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Andromeda321
2004-Dec-27, 06:34 PM
Ok, I saw this movie for the first time two days ago and odd as it sounds there's one thing that really annoyed me about the whole thing. In the movie George Bailey is a nice guy who helps people out by giving out loans so they can buy houses etc which is what bankers do. Despite this he's perpetually behind Potter who is an evil guy who prefers to sit on his money rather then invest it. I mean the excuse is he wants to keep getting rent money from his slums but he's still gotta get less income then George so why is he still ahead?
When I raised this point my sister started yelling at me to shut up already because that's not the point of the movie. But in all honesty it still annoys me a great deal! Anyone else notice this inconsistancy in the rules of capitalism or just me? :-?

Humots
2004-Dec-27, 10:17 PM
IIRC, there's a scene in the movie where Potter's accountant tells him that George is gaining fast and certain to pull ahead. The accountant then tells Potter to his face that he expects to be working for George in the not too distant future.

Possibly Potter had a huge head start, and George kept loaning money rather than enjoying it.

Candy
2004-Dec-27, 10:22 PM
I always remember this line.


Look, Daddy. Teacher says every time a bell rings, an angel gets his wings.

JonnyWishbone
2004-Dec-28, 04:10 AM
I like the movie (and the SNL skit in which Uncle Billy figures out who stole the money and everyone in Bedford Falls goes over to Potter's house to kick him to death), but Capra's original conception is pretty interesting. It's mentioned at length in the big Capra biography I've got on my shelf, so if anyone's interested in author et al., jusy yell and I'll get up and check.

Anyway, the original idea -- which Capra and the studio decided against for a variety of reasons -- was a movie in which there was no Mr. Potter because George Bailey in his alternate timeline was Mr. Potter -- he'd become the town's tyrant by making different choices. So there's no nemesis for George, no shadowy Old Man Potter -- just the vagaries of life causing problems when George is 'good'. And in the other world where George is bad (or at least overly self-interested), Bedford Falls is the world shown in the scenes in which George Bailey died young. The biography suggests that this early version was nixed because it removed the idea of black hats and white hats from the mix.

Cheers, Jon

The Bad Astronomer
2004-Dec-28, 05:26 AM
I'm surprised no one has pointed out that the head angels in the movie are actually Stephan's Quintet (http://www.noao.edu/image_gallery/html/im0120.html). 8)

tmosher
2004-Dec-28, 06:19 AM
I watched that movie once in it's entirety. I'll never watch it again.

Ok, so I'm a scrooge.

Bah Humbug!

Excuse me...it's just that something particularly nasty happened one Christmas to me and the family

jt-3d
2004-Dec-28, 06:24 AM
I'm surprised no one has pointed out that the head angels in the movie are actually Stephan's Quintet (http://www.noao.edu/image_gallery/html/im0120.html). 8)

Ha, yeah, I remember noticing that a year or two ago. Before that I'd never heard of Stephan's Quintet (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap001113.html).

Potter owns the bank but he also owns everything else in town while George only has the building and loan. Plus George has most of the money tied up in loans, hence his having to use his own money to bail out his company. While Potter would forclose on you if you didn't make your payments. Sadly, George Bailey would never catch up with Potter financially but is always ahead in the things that matter.

TheGalaxyTrio
2004-Dec-28, 09:26 AM
I watched that movie once in it's entirety. I'll never watch it again.

Ok, so I'm a scrooge.


Watch "A Christmas Story". I'm the biggest scrooge in the galaxy, but I dig that film. The great quest of little Ralphie for the Official Red Ryder Carbine-Action Two-Hundred-Shot Range Model Air Rifle!

Quote: "In the heat of battle my father wove a tapestry of obscenities that as far as we know is still hanging in space over Lake Michigan."

jfribrg
2004-Dec-29, 04:50 AM
I love both "It's a wonderful Life" and "A Christmas Story"

There was another thread that talked about how aweful that line is : "Teacher says.....". It was as if the viewer was not expected to remember what had Clarence said earlier about the bell, and wouldn't understand his "thanks for the wings" note. I was insulted. Also, George doesn't believe that he is in this alternate reality until he is out of it, but then doesn't believe he is back. Also, why do the bank examiners let George off. Just because someone else is willing to make up the discrepancy doesn't relieve their responsibility to investigate. Other than that, I like the story.

"A Christmas story" is one of my favorites. I don't know how many times I've used quotes from the movie: "I'll manage.....somehow", "Oh Fudge" (only I didn't say fudge), and "I triple dog dare you". I haven't seen it in years, but I always love watching it.

tmosher
2004-Dec-29, 07:30 AM
I watched that movie once in it's entirety. I'll never watch it again.

Ok, so I'm a scrooge.


Watch "A Christmas Story". I'm the biggest scrooge in the galaxy, but I dig that film. The great quest of little Ralphie for the Official Red Ryder Carbine-Action Two-Hundred-Shot Range Model Air Rifle!

Quote: "In the heat of battle my father wove a tapestry of obscenities that as far as we know is still hanging in space over Lake Michigan."

I liked "A Christmas Story".

What ever happened to the kid that played Ralphie?

Never mind, he turned into a producer...

Tom

toolazytotypemyname
2004-Dec-29, 05:36 PM
I like the take on throwing a lasso around the moon in Bruce Almighty.

Maksutov
2005-Jan-07, 10:54 AM
Since 2003 my favorite "holiday" movie is Bad Santa starring Billy Bob Thornton in a fine and sometimes intentionally realistic performance. I'd quote some of its funniest lines, but in the interest of remaining affiliated with the BABB, well... Anyway, here's a review by my favorite movie critic (CAUTION: just a smidgen of adult language, used accurately and humorously). (http://www.flickfilosopher.com/flickfilos/archive/2003/badsanta.shtml)

TriangleMan
2005-Jan-07, 12:15 PM
In the movie George Bailey is a nice guy who helps people out by giving out loans so they can buy houses etc which is what bankers do. Despite this he's perpetually behind Potter who is an evil guy who prefers to sit on his money rather then invest it. I mean the excuse is he wants to keep getting rent money from his slums but he's still gotta get less income then George so why is he still ahead?
Accounting question!! :D

Potter could well be receiving more income than Bailey, I don't think we know just how many buildings Potter rents out. (eg if Potter rents out 100 buildings at $100/month and Bailey has 40 loans paying $200/month Potter is still earning more then Bailey).

Potter has a poor strategy for handling his assets as he should be investing them. The buildings he rents will eventually fall in greater states of disrepair and he won't be able to collect as much rent.

Bailey's investment strategy also has its problems. It's good that he's loaning out the money, thereby earning I assume a high rate of interest, but if he has to "bail out the company" with his own money then he's spread his company's assets way too thin, which is not wise to do in banking and lending industries. It's a better strategy then Potter, probably why the accountant mentioned that one day he'll work for Bailey (if that scene was in the movie).

captain swoop
2005-Jan-07, 12:45 PM
My fave Xmas movie is still the Muppet Christmas Carol.

Plus I always watch at leat a 'Road' , a Marx Brothers and a Gene Kelly musical.

This year it was Morocco, Horse Feathers and On the Town.

gethen
2005-Jan-07, 03:08 PM
I always remember this line.


Look, Daddy. Teacher says every time a bell rings, an angel gets his wings.
[barf emoticon] Yeah, I remember that too.[/barf emoticon]
I always get to the end of that movie feeling a bit dissatisfied because Potter gets away with stealing the money and his flunky (the guy who pushes his wheelchair around) knows he has it, seems disturbed at the theft, and never says a word. I want Justice!!!!

Donnie B.
2005-Jan-07, 03:16 PM
I always remember this line.


Look, Daddy. Teacher says every time a bell rings, an angel gets his wings.
[barf emoticon] Yeah, I remember that too.[/barf emoticon]
I always get to the end of that movie feeling a bit dissatisfied because Potter gets away with stealing the money and his flunky (the guy who pushes his wheelchair around) knows he has it, seems disturbed at the theft, and never says a word. I want Justice!!!!
What, you never saw the Saturday Night Live skit with Dana Carvey in the Jimmy Stewart role? It shows the next ten minutes or so after IAWL ends... the minutes in which George realizes the very things you did, and leads a mob to Potter's office to beat the living hoo-haw out of him.

Candy
2005-Jan-07, 03:51 PM
What, you never saw the Saturday Night Live skit with Dana Carvey in the Jimmy Stewart role? It shows the next ten minutes or so after IAWL ends... the minutes in which George realizes the very things you did, and leads a mob to Potter's office to beat the living hoo-haw out of him.
I miss classic SNL. Remember the spoof from Citizen Cane? I think it was John Belushi, as Cane, whispering over and over, "Roast Beef on Rye". :lol:

Wally
2005-Jan-07, 03:57 PM
I was almost ready to give you crap Candy! I read the line "classical SNL" before seeing who had posted, and thought for sure it was going to be one of our more youthful members here, calling Dana Carvey's era "classical SNL"! :lol:

Sorry for almost jumping the gun! And I agree, nothing compares to the original NRFPTP's!! =D>

mike alexander
2005-Jan-07, 05:42 PM
Anyone who like A Christmas Story should git ahold of Jean Shepherd's story collections and read them (Two of the best are Wanda Hickey's Night of Golden Memories, and Other Disasters and In God We Trust, All Others Pay Cash). Story is an amalgamation of several other tales (like The Grandstand passion Play of Delbert and the Bumpus Hounds). I have always had such great sympathy for the Old Man, a working class Sysiphus.