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View Full Version : Digital 0/I Michelson Morley - Possible or Not ?



Marosz
2014-Feb-19, 02:07 AM
Possible or Not ( see Y Tube ) ?

http://youtu.be/PNYiejnl0t0


Camera is open/close only for very !!! short time T ( light in vacuum need time T for distance L )

LED 120 000 000 Hz
Camera chip ( sensor ) full synchron. with LED


LED -------------L -------------- camera >>> 30 km/s


???

camera ----------L -------------- LED >>> 30 km/s

korjik
2014-Feb-19, 03:10 AM
Why would it make a difference. Individual light pulses are 2.5m long more than enough to interefere.

pzkpfw
2014-Feb-19, 04:55 AM
Marosz, according to relativity, if the camera and LED are in an inertial frame (not moving in relation to each other), then physics works for them the same as for any other inertial frame - including themselves if moving in different ways relative to some third thing.

So it doesn't matter whether your Camera+LED apparatus are moving or not, or what direction (with reference to any other thing), you'd get the same results.

If you do think you've got results that show directionality, I'd be much more inclined to think there's a fault in the experiment set-up, than that relativity has been proven incorrect.

(I believe the influence of gravity would have some effect, as that would mean you're no longer in an inertial frame - but it's beyond me to calculate or explain the effect.)

EigenState
2014-Feb-19, 05:25 AM
Greetings,


Marosz, according to relativity, if the camera and LED are in an inertial frame (not moving in relation to each other), then physics works for them the same as for any other inertial frame - including themselves if moving in different ways relative to some third thing.

So it doesn't matter whether your Camera+LED apparatus are moving or not, or what direction (with reference to any other thing), you'd get the same results.

If you do think you've got results that show directionality, I'd be much more inclined to think there's a fault in the experiment set-up, than that relativity has been proven incorrect.


To the best of my knowledge, the state of the art experimental results are those of S. Herrmann, A. Senger, K. Möhle, M. Nagel, E. Kovalchuk, and A. Peters, Rotating optical cavity experiment testing Lorentz invariance at the 10-17 level (http://arxiv.org/abs/1002.1284), Phys.Rev.D 80:105011 (2009).


We present an improved laboratory test of Lorentz invariance in electrodynamics by testing the isotropy of the speed of light. Our measurement compares the resonance frequencies of two orthogonal optical resonators that are implemented in a single block of fused silica and are rotated continuously on a precision air bearing turntable. An analysis of data recorded over the course of one year sets a limit on an anisotropy of the speed of light of \Delta c/c ~ 1 x 10-17. This constitutes the most accurate laboratory test of the isotropy of c to date and allows to constrain parameters of a Lorentz violating extension of the standard model of particle physics down to a level of 10-17.

Best regards,
ES

tusenfem
2014-Feb-19, 09:02 AM
Marosz, you had your thread about this topic.
You spend no time trying to actually write halfway understandable English.
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