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beskeptical
2004-Dec-19, 01:40 AM
My sister-in-law just had a massive heart attack. I feel so bad. They just got married in October. She has a 9 year old daughter. It's only a week before Christmas. This is just so unfair.

She is 'stable'' but she's in intensive care and isn't awake. It happened yesterday. Her mom did CPR but her mom is in her 70s so we don't know how effective it was. The EMTs got her heart going after several shocks. I hope she didn't have brain damage.

My brother was in LA on business. They live in Medford, OR. He had to drive back because the airports from SF to Portland were fogged in. He got there this morning but he hasn't called back yet to say how she is. He called me while he was driving home.

She's at the hospital she works at. She is the head of their neonatal intensive care unit there. I am glad of that because my brother will have lots of support from their friends there.

She didn't have a healthy heart to begin with. She had even been on the heart transplant list before but got better. I just don't know what is going to happen now.

This is just so sad.

SeanF
2004-Dec-19, 02:10 AM
That's terrible. :cry: Know that our thoughts and prayers are with you and your family.

Metricyard
2004-Dec-19, 02:12 AM
Sorry to hear about this.

Our prayers go out to your sister-in-law.

She'll do ok. California has top notch doctors. Have them to thank me for keeping me alive many years ago (menengitis).

ToSeek
2004-Dec-19, 02:20 AM
That sounds terrible, but you know our thoughts are with you. Hope it works out.

Hutch
2004-Dec-19, 02:36 AM
I don't pray, but I am thankful that her Mom knew CPR (how many people don't) and that the EMT's had defibrillator equipment.

I do hope she recovers and can go on with her life. My mom was in and out of hospitals the last two years of her life, there is nothing pleasant to be said about ICU--except that they are there and do the job so well.

I'll be thinking about you. Let us know.

TrAI
2004-Dec-19, 02:45 AM
That is sad. I hope she recover and does not suffer any lasting problems from this.

Candy
2004-Dec-19, 02:47 AM
beskeptical, I do hope everything turns out for the best. :(

beskeptical
2004-Dec-19, 02:57 AM
Thanks everyone, I'll keep you posted.

The Supreme Canuck
2004-Dec-19, 03:03 AM
I'm so sorry. Just remember we're here for you.

Kizarvexis
2004-Dec-19, 03:50 AM
My family's thoughts and prayers and with you and your family.

Kizarvexis

Tensor
2004-Dec-19, 05:15 AM
beskeptical, I just so sorry to hear about this. You and your family will be in my thoughts.

Chip
2004-Dec-19, 05:25 AM
Keeping hopeful thoughts for a positive outcome.

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Dec-19, 05:49 AM

Andromeda321
2004-Dec-19, 05:59 AM
Oh man, that's just so awful. My thoughts are with you and your family. :(

mike alexander
2004-Dec-19, 06:23 AM
Everyone in this strange little community is on your side, beskeptical.

As you have time, let folks know how your family is getting along. Your forte' is explaining. It might help, and we will listen.

paulie jay
2004-Dec-19, 09:01 AM
Thinking of you - I'm sure all will turn out right. :)

SpacedOut
2004-Dec-19, 01:15 PM
Very Sad. My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family.

As Mike A. said, your forte' is explaining. I'm sure your gifts will be able to help your family, especially her daughter and don't forget we're here if you need us.

Tranquility
2004-Dec-19, 04:12 PM
I cannot begin to imagine how terrible you feel right now, and my words can't surpass the folks here, so all I can say is I hope for the best, and hopefully everything will turn out okay in the end. Just keep looking ahead at that glimmer of hope and hopefully she'll be back up soon, just in time for the holidays. Meanwhile you can be sure that there'll be a collective ear around here listening to you whenever you need it.

frogesque
2004-Dec-19, 04:38 PM
I hope you have had some better news over the weekend beskeptical. Our support is the only practical hep we can give and you know we are here.

Normandy6644
2004-Dec-19, 04:59 PM
You and your family will be in my thoughts and prayers. Hopefully things will work out.

Jim
2004-Dec-19, 06:28 PM
My thoughts are with you and your family, b. I hope your sister-in-law has a full and speedy recovery.

kucharek
2004-Dec-19, 07:05 PM
My best wishes to your sister-in-law and your whole family. If she's on a good way at christmas, don't let yourself get subdued by having her in hospital that time of the year. She surely wouldn't like to be the reason why her family can't enjoy christmas.

Harald

beskeptical
2004-Dec-19, 10:13 PM
Thanks again guys. You do make me feel better.

Well it's not quite 48 hours and she isn't awake yet. She is on a ventilator and sedated for that. I don't know if they will be taking her off soon but I hope so. Spontaneous breathing by day 2 is a good sign. She had some minimal responses to stimuli. That's OK as long as she responds more significantly by day 3.

I guess she had serious cardiomyopathy as my brother has now asked the name of her condition. The good news is her poorly functioning heart is no worse. In other words, while she went into cardiac arrest, there may not have been any additional heart muscle damage. So I guess 'massive' was the wrong term. That's good.

The hospital has one of the leading cardiac care departments in the country. That is also good.

My brother and sister-in-law have a lot of community support. The fire department chief is a neighbor and friend. His daughter was actually visiting Barb's daughter at the time this happened. He got there as quickly as the fire crew did. They think it was about 11 minutes from the call to the defib. So it still leaves the big question of how well the CPR was.

I think the fact the heart restarted with defib indicates there was good perfusion. It is rare for defib to work after 10 minutes according to the folks who sell the 'at home' defib devices, but then that could be marketing figures rather than research figures.

We should have a much better picture of her prognosis tomorrow.

Musashi
2004-Dec-19, 10:34 PM
I hope everything turns out ok. Over the summer, my family had a similar scare.

Gullible Jones
2004-Dec-19, 11:43 PM
My god... I am so sorry about this. :cry: I hope she recovers.

My best wishes to you, your brother, and your sister-in-law, and to her daughter...

{{{Beskeptical}}}

Sammy
2004-Dec-20, 12:11 AM
My thoughts and hopes will with you. Wish we could do more!

mike alexander
2004-Dec-20, 06:27 AM
Based on your early Monday report, that's what my wife calls 'good bad news'. It wasn't an infarct.

Argos
2004-Dec-20, 01:04 PM
This is very sad. My thoughts are with you. I hope everything turn out to be ok very soon. May you have the strength to withstand this unfortunate event.

CTM VT 2K
2004-Dec-20, 02:03 PM
The very fact that she survived for more than an hour after the EMT's got to her is a VERY positive sign. Every hour thereafter improves the odds of recovery. As an exipirenced EMT, I have a few thoughts to add.

All Cardiac Arrests are Heart Attacks, but not all Heart Attacks are Cardiac Arrests. People often use the terms interchangeably. There are Infarctions (temporary or permananet loss of O2 supply to heart muscle), Ischemia (insufficent O2 supply). Both cause pain, and are considered to be a Heart Attack. An MI (Myocardial Infarction) is the more serious of the two). Usually an MI means that a portion of the heart muscle dies.

Congestive Heart Failure - sounds much worse than it is (though it is not a good thing). CHF doesn't mean the heart has stopped, in fact you can occasionally meet CHF patients who are still able to walk around. Their heart is very poor, very weak, and without proper treatment it will eventually kill the patient.

A heart has several rhythms. Most have what is called a Normal Sinus Rhythm, but damage to heart muscle (or other medical conditions) can cause variations, including Vetricular Fibruillations, Atrial Fibruillations, and Asystole. The former two the heart is still trying to beat, but not doing so in a coherent manner, and is thus unable to pump blood (at least in sufficent volume to sustain life). The latter is a flat-line. A Defibruillator sends an electrical pulse through the heart that stops it, and allows its internal electrical system to restart in a coherent manner. This is why Asystole (flat-line) is not shockable - the heart is already stopped. When the heart is in a fibruillation or asystole (i.e. not pumping blood) it is a Cardiac Arrest.

A Heart Attack typically presents with chest pain, difficulty breathing, nausea, sweating etc. In TV this is shown by having an actor with makeup to be pale, and sweating, they'll clutch their left arm to their chest and collapse. Sometimes the Heart Attack is the result of an infarction, and it will cause the heart to fibruillate. When this happens, the patient will collapse. If nothing is done to the patient (bystanders panic, nobody calls 911 etc.) then the patient will begin to suffer brain damage within a few minutes. If someone intervenes with CPR within a minute, that will allow some oxygenation of the blood and profusion of the brain. We would prefer to defibruillate within a minute of arrest, but reality is rarely so friendly.

In this instance, the patient collapsed, and CPR was begun almost immediately. Good. The EMTs arrived in about 10 minutes. Good (sometimes it can be a very long responce time depending on call volume and location). Defibruillation revived the patient on scene. VERY good. This is a very good sign that the intervening CPR had been adequate. I have worked Cardiac Arrest calls where the patient had only been down for 5 or 6 minutes, with CPR, and we never got them back. I worked one where we revived the patient within a minute of arrest (we were already there when he arrested), and delivered him to the ER Awake, Alert, and Oriented - only to have him die from his complete Myocardial Infarction about 30 minutes later.

My family has been devistated by Heart Disease and Heart Attacks over the years, and I have lost most of my Cardiac Arrest patients. The reality is most patients who arrest before the EMTs get there never are revived. I don't want to downplay the tragedy of the situation, but this case sounds like it is that 1/100 survival stories.

My hopes and prayers go with you and your family in this time of crisis. I hope everybody else can learn from it, and I urge EVERYONE to learn CPR. It DOES save lives.

Swift
2004-Dec-20, 02:28 PM
beskeptical, I hope for the best for you and your sister-in-law and your whole family. I'm glad you have a lot of support. Please take care.

gethen
2004-Dec-20, 02:33 PM
Gone all weekend and just found this thread. I am so sorry, Beskeptical. Many years ago my own father had a rather serious, life-threatening stroke at this time of year, and I know how hard it can hit. At the time of year when most of us are really thinking about family and planning those wonderful get-togethers, one of your members is struggling to hold on. I will be thinking about you and your family and hoping for the best.

captain swoop
2004-Dec-20, 02:46 PM
A mate of mine had a heart attack a month or so ago, he had Stent pipes put in and is lined up for a double bypass. He was out on his mountain bike at the time it happened and always thought he was fairly fit. Docs reckon the damage was done years ago though. Anyway he is 41, same age as me and it makes you think. :(

gzhpcu
2004-Dec-20, 03:26 PM
My thoughts are with you too. I know how you feel. I just lost my dear Mom 2 months ago. Only lucky thing was that she died in her sleep.

beskeptical
2004-Dec-21, 02:59 AM
Not good news today, I'm afraid. She has only pupil and pain response and it has reached 72 hours. She is still on the ventilator. Odds of brain recovery are not very high.

The doctors are telling my brother to figure on a 5% chance. They based it on how many folks survive out of hospital cardiac arrest. (Remember, we are talking arrest, not MI.)

I found some research indicating a person still in a coma of the level she is in after 3 days had only about a 15% chance of recovery to any reasonable mental function.

This was not a good day.

Tobin Dax
2004-Dec-21, 03:36 AM
I'm sorry to hear the lack of good news, beskeptical. My thoughts are with you and your family, and I hope for the best.

SpaceTrekkie
2004-Dec-21, 03:39 AM
I am very sorry to hear about this unfortionate event, and the bad news. My thoughts and prayers are with her and your family. and people do recover agianst the odds (the brother of some of the people at my school had a major stroke and was in a coma and given only a 5% chance to live. tho he will never fully recover he is supposed to be home for christmas).

I wish you well.

-ST

Doe, John
2004-Dec-21, 03:56 AM
I offer my best wishes for the recovery of your sister-in-law. Things like this are always so traumatic because they happen so suddenly and often with little or no warning. Deepest sympathy for you and your brother.

gzhpcu
2004-Dec-21, 04:56 AM
So very sorry to hear this sad news. This should be a season of happiness and joy. You wonder why such bad things happen to nice people. It is unimagineable to know what your poor brother is going through during this dreadful period. We can only pray for a miracle. Be thinking of them. Events like this put everything in perspective. Life is very fragile. Courage.

Maksutov
2004-Dec-21, 06:26 AM
My thoughts are with you, beskeptical.

-Mak.

beskeptical
2004-Dec-21, 08:31 AM
Thanks everyone.

On a positive note, I found lots of accounts on the net within the medical lit. that at least say all hope is not yet lost. We'll have to see what tomorrow brings.

mike alexander
2004-Dec-21, 07:45 PM
Indeed, there is still hope, where we tell Fate to go screw itself.

Hope is the thing with feathers
That perches in the soul,
And sings the tune without the words,
And never stops at all

SciFi Chick
2004-Dec-21, 08:21 PM
Here's hoping she ends up in the minority percentile.

Meteora
2004-Dec-22, 05:47 AM
Just now noticed this thread. 8-[

Like everyone else, I'm very sorry to hear this and hope she recovers, despite the odds. :(

beskeptical
2004-Dec-22, 11:23 PM
No improvement, through day 5. Talk is now about when to stop all efforts. I told my brother to wait as long as possible because he might have later regrets if he reads about those rare cases of recovery.

This is just so sad. I can't stand X-mas music in the stores. All the songs are about how good things are this time of year.

He's already upset they didn't buy a home defib. device. There's just no way to go back and make different decisions. He is talking about getting the devices for other locations like the golf course they go to. That is more positive action.

I'm going to find out why out of hospital cardiac arrests have such a poor outcome when you pass that 4-5 minute mark with CPR. We are lucky in this area fire response time is less than 4 minutes from the call. Where my brother lives it was 10 minutes. And that made all the difference.

frogesque
2004-Dec-23, 01:15 AM
beskeptical Sorry to hear your latest news.

Day 5 doesn't sound good. Hard I know but sometimes it is better to grieve than to watch a hopeless situation for months or years. Christmas will be awful this year but it is only a day. You have to think of what it really means; a celebration of new beginings. Take a little time to yourself as well because you will need to be the anchor and strength for your brother and you cannot take that role if you have no reserves of your own to fall back on. Eat reasonably when you feel able and above all rest when you can.

When others round about are having fun and you feel so sad it's natural to want to scream out loud and make them feel your pain but that anger, sense of loss and unfairness will subsides in time and you will start to remember the good in her life and all she meant to those who knew and loved her.

My own father died in small pieces, little at a time, as I saw him go downhill (diabetes, circulation shot, amputation of one leg and expected to loose the other before a heart attack finally claimed him). My mother too, now aged, wracked with arthritis and befuddled with dementia not knowing whether it's Christmas or Tuesday. Being in a situation where you can neither mourn nor progress is it's own special nightmare and I would wish it on no one.

Hang on and hope while that hope is still reasonable but quality of life has to mean something too. Departing with dignity is also noble and rare, and letting go is sometimes the hardest part of loving.

We could all be wrong and she may yet pull through but be guided by the professional team that are caring for her because I know they will not loose one of their own withought a good fight.

My thoughts are with you.

lyford
2004-Dec-23, 05:41 AM
I am sorry to hear of this sad news - being caught by the suddeness of the arrest and then dealing with the slowness of waiting for recovery must demand so much from you all. My thoughts are with you.

beskeptical
2004-Dec-23, 08:07 AM
Actually, I think my brother has come to terms that she won't make it. He hasn't overdone the denial or hope thing. I do want her daughter to have time though. I think a few extra days of hope and denial could make it a bit easier for her. They need to wait until after Christmas. It will help them all get through that day if they can be with her, even if she isn't awake.

It really makes you want to tell your loved ones you love them. You or they could be gone in an instant. Don't forget that this Christmas. Hug your kids and all that.

:cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:

Maksutov
2004-Dec-23, 08:53 AM
[edit]It really makes you want to tell your loved ones you love them. You or they could be gone in an instant. Don't forget that this Christmas. Hug your kids and all that.
Not only on xmas but every day that provides the opportunity. That's part of what caring about other people is all about. Don't leave them guessing!

Here's a [hug] for you, beskeptical.

Swift
2004-Dec-23, 10:28 PM
beskeptical, my thoughts continue to be with you and your family. I've had relatives go suddenly and slowly, I've never figured out which is worse. I wish you the best.


I'm going to find out why out of hospital cardiac arrests have such a poor outcome when you pass that 4-5 minute mark with CPR. We are lucky in this area fire response time is less than 4 minutes from the call. Where my brother lives it was 10 minutes. And that made all the difference.
To answer your question, the four minute mark is critical because in adults, the brain generally starts suffering damage after that point with no circulation. The sad truth is CPR is better than nothing, CPR increases your odds, but the odds are still poor unless advanced medical care is started quickly. Some numbers in this article (http://www.scienceblog.com/community/older/2001/A/200110656.html)

I think your brother's idea of getting emergency defibulators is a great idea, but you should all give yourselves some time to think about this, to figure out what's best.

<edited to fix some typos and a bad link>

Raptor1967
2004-Dec-23, 10:56 PM
http://globaleffort.ca/symp.gif

beskeptical
2004-Dec-26, 11:47 AM
...
To answer your question, the four minute mark is critical because in adults, the brain generally starts suffering damage after that point with no circulation. The sad truth is CPR is better than nothing, CPR increases your odds, but the odds are still poor unless advanced medical care is started quickly. Some numbers in this article (http://www.scienceblog.com/community/older/2001/A/200110656.html)...Thanks for your thoughts Swift. I just wanted to clarify that I know why the brain dies after about 4 minutes. What I am having a hard time with is wondering why I have been under the impression in my long nursing career that all the CPR training we do actually did some good. I am not sure it is better than nothing if all the time, effort and cost put into training the public to do CPR only saves an extra 5% of the persons who arrest.

Obviously saving even 5% is worthwhile, but how many people could we save if those resources were spent elsewhere?

My sister-in-law had a poorly functioning heart muscle to begin with. So the fact CPR failed her would be understandable. But the stats the doctors gave my brother indicated CPR just did not do what I have been under the impression it did all these years.

The heart association is in the process of reviewing the research to make changes in their recommendations for CPR guidelines next month. I e-mailed them my professional feedback that I think they should add elevating a person's legs if there is a third person available to do so. That would increase blood returning to the heart so there is more blood to pump and more blood would go to the brain with each chest compression. There is just no reason to perfuse one's legs under those circumstances.

Unfortunately, I'm sure they would never make such a change in the guidelines until someone does the research. But maybe someone will decide to test the idea. I'm also going to use my connections with the Medic program here in Seattle to see if I can get someone interested in studying it. It just makes so much sense to me I can't understand why it hasn't been attempted yet. If I were doing CPR in the field, I would do it given this experience.


I'm not sure I should put this much personal information on the BB, but here's news article (http://www.mailtribune.com/archive/2004/1222/local/stories/14local.htm) on Barbara for as long as the link works. She really was an amazing person so it seems appropriate to share some things. The photo doesn't look anything like her. It makes her look much older than she really looks.

Here's the article because it may cycle off the web site after a few more days. If the link continues I'll edit this out next week so as not to be copying the whole article.
On the longest night of the year, candles burned in Medford to honor a nurse who has touched the lives of families across Southern Oregon.

Barbara Roberts of Central Point lay in the critical care unit Tuesday at Rogue Valley Medical Center while her colleagues and friends gathered at the hospital to pray for her, light candles, and recall her work with premature infants.

Roberts, 44, was hospitalized Friday after her heart stopped beating. She has been a nurse in RVMC’s neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for 10 years.

Colleagues said her compassion for premature infants and her confident, outgoing way with parents made her well-loved.

"Parents always love Barb," said Terry Russell, another NICU nurse. "They always come back to show her their babies."

Roberts organized a huge garage sale in February to raise money for three RVMC nurses whose families were struggling to pay medical bills. Roberts arranged for several dozen people to collect toys, furniture, appliances, kitchenware and clothing and bring it to the Medford Moose lodge. Proceeds from the sale were split equally among the three families.

"If you had a need and she knew about it, she’d try to fix it," Russell said.

"She’s helped hundreds of families and babies," said her husband, Steve Switzer.

"We can’t go to dinner without running into a family she knows who had a kid in NICU."

Roberts holds a master’s degree in nursing, and she worked for several years with Australia’s Royal Flying Doctor Service. She delivered more than 500 babies in remote areas of Australia before coming to Southern Oregon about 10 years ago with her daughter, Elena.

She found work at RVMC, where she managed the NICU for several years before returning to direct patient care.

"She makes you feel like everything’s going to be OK," said Stephanie Atkinson. Atkinson met Roberts in December 2002, when her son, Perry, was born during her 24th week of pregnancy. "She makes you feel like everything’s going to be all right. Makes me sad to read it. :cry: :cry: :cry:

2004-Dec-26, 01:16 PM
All our thoughts are with you... :( :( :( :(

Lurker
2004-Dec-26, 09:54 PM
My thoughts are with all of you... I only wish I had words of wisdom, but I have none... :cry:

May the goddess watch over them...

Andromeda321
2004-Dec-27, 03:34 AM
beskeptical- There's not much more one can say in a situation such as this really. But nonetheless here's a poem I came accross when my grandmother passed away last year that helped me out. With luck it will help you through this troubled time at least a little bit.

Do Not Stand at my Grave and Weep
by Mary Frye

Do not stand at my grave and weep,
I am not there, I do not sleep.

I am a thousand winds that blow.
I am the diamond glint on snow.
I am the sunlight on ripened grain.
I am the gentle autumn rain.

When you wake in the morning hush,
I am the swift, uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circling flight.
I am the soft starlight at night.

Do not stand at my grave and weep.
I am not there, I do not sleep.
(Do not stand at my grave and cry.
I am not there, I did not die!

Swift
2004-Dec-27, 03:52 PM
<skip>
Obviously saving even 5% is worthwhile, but how many people could we save if those resources were spent elsewhere?

Sorry, forgot you were a nurse. My impression from outside the field (was an EMT 20 years ago) is that the emphasis is now on early AED (Automatic Emergency Defibulators) and less on CPR. I wonder if that will continue to be the trend. Good luck on pushing the studies, I think that's a great idea.

Very nice article, thanks for sharing.
Roberts holds a master’s degree in nursing, and she worked for several years with Australia’s Royal Flying Doctor Service. She delivered more than 500 babies in remote areas of Australia before coming to Southern Oregon about 10 years ago with her daughter, Elena. That sounds like an amazing experience.

Klausnh
2004-Dec-27, 10:57 PM
I'm saddened by the news of your sister-in-law's condition. May you and your family find the strength in each other to get you through this awful time.
Klaus

beskeptical
2004-Dec-28, 08:51 PM
My brother called this morning. They were taking my sister-in-law off life support in the next few minutes so I assume she has now passed on.

I can't change the past so I am going to change the future. I am going to find out why we don't have people elevate a person's legs when they are giving CPR, (if there is a third person there to do so). Brain death occurs even with CPR and maybe something as simple as raising one's legs could make a difference.

Just seems like a bad year for some. (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=387489#387489)

Swift
2004-Dec-28, 08:54 PM
beskeptical, I'm so sorry for your loss. I once again wish the best for you and your family. I think it's terrific that you are turning this into a way to help others. Good luck.

Doe, John
2004-Dec-29, 01:30 AM
Deepest sympathy on your family's loss. Be strong.

Jim
2004-Dec-29, 06:17 PM
Be, you have my very deep sympathies and condolences. I wish I knew the words that would make your grief easier. All I can suggest is, don't try to tough it out. Spend time with your family, talk about how you feel, share memories of your sister-in-law - especially the times you laughed together.

Take care.

Moose
2004-Dec-29, 07:35 PM
Be, you have my sympathy.

Mars
2004-Dec-29, 08:31 PM
I'm sorry for you and your family. Lets hope the new year brings you better.

Doodler
2004-Dec-29, 08:46 PM
When you're that close to the edge, there are no efforts to preserve life that can be considered wasted, regardless of the outcome. A long shot is often all most of us are ever given.

My condolences.

Spacewriter
2004-Dec-29, 11:15 PM
Be,

Sorry to read all this. I know exactly what you went through because we had an almost identical experience with my father-in-law some years ago. In his case we knew within about five hours that he probably wasn't going to make it, but he didn't come off the ventilator for a day and a half while the doctors did all the tests they could. The waiting was difficult, but it did give us some chance to come to terms with the situation.

You and your family are in my thoughts.

Maksutov
2004-Dec-30, 06:45 AM
beskeptical, sorry to hear that things turned out as they did. You are in my thoughts.

kylenano
2004-Dec-30, 09:41 AM
You have my sympathies too.

Padawan
2004-Dec-30, 10:11 AM
Good God!

I hope everything gets well for you and your family, beskeptical!!

Wally
2004-Dec-30, 01:18 PM
My deepest condolenses Be. As others have said, our best way to remember those who've past is to keep in mind all the happy times we've shared with them. Here's to those happy times.

beskeptical
2004-Dec-30, 07:06 PM
She died yesterday, about 24 hours after they took the ventilator off. Thanks again for all your kind words and thoughts. We lost a really great person. :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Dec-30, 07:18 PM
I'm sorry beskeptical

Doe, John
2004-Dec-30, 11:19 PM
<<hugs>>

Laser Jock
2004-Dec-30, 11:19 PM
She died yesterday, about 24 hours after they took the ventilator off. Thanks again for all your kind words and thoughts. We lost a really great person. :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:

My deepest sympathy to you beskeptical. I just returned from the funeral for the father of a close friend (I would also call him a close friend). He died quietly in his sleep on Christmas Eve. He was only 60. This has been a sad Christmas.

Meteora
2004-Dec-31, 05:32 AM
She died yesterday, about 24 hours after they took the ventilator off. Thanks again for all your kind words and thoughts. We lost a really great person. :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:

And


My deepest sympathy to you beskeptical. I just returned from the funeral for the father of a close friend (I would also call him a close friend). He died quietly in his sleep on Christmas Eve. He was only 60. This has been a sad Christmas.

:(

These things are bad enough any time of year, but seem particularly sad during a holiday season. My sympathies to both of you.

mike alexander
2004-Dec-31, 08:39 AM
I read the article you posted Skep, and she was indeed an amazing person. Like Kant said: To be is to do. And she most obviously did.