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banquo's_bumble_puppy
2004-Dec-21, 11:33 AM
What if there were a magic pill or some sort of treatment that a person could take that would enable them to compose great music or be a talented artist/musician, etc... Would the art created by such people still have value?

skwirlinator
2004-Dec-21, 11:51 AM
I ask this;
What if life was found on a planet within our reach, It had a similar environment as Earth and for all intent it was just Like Earth?

Would Life still have meaning?
Would Trees and Grass and elephants and birds still be important.
Would people lose value?

Candy
2004-Dec-21, 11:52 AM
One might find similarity with the artists of the 60's, and their music is still quite popular today. :D

ToSeek
2004-Dec-21, 02:27 PM
What if there were a magic pill or some sort of treatment that a person could take that would enable them to compose great music or be a talented artist/musician, etc... Would the art created by such people still have value?

I think you judge the work of art, not how it came to be. If it's great art, it's great art.

Ut
2004-Dec-21, 03:00 PM
And what's considered great art differs by just about everybody. Besides, in one way or another, everyone is already out there making great art. Sometimes they just don't know it, or consider what they're doing an art. Meanwhile, someone else may find their doings wonderful.

01101001
2004-Dec-21, 07:01 PM
What if there were a magic pill or some sort of treatment that a person could take that would enable them to compose great music or be a talented artist/musician, etc...

First you'd have to convince me that art is a skill that basically exists in a vacuum, maybe like the ability to do arithmetic well -- something that doesn't depend on education, knowing what other artists have done, having significant experiences, and nothing about new ideas and ways of making other people think about them.

For instance, perhaps you could create a pill that would make people compute better, but would those people really compute things worth computing? Would they compute what's important, or just do more of the same-old, faster and more accurately? Would their computations change other people's lives?

Perhaps you could create a pill that would make people better at crafts. Maybe their color sense would improve. Maybe their hand-eye coordination would get better, and so forth. Would they really be better artists? Would their creations say new and better things or would they just be prettier? Would their creations change other people's lives?

I think your question denigrates what art really is -- or else it way elevates what a pill, magic or not, when you get down to it a dose of chemicals, even if it's some DNA-chemical gene therapy that can change what a person is, can effect.

Andromeda321
2004-Dec-21, 08:25 PM
I always believed that the fact that 1+1=2 is within everyone's reach of understanding does not diminish its eloquence or beauty. I believe art would be the same. (Does that make sense?)

Nicolas
2004-Dec-21, 08:32 PM
The power of some poems is the fact that anyone could have come up with them, but only one person has, if that is a good translation of your point. The beauty of simplicity. You find it in architecture often too.

paulie jay
2004-Dec-22, 12:34 AM
What if there were a magic pill or some sort of treatment that a person could take that would enable them to compose great music or be a talented artist/musician, etc... Would the art created by such people still have value?


There is so much unconscious plagiarism in music that I don't really think it would matter. If it's good its good, in my opinion. Now on the subjuect of magic pills - John Lennon would never have written the song "She Said, She Said" had he not been under the influence of LSD, McCartney likewise with "Got To Get You Into My Life" about pot. Does this mean that these songs don't count because they weren't written without assistance? I don't think so. In fact many great works of music, art and poetry have been created using different forms of drugs.

As for art, it is possible for a person to come up with magnificent artworks using computers that would far outstrip their ability with the brush. I think we tend to judge art on its merits in conjunction with how it was achieved. Dadaist are revered for their method as well as their completed works.

Donnie B.
2004-Dec-22, 02:13 AM
... In fact many great works of music, art and poetry have been created using different forms of drugs.
Not to mention various forms and intensities of mental illness (e.g. Van Gogh).

paulie jay
2004-Dec-23, 05:04 AM
Well yes of course! I wasn't implying that one had to be under the influence. I was more trying to draw a parallel with Banquo's idea of a magic pill, and the idea that it already exists for certain people.