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View Full Version : BUDGET 2015: Ukraine Crisis Not Disrupting Russian Soyuz Flights, NASA Admin Says



Fraser
2014-Mar-04, 09:00 PM
Astronauts are expected to leave the International Space Station on schedule next week, and training continues on the ground, despite a crisis in Ukraine that is disrupting American and Russian relations, NASA’s administrator said on Tuesday (March 4). Russian troops moved into the Crimea region of Ukraine last week, triggering condemnation from the United States […]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/110010/budget-2015-ukraine-crisis-not-disrupting-russian-soyuz-flights-nasa-admin-says/)

Glom
2014-Mar-04, 10:01 PM
Must be awkward onboard right now.

Maggnum
2014-Mar-04, 10:52 PM
I can't help but wonder what the US is going to do if Russia says no more flights for US/Western astronauts. Apply more sanctions? [/sarc] Seriously, this could have some pretty serious repercussions, especially of the US starts imposing sanctions or takes other action.

Swift
2014-Mar-04, 11:07 PM
No one has done anything inappropriate yet, but this thread makes me nervous.

There is to be absolutely no discussion of anything about the Ukraine crisis that isn't directly related to space flight. Serious infractions will be dished out for violations.

If you have comments to make that are not appropriate for CQ, please post them directly in the UT blog.

Maggnum
2014-Mar-04, 11:35 PM
Yea a timely caution Swift. My point, in case it needs clearing up, is how is the US going to get astronauts to the station if Russia says no more Soyuz? How close are Orbital or SpaceX to being able to bring people to the station?

Swift
2014-Mar-05, 02:35 PM
Yea a timely caution Swift. My point, in case it needs clearing up, is how is the US going to get astronauts to the station if Russia says no more Soyuz? How close are Orbital or SpaceX to being able to bring people to the station?
I suspect not close enough that it will make any difference in this situation - they are years away at best, unless some sort of emergency forces NASA to take a very high risk approach (I'm not saving Orbital's and SpaceX's designs are risky, I'm saying that we'd have to skip the years of planned testing and approvals).

Maggnum
2014-Mar-05, 09:26 PM
I suspect you're right Swift. I wonder how fast they could get up to speed if they ever faced a situation that required it? I seem to remember the SST astronauts commenting on how spacious the Dragon capsule was (and how it smelled like a new car!) I suppose if is "just" money, anything is possible, but realistically I wonder if Dragon could be brought into play in a matter of months instead of years.

Well, especially Dragon, but Orbital too for that matter. Obviously Virgin can't get there, am I missing anyone?

Maggnum
2014-Mar-05, 09:27 PM
James truck captain stumpy.

Garrison
2014-Mar-06, 12:52 AM
I suspect you're right Swift. I wonder how fast they could get up to speed if they ever faced a situation that required it? I seem to remember the SST astronauts commenting on how spacious the Dragon capsule was (and how it smelled like a new car!) I suppose if is "just" money, anything is possible, but realistically I wonder if Dragon could be brought into play in a matter of months instead of years.

Well, especially Dragon, but Orbital too for that matter. Obviously Virgin can't get there, am I missing anyone?
Boeing and the CST-100

Truck Captain Stumpy
2014-Mar-07, 03:43 AM
James truck captain stumpy.

why is the payload of Dragon halved for re-entry? is that for greater control and deceleration?

that Boeing CST-100 looks promising, but it also looks awful snug. It reports the ability to take 7, but given that I saw of the pic's on the site, that would be a tight squeeze, IMHO
its also set up for Atlas V (according to their site) but is it possible to mount to another rocket?
just wondering...