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cjackson
2014-Mar-12, 07:39 AM
I don't imagine starting a Saturn V is anything like starting an aircraft, let alone a car, so what was the procedure for turning on the rocket and making it go?

slang
2014-Mar-12, 10:33 AM
Planning to steal one?

Some info on the F-1 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocketdyne_F-1) engine here, or try searching NASA NTRS (http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp) for more technical information. This (http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?N=0&Ntk=all&Ntx=mode%20matchall&Ntt=19750070175) should be a link to "F-1 Rocket Engine Operating Instructions", but NTRS seems to be acting up right now. Or down, rather, if you're an IT guy.

Jens
2014-Mar-12, 10:49 AM
I would guess naively that it's fairly similar. In all cases you just have to get the fuel and oxidizer into the combustion chamber and then spark it. Not knowing all that much about it, the rocket engine sounds easier than a car engine, because you just have to keep the combustion going, there's no need to time it with cylinders. Of course, handling the fuel and oxidant is much harder with a liquid fuel rocket.

NEOWatcher
2014-Mar-12, 12:16 PM
I found this very good set of schematics (http://home.kpn.nl/panhu001/Saturn%20V/Saturn%20V%20info/F-1%20engine/F-1%20engine%20ignition%20sequence.html) on the firing sequence.

Ignoring all the hydraulic valve operations, there is a small combustion chamber fed from the main fuel lines that gets the pump going.

ozprof
2014-Mar-12, 02:30 PM
The best place I have found for details on anything Apollo is the Apollo Flight Journal. Excellent description in starting the Saturn V including diagrams. See here:- https://history.nasa.gov/ap08fj/01launch_ascent.htm

NEOWatcher
2014-Mar-12, 02:57 PM
The best place I have found for details on anything Apollo is the Apollo Flight Journal. Excellent description in starting the Saturn V including diagrams. See here:- https://history.nasa.gov/ap08fj/01launch_ascent.htm
Make sure the www is on the link. Otherwise you get a certificate error.
http://www.history.nasa.gov/ap08fj/01launch_ascent.htm
.

cjackson
2014-Mar-13, 01:12 AM
I get the impression that an F-1 engine works sort of like a gas turbine, but not exactly. Either way, that was fascinating and much appreciated.

publiusr
2014-Mar-13, 06:01 PM
Here is a nice article on the subject: http://www.thespacereview.com/article/2410/1

A blurb that may answer your question

"Another major change is how the engine starts up. The original F-1 was built somewhat like a wind-up clock: as one part of the startup sequence occurred it would mechanically or in some other way trigger the next part of the startup sequence and so on. Those who have looked at it today marvel at how clever it is. But they plan on replacing most of that with modern computer-controlled systems, which should also increase their ability to control and fine-tune the engine."