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Candy
2004-Dec-28, 10:54 PM
House of Names (http://www.houseofnames.com/xq/ASP/sId./qx/honsurnamesearch.htm)

Here is some of my family's history. I'm more familiar with the Stair, then Peterson.


My mother was born a Cornell. I knew we are direct decendants of Ezra cornell (1807-1874) American businessman and Lizzie Andrew borden (1860-1927) American alleged murderess.

Origin Displayed: English

Origins Available: Scottish, English

Spelling variations include: Cornwall, Cornelle, Cornell, Cornwell, Cornewall, Cornal, Cornale, Cornevale, Carnwell, Carnewell, Carnville, Carnevale, Cornhall, Cornehall, Cornhale, Cornwale, Curnow (from native Cornish word) and many more.
First found in Devonshire where they held a family seat from very ancient times, long before the Norman Conquest in 1066.
Some of the first settlers of this name or some of its variants were: Richard Cornell who settled in Rhode Island in 1630; Thomas Cornell settled in Boston Mass. in 1630; George Cornell settled in South Carolina in 1716.

My father was born a Stair (English). His father was adopted away from the Peterson family, so I used the Peterson name.

Origin Displayed: Scottish

Origins Available: Scottish, Swedish

Spelling variations include: Peterson, Petersone, Petterson, Piterson and others.
First found in Aberdeenshire where they were seated from early times and their first records appeared on the census rolls taken by the ancient Kings of Scotland to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.
Some of the first settlers of this name or some of its variants were: Cornelius Peterson who settled in Maryland in 1674; Evor Peterson settled in Virginia in 1653; Henry Peterson settled in Virginia in 1622; Neale Peterson settled in Virginia in 1653.
This web site is interesting.

Who are you? 8-[

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2004-Dec-28, 11:33 PM
Part of my Family is Mentioned, specifically, The Bronstein Branch (http://www.houseofnames.com/coatofarms_details.asp?sId=&s=Bronstein&text2.x=0& text2.y=0).

However, I Question the Site's Veracity, as a More Reputable Company, already provided my Family, with its Heritable Crest ...

Ya' know, that, and Bronstein is Ukrainian!

Candy
2004-Dec-29, 03:12 AM
Part of my Family is Mentioned, specifically, The Bronstein Branch (http://www.houseofnames.com/coatofarms_details.asp?sId=&s=Bronstein&text2.x=0& text2.y=0).

However, I Question the Site's Veracity, as a More Reputable Company, already provided my Family, with its Heritable Crest ...

Ya' know, that, and Bronstein is Ukrainian!
So are you related to Lev Davidovich Bronstein (1879-1940) Russian original name of Leon Trotsky?

I posted the web site for fun. I found it very credible with the Cornell family. I don't know enough about my 'other' side. I know that my grandma said Peterson was Scandanavian. She never really elaborated on which Scandanavian country. :)

BAroxMysox
2004-Dec-29, 03:14 AM
I couldn't find mine or my grandparents names there :-?

Celestial Mechanic
2004-Dec-29, 05:40 AM
Likewise, I didn't find any of my Polish ancestral names there.

You know, I can't help feeling about these places the same as I do about the various so-called "star registries"--this is really something of a scam. These are companies willing to sell you something that neither they nor you have any right to--the names of the stars, which is under the purview of professional astronomers, and the use of heraldic symbols which really only belong to the direct male descendents (if any) of the original knight to receive the crest.

The star registry scammers give you an authentic looking parchment with coordinates of "your" star. The heraldry scammers give you a very generic history that really doesn't say much, in fact much of it is boiler-plate. If you don't believe me, go to House of Names and look up as many of your ancestral names as you can. It helps to be British or Irish, but there are some German surnames represented, and I found a few of these. What they had to say about the few names I found was mostly about the earliest immigrants with that name, which is largely irrelevant to me since my ancestors all arrived here between 1840 and 1885 or so.

Needless to say, a much better site to go to is www.familysearch.org , the genealogy site sponsored by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. I'm sure that other sites will be recommended as a result of this post.

Edited to get the comma out of the link.

Candy
2004-Dec-29, 06:12 AM
Needless to say, a much better site to go to is www.familysearch.org, the genealogy site sponsored by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. I'm sure that other sites will be recommended as a result of this post.

Your link doesn't work, but I fixed it. Here's a better place (http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/fhlcatalog/supermainframeset.asp?display=surnamesearch&column s=*,0,0) to start with the link you provided after surfing around.


A Cornell family history : from County Essex, England to Winneshiek County, Iowa

Thomas Cornell (b. ca. 1595 - d. ca. 1655) married Rebecca Briggs and immigrated in ca. 1638 from England to New England, U.S.A. Descendants and relatives lived in New England, Iowa, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Wisconsin and elsewhere.

As a matter of fact, I still have family in Essex to this day.

I love this kind of stuff. Additional web sites are welcome! :D

2004-Dec-29, 08:52 AM
It looks like my family name originates in England... :o :o :o :o


I'll pass on the ancient manuscripts too, I think?? :D :D :lol:

AstroSmurf
2004-Dec-29, 01:01 PM
I might add that most of the info on the -son names is utterly worthless, since this is a patronymic, not a surname in the modern sense. In Sweden, the shift from patronymics to hereditary surnames came as late as early 20th century in some places, and the situation is similar in most of Scandinavia. In Iceland, patronymics are still used this way.

E.g: My grandmother was born "Robertsson", since her father was named Robert. However, her mother had a different surname, and once she became a widow and moved to a place where surnames had become hereditary, all of them changed their names to "Rogersson" to avoid confusion - having a mother and her children have different surnames wasn't quite acceptable there.

Paul Mitchell
2004-Dec-29, 01:30 PM
My grandmother was born "Robertsson", since her father was named Robert.
Are you sure it wasn't "Robertsdottir" or similar (her being female)?

AstroSmurf
2004-Dec-29, 01:33 PM
My grandmother was born "Robertsson", since her father was named Robert.
Are you sure it wasn't "Robertsdottir" or similar (her being female)?

Pretty sure (would be "Robertsdotter" in Swedish). "-dotter" is used in medieval times, but it seems to have changed over the centuries. Language usages are seldom strictly logical...

Candy
2004-Dec-29, 01:50 PM
Origin of Surnames (http://www.searchforancestors.com/surnames/origin/)

Surnames were generally derived from one of four sources:

1) Patronymic (from the first name of father).
Examples:
Peters - son of Peter (English, German)
Peterson - son of Peter (Swedish)
Petersen - son of Peter (Danish)
O'Reilly - grandson of Reilly (Ireland)
Mc- /Mac- - son of (Scottish)
d'- / di- - son of (Italian)
-ez / -es - son of (Spanish / Portuguese)
-wicz - son of (Poland)
Fitz- - son of (Old English - generally associated with being an illegitimate)


2) Localities or places.
Examples:
KirkPatrick - Church (kirk) of St. Patrick
Cliff - steep hill
Fairholm - the fair island


3) Occupation or social status.
Examples:
Cooper - barrel maker
Wagner or Waggoner - wagon maker
Knight - knighthood conferred by the king


4) Nicknames describing person or personality.
Reid - red, ruddy complexion or red hair
Stout - Body size
Small - Body size
Armstrong - strong arms
Sharpe - sharp, smart

Fitz :o

Paul Mitchell
2004-Dec-29, 01:52 PM
My grandmother was born "Robertsson", since her father was named Robert.
Are you sure it wasn't "Robertsdottir" or similar (her being female)?

Pretty sure (would be "Robertsdotter" in Swedish). "-dotter" is used in medieval times, but it seems to have changed over the centuries. Language usages are seldom strictly logical...
I thought he said Icelandic...

Swift
2004-Dec-29, 01:53 PM
This is not a reflection on any of the sites or companies mentioned so far, I have no opinion if they are legit or not. This is just my own, funny experience.

Years ago my father received a piece of mail from one of these companies. They had traced our family name, Foise, back several centuries, and for a "modest" fee would send us a beautiful copy of our coat-of-arms. Well the family name is completely made up, it was up by my great-grandfather in the 19th century; it had been Feist and he changed it to sound less German (I'll spare you all the details). So the coat-of-arms was a complete hoax. [-X

It is much the same on my mother's side (Sacks), but for a different reason. It had been some long, Polish name, but was changed by the U.S. government on Ellis Island when they came over. :-?

Paul Mitchell
2004-Dec-29, 01:54 PM
According to House of Name my surname is Norman French and originates from Surrey (ignoring the French origin presumably) where I now live!

However I'm pretty sure that my name is Scottish in origin and is a "sept" of the McInnes clan.

Candy
2004-Dec-29, 02:03 PM
According to House of Name my surname is Norman French and originates from Surrey (ignoring the French origin presumably) where I now live!

However I'm pretty sure that my name is Scottish in origin and is a "sept" of the McInnes clan.

Origin of the Surname Mitchell (http://www.searchforancestors.com/surnames/origin/m/mitchell.php)


A corruption of Michael, or from the Saxon Muchel, big.


Source: An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names With an Essay on their Derivation and Import; Arthur, William, M.A.; New York, NY: Sheldon, Blake & CO., 1857. :-k

Wally
2004-Dec-29, 02:05 PM
Yeah, I kinda doubt the authenticity of the site in the OP. I have a bit of an unusual last name of Swedish background. The site listed what it says are other spellings for my name, and then proceeded to talk about people with names matching those other spellings.

Uhm. . . yeah. :roll:

AstroSmurf
2004-Dec-29, 02:08 PM
All this shows is that you can't simply find your ancestors by doing a search on the name. There may be completely unrelated families that use the same name. You need to do the footwork and trace the actual individuals to be able to say anything much at all.

Personally, I've only encountered genealogy through my parents, but from what I could tell, it rhymes with "wishful thinking" in many cases. Establishing any sort of confidence in the information starts becoming fiendishly difficult after just a few centuries; the only reason we can get that far back in Sweden is because of church records, but I'm boggled as to how this is done abroad. I suppose that's how these places make a living - when you have *nothing* to go on, this stuff starts looking better...

Candy
2004-Dec-29, 02:14 PM
Yeah, I kinda doubt the authenticity of the site in the OP. I have a bit of an unusual last name of Swedish background. The site listed what it says are other spellings for my name, and then proceeded to talk about people with names matching those other spellings.

Uhm. . . yeah. :roll: My family name, Cornell, matched both websites. I think it's the Coat of Arms part that's a bit whacked.

I like this one for origins (http://www.searchforancestors.com/surnames/origin/c/cornell.php). 8)

Origin of the Surname Cornell :

In the British it signifies a corner, a place shaped like a horn (from the Latin cornu). Corneille, in the French, signifies a crow.

Source: An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names With an Essay on their Derivation and Import; Arthur, William, M.A.; New York, NY: Sheldon, Blake & CO., 1857.

Bawheid
2004-Dec-29, 02:33 PM
However I'm pretty sure that my name is Scottish in origin and is a "sept" of the McInnes clan.

Lot of Mitchells up here, I'd go for Scots rather than Norman.

As for researching Scottish surnames, it all gets a bit sketchy once you get to the C19th. Too many islands where everyone is called McLeod or MacDonald. Too many variations of spelling, even within families. Once you are talking about emigrants to another country there is further corruption of spelling and a lot of tall tales about family origins.

Kaptain K
2004-Dec-29, 03:13 PM
The site had both of my maternal grandparent's surnames - Williams and Fair - said both were English (Duh!). Said my surname (Klemme) was from Saxony - WRONG! - it's Bavarian. Had no listing at all for my paternal grandmother's surname (Geebler).

BTW - The coat of arms they showed was nothing like the one I remember my father having framed on the wall of his den!

Mars
2004-Dec-29, 05:13 PM
House of Names (http://www.houseofnames.com/xq/ASP/sId./qx/honsurnamesearch.htm)

Here is some of my family's history. I'm more familiar with the Stair, then Peterson.


My mother was born a Cornell. I knew we are direct decendants of Ezra cornell (1807-1874) American businessman and Lizzie Andrew borden (1860-1927) American alleged murderess.

Origin Displayed: English

Origins Available: Scottish, English

Spelling variations include: Cornwall, Cornelle, Cornell, Cornwell, Cornewall, Cornal, Cornale, Cornevale, Carnwell, Carnewell, Carnville, Carnevale, Cornhall, Cornehall, Cornhale, Cornwale, Curnow (from native Cornish word) and many more.
First found in Devonshire where they held a family seat from very ancient times, long before the Norman Conquest in 1066.
Some of the first settlers of this name or some of its variants were: Richard Cornell who settled in Rhode Island in 1630; Thomas Cornell settled in Boston Mass. in 1630; George Cornell settled in South Carolina in 1716.

My father was born a Stair (English). His father was adopted away from the Peterson family, so I used the Peterson name.

Origin Displayed: Scottish

Origins Available: Scottish, Swedish

Spelling variations include: Peterson, Petersone, Petterson, Piterson and others.
First found in Aberdeenshire where they were seated from early times and their first records appeared on the census rolls taken by the ancient Kings of Scotland to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.
Some of the first settlers of this name or some of its variants were: Cornelius Peterson who settled in Maryland in 1674; Evor Peterson settled in Virginia in 1653; Henry Peterson settled in Virginia in 1622; Neale Peterson settled in Virginia in 1653.
This web site is interesting.

Who are you? 8-[

My mother said my family was related to Lizzie Borden.

Her last name was Waring.

Mars
2004-Dec-29, 05:18 PM
My last name Krollage is not found. I know it is German, and that it was the name of the house my family served. Twin brothers came for Germany on got the real last name Liebshick(sp) other Krollage at Ellis Island.

Candy
2004-Dec-29, 10:17 PM
My mother said my family was related to Lizzie Borden.

Her last name was Waring. Hey, we could be very distant cousins from the Cornell side way back from the US in the 1600's. :D

Lizzie would be my distant cousin, too.

I find this so interesting. This geneology doesn't seem to go back very far. I did find where my fraternal grandmother, Cartwright, can be traced as far back as the 1000's to England. What's up with all my English and Scottish roots? :D

Mars
2004-Dec-29, 10:38 PM
That is pretty cool.

kylenano
2004-Dec-29, 11:13 PM
Years ago I started tracing my family history, but got stuck. It's much easier now with online search engines than large dusty books! With www.familysearch.org (http://www.familysearch.org/) I think I've finally got enough info to request my great-great grandmother's birth certificate from Lambeth Town Hall.

Though there are mistakes - reading some of the original documents can be difficult. My great-grandmother was born in Lambeth, Surrey and one of the records said 'London, Sussex' which doesn't make sense. There are also some odd spellings of St Austell in Cornwall.

The 1881 census on the site is useful - I found my great grandfather attending a Congregational college in Bristol - I knew he was a theological student. But I wouldn't have found him in the census easily without a computer search.

I haven't traced the origins of another great grandfather who joined the army under a false name yet. Though isn't going from O'Neill to McNeill a bit obvious? Years ago I found a paper in the army records in the National Archive at Kew where he admitted to using the false name!

Paul Mitchell
2004-Dec-30, 02:53 PM
However I'm pretty sure that my name is Scottish in origin and is a "sept" of the McInnes clan.

Lot of Mitchells up here, I'd go for Scots rather than Norman.

As for researching Scottish surnames, it all gets a bit sketchy once you get to the C19th. Too many islands where everyone is called McLeod or MacDonald. Too many variations of spelling, even within families. Once you are talking about emigrants to another country there is further corruption of spelling and a lot of tall tales about family origins.
My paternal grandfather definitely went to stay with family in Aberdeen after his mother died, which was just before 1910 I think. His parents lived in London at the time. Must do some more digging :D

Bawheid
2004-Dec-30, 04:17 PM
If you are looking for anything Scottish, try General Registers for Scotland (http://www.gro-scotland.gov.uk/famrec/index.html), if that doesn't work, PM me.

jamestox
2004-Dec-30, 04:21 PM
heh....I've seen so many versions of "my" family device that I came to the rapid realization that, in order to establish which is the "right" one, I'd need to do EXTENSIVE genealogical research - and I have precious few true records to start with.

:(

Candy
2004-Dec-30, 04:31 PM
I have precious few true records to start with.

:(
http://www.click-smilies.de/sammlung0304/aktion/action-smiley-032.gif

Doodler
2004-Dec-30, 04:50 PM
About ten years ago, a relative of mine actually assembled a family tree for her immediate family (she is my grandfather's sister) that ran back to 1600, and while my surname is Buchanan, my bloodline is primarily Romanian (from my maternal grandmother, who's got the most "pure" bloodline of my four grandparents). This site is interesting, though I've seen more detailed analysis of the Buchanan family in the past, but when people ask me what I am, I answer, very honestly, that I'm a mutt.

Romanian, French Creole, Cherokee, Delaware (native American), English, a touch of Scottish (had to be a highlander in there somewhere), and African American (not 100% sure here, the rumor floats whenever geneology comes up. We believe this might be tied in with the Creole branch of the family).