ (http://www.livestrong.com/article/239231-isometric-hand-exercises-to-lower-blood-pressure/)
also: http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Isometric+hand+grip+training%3A+a+natural+hyperten sive+therapy.-a0173189944


In recent years, isometric hand grip training has demonstrated the potential to be a promising anti-hypertensive option. Research completed on this training modality has revealed significant reductions in systolic and diastolic blood pressure up to 19 mmHg and 15 mmHg, respectively.

This did the most for me. Noticed the difference within 10 days.

2) certain foods lower systolic blood pressure:

2a) beet juice: http://www.webmd.com/hypertension-hi...blood-pressure (http://www.webmd.com/hypertension-high-blood-pressure/news/20121212/beetroot-juice-blood-pressure)
2b) dates lower blood pressure: http://naturalsociety.com/health-ben...at-date-fruit/ (http://naturalsociety.com/health-benefits-of-dates-7-reasons-eat-date-fruit/)
2c) green tea: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...a-healthy.html (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-196334/Why-green-tea-healthy.html)
2d) various other tips: http://www.wikihow.com/Lower-Blood-Pressure-Quickly

Now having more pep, I also have returned to doing sports more often, which also helps.

With all of the above, I have managed to reduce my medication by about one third and my energy is back. I, of course, monitor my blood pressure regularly, and am, in a controlled fashion, gradually decreasing the medication even more. Just as long as it remains around 125/70-80.

profloater
2014-Feb-10, 10:18 AM
I Am declaring an interest but for your information floating therapy lowers blood pressure significantly. Without medication obviously.

gzhpcu
2014-Feb-10, 11:38 AM
I Am declaring an interest but for your information floating therapy lowers blood pressure significantly. Without medication obviously.
I can understand that it is relaxing, and thereby, indirectly, reduces stress. But, if you don't have stress (I don't), not so sure of benefits in my case...

Cougar
2014-Feb-10, 12:31 PM
Good for you, Gaspacho (well, that's how I pronounce your handle). I'm not sure how much I would rely on websites named "livestrong" or "naturalsociety" though....

gzhpcu
2014-Feb-10, 12:40 PM
Good for you, Gaspacho (well, that's how I pronounce your handle). I'm not sure how much I would rely on websites named "livestrong" or "naturalsociety" though....
True, but I don't rely on any site. I try things out, and if they work for me, then I do it. :)

I also checked here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20009767


OBJECTIVE:To examine the efficacy of isometric handgrip exercise for reducing resting SBP and DBP in adult humans.
METHODS:Meta-analysis of studies retrieved from five electronic databases as well as cross-referencing from identified articles. The criteria for inclusion were randomized controlled trials published in any language over an approximate 38-year period (1 January 1971 to 1 February 2009), isometric handgrip training of at least 4 weeks performed by adults of at least 18 years of age, and data for changes in resting SBP and DBP available. Dual coding of studies was performed by both investigators. Data were analyzed a priori using random-effects models and nonparametric 95% bootstrap percentile confidence intervals (BCIs, 5000 iterations). Because of the small sample size, analyses were also performed using fixed-effects models post hoc.
RESULTS:Eighty-one men and women (42 exercise and 39 control) from three of 287 reviewed studies were pooled for analysis. Using random-effects models, statistically significant exercise minus control group reductions of approximately 10% were observed for both resting SBP and DBP (SBP: Xd , -13.4 mmHg; 95% BCI, -15.3 to -11.0 mmHg and DBP: X , -7.8 mmHg; 95% BCI, -16.5 to -3.0 mmHg). Results were also statistically significant when fixed-effects models were used (SBP: X , -13.8 mmHg; 95% BCI, -15.3 to -11.0 mmHg and DBP: X , -6.1 mmHg; 95% BCI, -16.5 to -3.2 mmHg).
CONCLUSION:Isometric handgrip exercise is efficacious for reducing resting SBP and DBP in adult humans. However, the generalizability of these findings is limited given the small number of studies included.

profloater
2014-Feb-10, 12:41 PM
I can understand that it is relaxing, and thereby, indirectly, reduces stress. But, if you don't have stress (I don't), not so sure of benefits in my case...
The temperature and freedom from postural work directly causes vasodilation,reducing blood pressure also improves what is called vagus nerve efficiency, the vagus nerve opposes adrenaline production.

gzhpcu
2014-Feb-10, 01:44 PM
The temperature and freedom from postural work directly causes vasodilation,reducing blood pressure also improves what is called vagus nerve efficiency, the vagus nerve opposes adrenaline production.
Any study to back this up? How long does benefit hold?

Copernicus
2014-Feb-10, 04:54 PM
Great to see people working to take charge of their own healthcare. Chocolate also is associated with lower blood pressure. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3286672/

Squink
2014-Feb-10, 05:11 PM
Noticed I had significantly lower BP (~20mm Hg)on winter days when I wore a sweater or similar skin covering, inside. Vasoconstriction in skin is a known factor:Can cold weather or seasonal changes in weather affect blood pressure? (http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/expert-answers/blood-pressure/faq-20058250)
Blood pressure generally is higher in the winter and lower in the summer. That's because low temperatures cause your blood vessels to narrow — which increases blood pressure because more pressure is needed to force blood through your narrowed veins and arteries.

In addition to cold weather, blood pressure may also be affected by a sudden change in weather patterns, such as a weather front or a storm. Your body — and blood vessels — may react to abrupt changes in humidity, atmospheric pressure, cloud cover or wind in much the same way it reacts to cold. These weather-related variations in blood pressure are more common in people age 65 and older. However, I turned up very little in the way of peer reviewed studies with Google Scholar.

NEOWatcher
2014-Feb-10, 07:18 PM
Great to see people working to take charge of their own healthcare. Chocolate also is associated with lower blood pressure. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3286672/
And lots of other detrimental effects.

Studies like that are good to determine factors in lowering blood pressure, but not for determing if something in itself is good or bad.

Unfortunately, those with the Choc stickers (http://www.clevelandrealestatenews.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/mysterious-bumpersticker.jpg) on their car stick to that story and cover their ears for any other studies on chocolate.

gzhpcu
2014-Feb-10, 07:53 PM
And lots of other detrimental effects.

Studies like that are good to determine factors in lowering blood pressure, but not for determing if something in itself is good or bad.

Unfortunately, those with the Choc stickers (http://www.clevelandrealestatenews.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/mysterious-bumpersticker.jpg) on their car stick to that story and cover their ears for any other studies on chocolate.

Dark chocolate is benefical to one's health. Like anything else, it should not eaten in excess. Consuming milk chocolate or white chocolate, or drinking fat-containing milk with dark chocolate, appears to largely negate the health benefit.

NEOWatcher
2014-Feb-10, 08:03 PM
Dark chocolate is benefical to one's health.
Only cardiovascular health. It is not beneficial to overall health.
Even dark chocolate has it's problems even in small amounts: Inflamation, addiction, as a stimulant, high in lead.
But; like you say. Excess is the real problem.

gzhpcu
2014-Feb-10, 08:49 PM
Yes, I should have said " cardiovascular health"....

Copernicus
2014-Feb-10, 09:14 PM
And lots of other detrimental effects.

Studies like that are good to determine factors in lowering blood pressure, but not for determing if something in itself is good or bad.

Unfortunately, those with the Choc stickers (http://www.clevelandrealestatenews.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/mysterious-bumpersticker.jpg) on their car stick to that story and cover their ears for any other studies on chocolate.

I just add two teaspoons of cocoa to my coffee in the morning. Hardly over doing it.

In this study cocoa was correlated to a 45-50 percent reduction in cardiovascular and all cause mortality. http://www.academia.edu/1501845/Cocoa_Intake_Blood_Pressure_and_Cardiovascular_Mor tality

I presume blood pressure to be part of that equation. I was not aware that cocoa had lead in it. I was hoping for some adamantium connection. I do know that in the late 1930's Americans had an average lead content of 40 ng/dl and now it is less than 2 ng/dl.

antoniseb
2014-Feb-11, 01:26 PM
This thread may be violating our "No Practicing Medicine" rule, and I am closing it while the team discusses it.
Possible outcomes:
- We might reopen the thread
- We might reopen the thread, but redact certain posts, and assess infraction points
- We might keep it closed and remove it

Note: the cholesterol thread will also be examined, but isn't closed as of this moment.