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Raptor1967
2004-Dec-23, 05:54 AM
I just had the most amazing thing happen While I was out walking my dogs. I have two Beautiful Pit bulls and we are out in the off leash area this morning when out of the woods ran three big coyotes. I couldn't believe it. I thought for sure I was about to be in for a bad fight when they started running around playing with my dogs paying absolutely no attention to me. At times coming to within 10 feet of me. . It was amazing to watch these wild animals running and playing with my dogs. I watched them for about 30 min before I called my dogs in as it was to cold for them to stay out much longer. :o

The Supreme Canuck
2004-Dec-23, 06:23 AM
Wow, that's... wow. Unexpected, to be sure. Are your dogs up-to-date on their vaccinations, though?

Raptor1967
2004-Dec-23, 06:37 AM
OH yea that is something we take care of consistently. The younger one spent a week at the vets with parvo about two years ago. So we are very careful.

The Supreme Canuck
2004-Dec-23, 06:42 AM
Great then! Did you have a camera with you? That'd be something to see.

Jobe
2004-Dec-23, 07:18 AM
Its all fun and games until your dogs start spawning half-coyotes

Raptor1967
2004-Dec-23, 07:25 AM
LOL thats Hilarious but they are both Fixed. And no unfortunatly I didnt have my camera wth me. Never again Will I leave without it.

beskeptical
2004-Dec-23, 08:15 AM
Totally amazing. I'm surprised the coyotes weren't more territorial and weren't more afraid of you.

Just the other day on TV I saw a dog on a leash playing with a wild polar bear on some documentary about Churchill, Canada. That was amazing too since dogs usually go after bears and/or polar bears are active hunters and carnivores. I had no idea they played like that on occasion.

Sammy
2004-Dec-23, 04:22 PM
Wow, this just proves how even the wild animals in Canada are more civil than here in the States!

Coyotes are spreading along the U.S. east coast now, and invading urbanized areas. According to all reports they are not playful, and have no fear of humans. There many stories of small dogs and cats being carried off by hunting packs. Some have actually entered suburban back yards while people were having barbeques, and carried off a pet.

A recent newspaper article reported sightings of packs hunting in daylight, and, contrary to normal habit, carrying their tails erect, not horizontal. The university wildlife expert interviewed thinks that they have figured out that doing so makes them appear more dog-like, and lets them get closer to prey before they are recognized as a threat!

Moose
2004-Dec-23, 04:46 PM
A recent newspaper article reported sightings of packs hunting in daylight, and, contrary to normal habit, carrying their tails erect, not horizontal. The university wildlife expert interviewed thinks that they have figured out that doing so makes them appear more dog-like, and lets them get closer to prey before they are recognized as a threat!

And pretty soon they'll be corresponding with mail order companies...

Raptor1967
2004-Dec-23, 05:05 PM
I have seen a lot of coyotes over the years and these three were obviously well fed due to their size. I have never seen that upright tail thing but it makes sense. They are the most intelligent animal I have seen up here aside from the bobcat. As a kid my dad would get me and my brothers out with the 22's to scare them away from the herds until they figured out the bullets couldn't hurt them if the didn't get close to us. Took the dogs out again this morning but didn't see them. Guess I was hoping they would want to play again but no luck.

Wally
2004-Dec-23, 06:50 PM
Man! I'm really surprised everyone got along! That's too cool!

teddyv
2004-Dec-23, 08:25 PM
That's really neat.

A colleague of mine, when previously working in the Yukon years ago (60's) ended up playing with some coyotes. They were not at all accustomed to people but more or less played like comesticated dogs.

Raptor1967
2004-Dec-23, 10:19 PM
Well after having a day to reflect on it I have come to the conclusion that Mother Nature was saying Merry Christmas to me. Up untill then I was not really in a happy mood but Since I find myself smiling and Actually Feeling the Christmas Spirit. Gonna Have to write a story about this, for some reason I feel inspired.

John Jones
2004-Dec-23, 10:40 PM
I just had the most amazing thing happen While I was out walking my dogs. I have two Beautiful Pit bulls and we are out in the off leash area this morning when out of the woods ran three big coyotes. I couldn't believe it. I thought for sure I was about to be in for a bad fight when they started running around playing with my dogs paying absolutely no attention to me. At times coming to within 10 feet of me. . It was amazing to watch these wild animals running and playing with my dogs. I watched them for about 30 min before I called my dogs in as it was to cold for them to stay out much longer. :o

Were they wearing Acme Rocket Skates? :D

Just kidding. Are coyotes rare in your area? They are apparently moving east.

The reason I ask is because I live near Memphis, Tennessee in the SE US, and coyotes have been showing up around here (well out of their traditional area) since at least the 1980s, and I mean in the inner city. They mate freely with domestic pets, apparently.

I've come across coyotes one at a time in wooded areas, and they stayed clear of me.

I'm no biologist, but I've been wondering what makes them a separate species from feral dogs.

John Jones
2004-Dec-23, 10:44 PM
A recent newspaper article reported sightings of packs hunting in daylight, and, contrary to normal habit, carrying their tails erect, not horizontal. The university wildlife expert interviewed thinks that they have figured out that doing so makes them appear more dog-like, and lets them get closer to prey before they are recognized as a threat!

And pretty soon they'll be corresponding with mail order companies...

AHA! I see we have another expert on the wiles of the coyote! :)

Maksutov
2004-Dec-24, 05:54 AM
When climbing Magazine Mountain, the highest point in Arkansas, back in 2002, I came face-to-muzzle with a coyote. Poor thing was really malnourished and haggard. Unfortunately all I had in my pack was water and chocolate. We stared at each other for a while and then ol' Wiley turned and left.

The coyote.
http://img154.exs.cx/img154/6107/magazinemountaincoyote4pj.th.jpg (http://img154.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img154&image=magazinemountaincoyote4pj. jpg)

View from park along the way to the summit.
http://img94.exs.cx/img94/6250/parkonthewaytothesummitmagazin.th.jpg (http://img94.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img94&image=parkonthewaytothesummitmaga zin.jpg)

The summit trail. Apparently in 2002 Arkansas used prisoners for trail maintenance. This was actually more surprising than the coyote. Felt like a scene from O Brother, Where Art Thou?
http://img145.exs.cx/img145/2195/summittrailmagazinemountain6oo.th.jpg (http://img145.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img145&image=summittrailmagazinemountai n6oo.jpg)

The summit marker. Low by Rockies and White Mountains standards, but the highest point, east to west, between the Appalachians and the High Plains.
http://img144.exs.cx/img144/1351/summitmarkermagazinemountain0v.th.jpg (http://img144.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img144&image=summitmarkermagazinemounta in0v.jpg)

Cliffs on the northwest side, looking toward Oklahoma.
http://img145.exs.cx/img145/4320/nwcliffsmagazinemountain3cu.th.jpg (http://img145.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img145&image=nwcliffsmagazinemountain3c u.jpg)

It was a great way to spend Columbus Day.

Bawheid
2004-Dec-24, 09:45 AM
They mate freely with domestic pets, apparently.

I've come across coyotes one at a time in wooded areas, and they stayed clear of me.

I'm no biologist, but I've been wondering what makes them a separate species from feral dogs.

My understanding is that if they can breed they are the same species. There are moves afoot to have wolves reclassified since they can breed with dogs, and presumably coyotes. So all should be classed as the same species.

(Awaits debunking from a biologist.)

Raptor1967
2004-Dec-24, 03:31 PM
I think one of the major differences is that Coyotes are loners they tend to be alone or with thier mate only grouping to take down large game which doesnt happen very often. Wolves and feral dogs hunt in packs and live as a community. I dont think the ability to mate determines the species but more the body type, and habits of the animal in question. Lots of animals can crossbreed that ae not of the same exact species.

beskeptical
2004-Dec-26, 11:12 AM
I have only ever seen coyotes alone as well. We have plenty of them here but I rarely see them. I hear them all the time and see the remnants of a few local cats on my walks in the park/woods behind my house.

They ate my brothers cat in Anaheim, CA. They kindly left the head on the front porch. :o Kind of distressing. It's pretty much the deep suburbs there. Amazing they can find hideouts anywhere.

tlbs101
2004-Dec-28, 12:33 AM
A front page article in one of the local Albuquerque newspapers 4 Sundays ago was about the coyote problem in Eastern Albuquerque (in the foothills of the Sandia mountains). The article mentioned some of the things already mentioned in this post: coyotes not fearing humans, grabbing small pet dogs right off of leashes, running the streets in broad daylight, etc.

We had a cat that was mauled by an animal 5 weeks ago, and I assumed it was a dog, but then the article came out in the paper and now I believe it may have been a coyote, as we live within the boundary of the area described in the article. Micheal, the cat, could not be saved (at least not without extreme monetary cost -- and even then, there was no guarantee he would live).

I have seen many coyotes in the far South part of the city, running along the roads, but none in our neighborhood (just this circumstantial evidence).

N C More
2004-Dec-28, 01:02 AM
Coyotes are one of 8 species of the genus Canis. Four of these are jackals of Europe, Africa and Asia. Other members of the genus include the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus), the Red Wolf (Canis rufus) and all the breeds of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). Coyotes can (and frequently do) mate with domestic dogs.

Coyotes are not "like" domestic dogs. Dogs have had thousands of years of selective breeding that has rendered them "domestic" animals. This breeding is why domestic dogs have such variation in size and appearance and why they have the temperment to coexist with humans. Coyotes, however, are very much wild animals despite living in close proximity to humans. Coyotes frequently hunt solo but they also frequently hunt in small groups (2 or 3) as well. Coyotes can be dangerous and aggressive, they are very intelligent. Although it is certainly fascinating to see dogs playing with them it's not really all that safe of an activity as they are "wild" animals in every respect and can "turn" in the blink of an eye.

aurora
2004-Dec-28, 05:15 AM
Coyotes frequently hunt solo but they also frequently hunt in small groups (2 or 3) as well. Coyotes can be dangerous and aggressive, they are very intelligent.

Once in Wyoming I saw a small group of coyotes working together chasing an antelope. An antelope can run 60 mph, much faster than any coyote, but the coyotes had spread out and were chasing the antelope around and around, herding it to tire it out.

That was only once though, usually I see coyotes by themselves.

Coyotes are much smaller than wolves, now that they have reintroduced wolves to Yellowstone many coyotes have been killed or driven away by the wolves. The coyotes in Yellowstone had their own way for many decades but no more.