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wd40
2014-May-08, 12:13 AM
If they would have continued with their lunar program, the Soviets would probably have been able to put men on the Moon in 1974.

If they had done so, even just once, with Apollo long ended, would this have had any effect at all on NASA and Our Time Line?


http://img213.imagevenue.com/loc685/th_498074287_m_122_685lo.jpg (http://img213.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=498074287_m_122_685lo.jpg)

ravens_cry
2014-May-08, 01:14 AM
1974? Probably not so much, though we might have less conspiracy theorists focusing on Apollo. As you say, the Apollo moon landings were long over at that point. There is some circumstantial evidence that the Soviets attempted a manned mission in 1969 (http://www.astronautix.com/articles/theghoax.htm), which promptly failed when the first stage of the N1 malfunctioned.

NEOWatcher
2014-May-08, 11:48 AM
If they would have continued with their lunar program, the Soviets would probably have been able to put men on the Moon in 1974.
Where do you get that date from?


If they had done so, even just once, with Apollo long ended, would this have had any effect at all on NASA and Our Time Line?
If they kept trying, then the U.S. most likely wouldn't have cancelled Apollos 18-20 which would have brought the U.S. program into 1974 considering the rate of launches.

JustAFriend
2014-May-08, 01:56 PM
Only if the Soviets had a long-term plan of continuing exploration.

If they did a one-off stunt (or just a few), then nothing would have changed.

There were many political forces at work in the 1970s to rein in NASA and it's doubtful they would have changed their minds unless something big happened.

Romanus
2014-May-08, 07:44 PM
Given that the Soviet lead in space stations didn't jump-start a competing program in NASA after Skylab, I seriously doubt it would have changed our course.

Nicolas
2014-May-08, 07:58 PM
And just today, I read an article that Russia wants to colonize the moon by 2030, FWIW (the source was not the most reliable newspaper).

wd40
2014-May-11, 02:36 PM
Where do you get that date from?


My correction. Unmanned 1974, manned 1976:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soviet_manned_lunar_programs
Subsequently, the complete L3 lunar expedition complex with regular 7K-LOK and regular LK for Moon flyby and landing by full unmanned mission of future manned scenario was prepared for fifth launch of modified N1 rocket on August, 1974. If this and one subsequent mission had been successful, up to five Soviet manned N1-L3 expeditions would have been launched in 1976–1980.

NEOWatcher
2014-May-12, 01:33 PM
Given that the Soviet lead in space stations didn't jump-start a competing program in NASA after Skylab, I seriously doubt it would have changed our course.
Hard to say. The Salyut program was running at the time and that wasn't a multi-component station.
NASA was developing STS with the intention of the multi-component Space station Freedom.

If they were in direct response to the concept of Mir or if it was just the next logical step for both nations, I'm not sure, but the timing seemed to be close.

CJSF
2014-May-13, 12:25 PM
NASA was developing STS with the intention of the multi-component Space station Freedom.

Is this actually true? I seem to recall "Freedom" being proposed and discussed well after the STS was going on, after the first flights of Columbia and perhaps Challenger. Although the thought of using it to launch a station (or components) might have been on the table during its development, I don't think it was an original goal, nor does the chronology work out the way you have stated here.

CJSF

NEOWatcher
2014-May-13, 03:37 PM
Is this actually true? I seem to recall "Freedom" being proposed and discussed well after the STS was going on, after the first flights of Columbia and perhaps Challenger. Although the thought of using it to launch a station (or components) might have been on the table during its development, I don't think it was an original goal, nor does the chronology work out the way you have stated here.
Yes; I worded that awkwardly. Not Freedom in particular, but designed with component construction as one possible task.

Nicolas
2014-May-13, 08:04 PM
Lots of artwork I have in books that slightly predate STS, show it docked to large constructions in space that are clearly made up of fits-in-shuttle-bay modules.