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psientelek
2014-Mar-23, 07:39 PM
As asked by Fraser Cain on March 17, 2014:

The answer, current emailer:

In 1558., Nostradamus, writing to Henry ll, mentions
the Chaldean Alphabet, and adds a code-number which is
long known in mythology, and is currently used in science
to indicate the estimated total of elemental particles in the
observable universe, i.e., 10^80th power.

Supernova predicted and verified by research unit at
Princeton University:

Answer: 273512/1080 (Kochab) - Known as a Guardian of
the Pole: See Pyramid jpg....
http://www.glyphweb.com/esky/stars/kochab.html

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The existing scientific concepts cover always only a very limited part
of reality, and the other part that has not yet been understood is
infinite. Whenever we proceed from the known into the unknown we may
hope to understand, but we may have to learn at the same time a new
meaning of the word `understanding'.
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: :::::::::::::::::::::::

(*Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research)

The lead professor at Princeton University: *Dr. Robert G. Jahn.
Jahn is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics
and Astronautics, and was Chairman of its' Electric
Propulsion Technical Committee. He is a member of the
NASA Space Science and Technology Advisory Committee..

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: :::::::::::::::::::::

In the early years of the last century, Einstein was a frequent
dinner guest of CG Jung. These conversations eventually led
Jung to the idea that psyche transcends space and time, i.e.,
"psychic relativity." Some years later, Jung met Professor
W. Pauli, the physicist, and their relationship provided
great insights into the nature of "mind" and reality....
Their letters were published under title, "atom and archetype."

http://www.amazon.com/Atom-Archetype-Pauli-Letters-1932-1958/dp/0415120780
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Two men from the same New York neighborhood. One becomes an
administrator at NASA, (Dan Goldin), the other, a manager at
RepublicNewYorkBank, and later, a verified seer....

Note: For several years, the current host of COSMOS, Dr.
Neil deGrasse Tyson, lived nearby, about 2.9 miles east of us.

How's that for coincidences?

As our friend Carl Sagan said: "what is obvious is sometimes
false, what is unexpected sometimes true."

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"such is the nature of reality, that anyone can experience that which
is least understood." TDL

Ref: http://www.innerexplorations.com/catchmeta/mys3.htm

Sincerely,

Laurence
psi.entelek.rch

Swift
2014-Mar-23, 08:19 PM
Hello psientelek, welcome to CQ.

I have to admit that I have no idea what you are talking about. What does this have to do with exploding stars and what is the central theme of these points?

Shaula
2014-Mar-23, 10:18 PM
Kochab mas a mass between 2 and 3 solar masses (although some estimates are as low as 1.5). It would need to gain more than 5 solar masses to be a type II supernova candidate. Even if you are actually talking about Polaris (also sometimes called Kochab in antiquity) it is only 4-5 solar masses, again too small.

NEOWatcher
2014-Mar-24, 05:50 PM
I have to admit that I have no idea what you are talking about.

Something about Nostradamus predicting that Einstein likes to eat at the homes of people he knows, and that a lot of people live within 2.9 miles of New York.

Noclevername
2014-Mar-24, 05:56 PM
Sorry, you lost me at "Nostradamus". And then threw me out of a moving car with "verified seer". Those two words don't go together...

psientelek
2014-Mar-25, 01:43 PM
There are other views besides yours, such as this one:

trails,sierraclub.

As you look at Kochab, ponder this: the star you see may no longer exist. It is at a stage of its life that it is ready to go supernova, and it may already have. But because Kochab lies 126 light-years away, the light you see now left the star 126 years ago, and in the time since then it may have exploded.
Perhaps one day we will look up at Kochab and see a bright flare of light, outshining all others for a time, and then eventually see a bubble of stellar debris become a new nebula.

Kelly Kizer Whitt loves clean, clear, and dark skies. Kelly studied English and Astronomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and worked for Astronomy magazine. She is currently the Feature Writer for Astronomy and Space -Suite101.

psientelek
2014-Mar-25, 02:39 PM
There are other views besides yours, such as this one:

trails,sierraclub.

As you look at Kochab, ponder this: the star you see may no longer exist. It is at a stage of its life that it is ready to go supernova, and it may already have. But because Kochab lies 126 light-years away, the light you see now left the star 126 years ago, and in the time since then it may have exploded.
Perhaps one day we will look up at Kochab and see a bright flare of light, outshining all others for a time, and then eventually see a bubble of stellar debris become a new nebula.

Kelly Kizer Whitt loves clean, clear, and dark skies. Kelly studied English and Astronomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and worked for Astronomy magazine. She is currently the Feature Writer for Astronomy and Space -Suite101.

psientelek
2014-Mar-25, 02:52 PM
It's obvious that - so far no one has any serious interest in this. There are
no appropriate questions, such as, how can there be a scientific verification-
on what basis was it verified, etc....

"psychic relativity" is a psycho-physics term, and it has no meaning to human
abilities, i.e., of a psychic nature.

Search the net for this: "acausal connections in the space-time
continuum" - W. Pauli, Nobel laureate physicist.

Also: http://www.tcm.phy.cam.ac.uk/~bdj10/

Welcome to the home page of Professor Brian Josephson, director of the Mind-Matter Unification Project of the Theory of Condensed Matter Group at the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, a project concerned primarily with the attempt to understand, from the viewpoint of the theoretical physicist, what may loosely be characterised as intelligent processes in nature, associated with brain function or with some other natural process. Project members: Brian Josephson, Takeo Oku, Plamen L. Simeonov, Madan Thangavelu, Steven M Rosen.

For those who can't fathom what I'm saying here; "have a seat and give
your brain a rest."

Cheers, Laurence

Strange
2014-Mar-25, 03:32 PM
It's obvious that - so far no one has any serious interest in this. There are
no appropriate questions, such as, how can there be a scientific verification-
on what basis was it verified, etc....

Scientific verification of what? I don't think anyone has any idea what you are talking about...

Strange
2014-Mar-25, 03:39 PM
There are other views besides yours, such as this one:

trails,sierraclub.

As you look at Kochab, ponder this: the star you see may no longer exist. It is at a stage of its life that it is ready to go supernova, and it may already have. But because Kochab lies 126 light-years away, the light you see now left the star 126 years ago, and in the time since then it may have exploded.
Perhaps one day we will look up at Kochab and see a bright flare of light, outshining all others for a time, and then eventually see a bubble of stellar debris become a new nebula.

Kelly Kizer Whitt loves clean, clear, and dark skies. Kelly studied English and Astronomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and worked for Astronomy magazine. She is currently the Feature Writer for Astronomy and Space -Suite101.

If anyone is curious where this came from, it can be found here: http://trails.sierraclub.org/ontrack/10-01-2010.aspx

Swift
2014-Mar-25, 04:29 PM
It's obvious that - so far no one has any serious interest in this. There are
no appropriate questions, such as, how can there be a scientific verification-
on what basis was it verified, etc....

psientelek,

Let me make it official. In your next post, you will succinctly explain what exactly you are talking about. If you do not, this thread will be closed.

Strange
2014-Mar-25, 04:33 PM
Search the net for this: "acausal connections in the space-time
continuum" - W. Pauli, Nobel laureate physicist.

Also: http://www.tcm.phy.cam.ac.uk/~bdj10/

All this shows is that even very bright people can have very silly ideas.

NEOWatcher
2014-Mar-25, 04:37 PM
Scientific verification of what? I don't think anyone has any idea what you are talking about...
I know I'm one of those.

What is the science we are to talk about on this thread?


There are other views besides yours, such as this one:
Views? What views. Has somebody stated an opinion about something?


As you look at Kochab, ponder this: the star you see may no longer exist. It is at a stage of its life that it is ready to go supernova, and it may already have. But because Kochab lies 126 light-years away, the light you see now left the star 126 years ago, and in the time since then it may have exploded.
No. As I understand it, being a K type star, the universe has not been around long enough.


Kelly Kizer Whitt loves clean, clear, and dark skies.
Doesn't every astronomer?

Shaula
2014-Mar-26, 12:50 AM
There are other views besides yours, such as this one:

trails,sierraclub.

As you look at Kochab, ponder this: the star you see may no longer exist. It is at a stage of its life that it is ready to go supernova, and it may already have. But because Kochab lies 126 light-years away, the light you see now left the star 126 years ago, and in the time since then it may have exploded.
Perhaps one day we will look up at Kochab and see a bright flare of light, outshining all others for a time, and then eventually see a bubble of stellar debris become a new nebula.

Kelly Kizer Whitt loves clean, clear, and dark skies. Kelly studied English and Astronomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and worked for Astronomy magazine. She is currently the Feature Writer for Astronomy and Space -Suite101.
Beta Ursa Minoris (the one we normally call Kochab) is about 130ly away and is a K4III class star about twice the mass of the Sun.
Polaris is about 400ly away and a F7Ib class star about 4-5 times the mass of the Sun.

Neither are supernova candidates and I really don't think that your citing a quotation from a dark skies trail blog (http://trails.sierraclub.org/ontrack/10-01-2010.aspx) will overturn pretty much everything we know about type II supernovae. The blog also makes it clear that they are not talking about Polaris, so the claim that a 2x Solar mass star will explode is utterly wrong. Find me a published, peer reviewed paper saying Kochab is within a hundred years of going supernova and maybe there would be something to discuss. Probably "How on earth did that get published" but it is still a discussion.

So no, I am not any more interested in this than I am in any other physically implausible wild claims backed up by interpretations of translations of mystic literature.

Don Alexander
2014-Mar-26, 10:50 AM
Aw, and here I looked into this thread expecting a serious discussion on Betelgeuze vs. Eta Carinae vs. Sher 25 or something like that :|

Noclevername
2014-Mar-26, 11:45 AM
Aw, and here I looked into this thread expecting a serious discussion on Betelgeuze vs. Eta Carinae vs. Sher 25 or something like that :|

I thought it would be a celebrity gossip thread.

Glom
2014-Mar-26, 02:20 PM
I thought it would be a celebrity gossip thread.

Much in the same way Lucille Ball thought that Star Trek was about scouting out movie stars on the beach when she first heard about the project.

publiusr
2014-Mar-30, 08:01 PM
I can just see Shatner and the crew doing Beach Blanket Bingo.

swampyankee
2014-Apr-02, 10:46 PM
Much in the same way Lucille Ball thought that Star Trek was about scouting out movie stars on the beach when she first heard about the project.

I'm sure that Shatner was looking for Kirk's next lust interest.