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selvaarchi
2014-Jul-13, 02:58 PM
One of the biggest obstacles to space exploration is budgets and the assets we can use. The drop on total budgets in 2013 was seen as a start of belt tightening. This has now been dispelled by the new report showing increasing spending in 2014 and a more positive outlook.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Government_Funding_for_Space_on_the_Road_to_Recove ry_999.html


Following a critical period of cyclical low funding which concluded in a budget decrease in 2013 worldwide, moderate growth is expected moving forward which should bring world spending to $82 billion by 2023

India just announced a budget increase of 6.5% for their space program. 2 things that stand out to me are 1) 1.8 billion rupees for development of the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mark 3, which will be capable of launching satellites weighing 4 metric tons 2) 1.5 billion rupees is provided for work on a new engine fueled by liquid oxygen and kerosene. Both these developments will play a key role in their manned space ambitions.

http://spacenews.com/article/civil-space/41216indian-space-budget-slated-to-rise-by-65-percent


India’s financial year begins April 1, but the newly elected government only came to power in May. The allocation represents a 6.5 percent increase from the previous year, Deviprasad Karnik, a spokesman for the Indian Space Research Organisation, said.

selvaarchi
2014-Jul-19, 10:56 PM
New report on the Indian budget says it is a 50% increase as last years budget was reduced.

http://www.outlookindia.com/news/article/At-Rs-6000-Cr-Modi-Govt-Grants-50-Jump-in-ISRO-Budget/849170


In a major boost for India's space programme, the Narendra Modi government has earmarked Rs 6,000 crore for ISRO in its maiden budget, which is a whopping 50 per cent jump in the agency's funding over last year.

In 2013-14, although the Department of Space was initially given Rs 5,615 crore, that allocation was later revised to Rs 4,000 crore.

selvaarchi
2014-Jul-20, 03:22 AM
One of the reasons NASA struggles with it's budget every year is because there has been a continuing mismatch between the real levels of NASA’s budget and the public’s perception of it.

http://www.americaspace.com/?p=64386


In a study published in the Space Policy journal in 2003, former NASA Chief Historian Dr. Roger Launius observed that “in 1997, the average estimate of NASA’s share of the federal budget by those polled, was 20 percent. Had this been true, NASA’s budget in 1997 would have been $328 billion. If NASA had that amount of money, it would have been able to send humans to Mars. It seems obvious that most Americans have little conception, of the amount of money available to NASA.” This false perception doesn’t seem to have changed throughout the years. A survey made in early 2013 by the non-profit organisation Explore Mars Inc. found that 95 percent of Americans believe that NASA’s budget is somewhere between 0.75-4.11 percent of the federal budget, indicating that many people think that NASA is actually receiving today the same amount of money that it did during the Apollo program in the 1960s. It’s worthy of note that, according to the same survey, when informed about the actual percentage of NASA’s budget, 75 percent of respondents were in favor of doubling it to 1 percent in order to fund a human mission to Mars.

NEOWatcher
2014-Jul-21, 12:39 PM
New report on the Indian budget says it is a 50% increase as last years budget was reduced.

While Rs 378.76 crore has been extended for the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO)'s GSLV Mk-III project

Ok, now I'm confused. The GSLV Thread (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php?152093-India-s-new-launch-vehicles-GSLV-Series&p=2227892#post2227892) said 171. That's less than half of this number.

NEOWatcher
2014-Jul-21, 01:12 PM
One of the reasons NASA struggles with it's budget every year is because there has been a continuing mismatch between the real levels of NASA’s budget and the public’s perception of it.
But; how does that compare to other countries?

Rattling off billions of dollars and comparing apples to oranges with military and social programs mean nothing. I'd like to know from those same surveys if those people really know what the US is spending on the military or social security. Anecdotally, my experience is that they don't view those budgets as big.

Then, how does that compare to a ratio of national budget to other countries? Guess what? Pretty close.
According to this chart (http://brainoids.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/intlpctbud.png) from this article (http://brainoids.wordpress.com/2011/04/06/international-space-spending/), we rank 3rd and and the percentage is relatively stable.

So; are Americans unique in this problem? I doubt it.

selvaarchi
2014-Sep-19, 11:41 AM
NASA's inspector general reported Thursday that the International Space Station will likely cost more to operate over the next decade than officials expect. It seem to imply that the cost of the commercial crew might not be the savings expected. This could be due to development cost being rolled into the flight cost.

http://spaceflightnow.com/news/n1409/18issoig/#.VBwH4VfRV1o


One reason costs are expected to increase is the expense of purchasing rides for astronauts on U.S. commercial crew capsules, which could cost more than the payments NASA is sending to Russia for seats on Soyuz spacecraft, the report said.

"NASA officials expect higher crew and cargo transportation costs to be the main driver of future increases in the cost of the ISS program," the report said, adding the space station's projected transportation costs are "unrealistic."

NEOWatcher
2014-Sep-19, 12:32 PM
It seem to imply that the cost of the commercial crew might not be the savings expected.
That's the keyword there. Even he doesn't know. It depends on if they can separate flight costs from the development costs.


NASA has not released a breakdown of the costs in each contract, so it is not clear how much of the money will go toward spacecraft development efforts, test flights, or operational missions, making it impossible -- at least so far -- to directly compare the price of a ride on a Boeing or SpaceX capsule with a Soyuz seat.

He also goes on to say that he doesn't know what the seat cost will be. Naturally a crew capsule is more expensive than a cargo capsule. But; it would have to be at least 50% more expensive before it's more than our current contract.

Besides, it's probably worth an extra cost politically. With all the issues lately, it's bringing domestic capability back. We don't know if foreign (Russian right now) seats will be more expensive because of political issues.

And; by choosing two suppliers, they are keeping some of the competitive advantages there.

It's definitely cheaper than anything NASA can do. Imagine Ares-1, or Orion doing the job.

selvaarchi
2014-Sep-19, 01:49 PM
That's the keyword there. Even he doesn't know. It depends on if they can separate flight costs from the development costs.



He also goes on to say that he doesn't know what the seat cost will be. Naturally a crew capsule is more expensive than a cargo capsule. But; it would have to be at least 50% more expensive before it's more than our current contract.

Besides, it's probably worth an extra cost politically. With all the issues lately, it's bringing domestic capability back. We don't know if foreign (Russian right now) seats will be more expensive because of political issues.

And; by choosing two suppliers, they are keeping some of the competitive advantages there.

It's definitely cheaper than anything NASA can do. Imagine Ares-1, or Orion doing the job.

My worry will be, if cost does not come down then the extension of the ISS to 2024 will be at risk. 25% of that cost is at the moment paid by US partners and even if one of them drops off it will increase the cost to the rest (so far none of the countries have agreed to the extension to my knowledge).

NEOWatcher
2014-Sep-19, 02:55 PM
My worry will be, if cost does not come down then the extension of the ISS to 2024 will be at risk. 25% of that cost is at the moment paid by US partners and even if one of them drops off it will increase the cost to the rest (so far none of the countries have agreed to the extension to my knowledge).
That's always at risk anyway. We already talked about the Russians not going along with the extension, and that's a major part of that 25%.

There's 12 seats going up each year. Even if we allocate only 3 of the 4 seats to non-tourists, and keep it at 4 flights per year, it's not going to be as big of an impact.

Let's say the cost of crewed dragon is even 2 times the cargo version...
That means we are (175 * 2) - 283 per mission above the Russian cost, or an annual increase of $268M. That's between 6%-9% of the $3B to $4B. A nice big dent, but small enough to convince the purseholders to continue given the political issues.

If we can recoup the cost of that extra seat per launch from a tourist, even that double cost is going to cheaper than the Russians by $82M per year.

NEOWatcher
2014-Sep-19, 05:18 PM
Fraser had this story today in UT and linked the actual document (http://oig.nasa.gov/audits/reports/FY14/IG-14-031.pdf).
It's not so much the commercial crew, but the commercial cargo. The potential to lose international partners with their funding and transportation services of the ESA's ATV and JAXA's HTV.
Dragon doesn't have the same capabilities and would need money to upgrade.

The other big issue is aging structure. There is no current heavy lift for certain components that may need replacing.

Commercial crew is a blip in the story because they don't have any numbers for it.

Your story is another example of trying to tie current events to a story.

Van Rijn
2014-Sep-19, 05:26 PM
There's an article at NASA Watch on issues and costs extending the ISS to 2024 described in an OIG report:

http://nasawatch.com/archives/2014/09/oig-report-on-e.html

One problem is that the solar panels are degrading faster than expected. Some of the comments are interesting. One that I think has a lot of merit is that they may rent Bigelow space station services instead. It's likely most of Bigelow's customers will be governments and businesses wanting to do microgravity research, so why not NASA?

Van Rijn
2014-Sep-19, 05:33 PM
Fraser had this story today in UT and linked the actual document (http://oig.nasa.gov/audits/reports/FY14/IG-14-031.pdf).

And that's the OIG report. Incidentally, they are going to test a small Bigelow module at the ISS.

selvaarchi
2014-Sep-20, 04:58 AM
Commercial crew is a blip in the story because they don't have any numbers for it.

Your story is another example of trying to tie current events to a story.

This at least explains how they got the award amount. Surprised they cost the flights at the same price the Russians are charging.

http://spacenews.com/article/civil-space/41924nasa-commercial-crew-awards-leave-unanswered-questions


However, a Sept. 18 report by the NASA Office of Inspector General on the ISS program noted that the agency has assumed a per-seat price for commercial crew missions of $70.7 million, the same as it will pay for a Soyuz seat in 2016. Twelve flights with four astronauts per flight results in a total transportation cost of nearly $3.4 billion. That, coupled with the commercial crew development costs in the budget proposal, would be consistent with the $6.8 billion combined value of the CCtCap contracts.

Van Rijn
2014-Sep-20, 08:06 AM
This at least explains how they got the award amount. Surprised they cost the flights at the same price the Russians are charging.


NASA was just using it as a comparison figure. Any way you slice it, Boeing is still charging a lot more than SpaceX.

selvaarchi
2014-Sep-20, 02:37 PM
NASA was just using it as a comparison figure. Any way you slice it, Boeing is still charging a lot more than SpaceX.

Another reason I was surprised Boeing got the lion share of the award. If done commercially then the cheaper option should get the lion share and the other enough to encourage it to do better in costs for the next round of awards.

NEOWatcher
2014-Sep-22, 11:58 AM
Another reason I was surprised Boeing got the lion share of the award. If done commercially then the cheaper option should get the lion share and the other enough to encourage it to do better in costs for the next round of awards.
Read your own article. The awards are consistent with what the companies stated in their proposals.

lpetrich
2014-Sep-25, 11:29 AM
One problem is that the solar panels are degrading faster than expected.
How difficult would it be to send up replacements without the Space Shuttle?

docmordrid
2014-Sep-27, 11:04 PM
How difficult would it be to send up replacements without the Space Shuttle?

Each array wing consists of 2 folded solar "blankets" with a supporting post between. Compacted each is .51 x 4.57 meters, and there are 8. (pic below)

The standard 14 m3 Dragon Trunk is too short, but SpaceX has discussed an extended trunk of 34 m3 (see below). One scene in the Dragon V2 video seemed to also show a "Long Trunk" (also below)

With the ISS CRS Round 2 Request For Proposals now in play an unpressurized cargo capability long enough to carry a pair each trip may not be out of line. Of the known competitors Dragon's path seems the shortest.

ISTM once you get them up there it's a matter of removing and stowing the old ones (Canadarm2) and installing new ones as done previously. Likely a Dragon V1 since they'll be flying in parallel with V2 for a while and it's lighter.

If, that is, they re-fold and can be placed in a disposable carrier like the Dragon's Trunk.

Solar blankets
http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/14/09/27/a2bba49ce312f8ec5c026a9a45cdb14a.jpg

Original Extended Trunk concept
http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/14/09/27/8167520b2f4ff5a7cc6e02547c386448.jpg

Dragon V2 Extended?
http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/14/09/27/91633c1901de3140e6fdc77a186c4b62.jpg

NEOWatcher
2014-Sep-29, 01:23 PM
Each array wing consists of 2 folded solar "blankets" with a supporting post between. Compacted each is .51 x 4.57 meters, and there are 8. (pic below)
But; isn't the third dimension 12 meters?

Even if the array can be folded in another direction, that's 28 m^3. Volume-wise, that would fit into the extended trunk, but shape-wise, I doubt there would be enough room. (that whole square peg in a round hole idea).

Would these things need to be fitted on a launch with cargo?
My gut says that it would probably be easier to design a fairing to hold them in their current folded configuration than to devise a new way to fold them to stuff in a bigger trunk.

selvaarchi
2014-Oct-01, 04:59 AM
US partners in no hurry on deciding on extension of operations of ISS to 2024.

http://spacenews.com/article/civil-space/42035space-station-partners-in-no-rush-to-decide-on-extension


In a “Heads of Agencies” panel session that kicked off the 65th International Astronautical Congress here, and a press conference that followed, the leaders of the Canadian Space Agency, European Space Agency, and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency said they had near-term priorities to address first, including maximizing the current use of the ISS, before considering the extension proposed by the United States earlier this year.

NEOWatcher
2014-Oct-01, 12:11 PM
US partners in no hurry on deciding on extension of operations of ISS to 2024.
Political and international commitments take time. Especially when the timing of elections in all countries are involved.

cjameshuff
2014-Oct-01, 01:38 PM
My gut says that it would probably be easier to design a fairing to hold them in their current folded configuration than to devise a new way to fold them to stuff in a bigger trunk.

That'd be considerably more efficient, but a Falcon alone can only deliver a bunch of solar panels to a particular orbit, it can't bring them to rendezvous with the ISS. That requires some sort of carrier vehicle or tug.

I've been wondering if their planned reusable second stage might carry berthing/docking equipment and enough hypergolic propellant for some orbital maneuvering apart from the de-orbit burn.

NEOWatcher
2014-Oct-01, 02:23 PM
That'd be considerably more efficient, but a Falcon alone can only deliver a bunch of solar panels to a particular orbit, it can't bring them to rendezvous with the ISS. That requires some sort of carrier vehicle or tug.
Probably need to do it in conjunction with another launch, but then again, what do we have that can actually latch on and act as a tug?

One thing is for certain. Current hardware won't do it.

cjameshuff
2014-Oct-01, 03:52 PM
Probably need to do it in conjunction with another launch, but then again, what do we have that can actually latch on and act as a tug?

One thing is for certain. Current hardware won't do it.

...the Dragon is a carrier vehicle capable of delivering payloads to the ISS. That's current hardware and it only requires a single launch. It's just a bit inefficient if all you're doing is delivering bulky unpressurized cargo.

I'm don't know where the two launch requirement is coming from. A reusable second stage may be able to do it in a single launch with whatever fits in the fairing, possibly with more payload. Or they could use a stripped down platform with little more than propulsion, avionics, and a docking adaptor. Multiple launches would only be needed if you needed every single kg of lift capacity for the payload or if there was insufficient volume even for a small propulsion/docking module.

NEOWatcher
2014-Oct-01, 05:29 PM
...the Dragon is a carrier vehicle capable of delivering payloads to the ISS. That's current hardware and it only requires a single launch. It's just a bit inefficient if all you're doing is delivering bulky unpressurized cargo.
It's not capable in this application. How can you fit a 12 meter object in the current hardware?


I'm don't know where the two launch requirement is coming from.
Who said requirement? You're putting words in my mouth. What do the words "probably" and "then again" mean to you?
It's just one idea I pondered about. Building a fairing, or extended trunk or whatever is needed while still mounting Dragon and its adaptors to the top of it might be more trouble and/or cost than just launching it in a simple fairing and then rendezvous.


A reusable second stage may be able to do it in a single launch with whatever fits in the fairing, possibly with more payload. Or they could use a stripped down platform with little more than propulsion, avionics, and a docking adaptor.
"may", "possibly", "could". That's my point. How much needs to be done to the current hardware to get the options done, and which is the best way to do it. It's an unknown at this point.


Multiple launches would only be needed if you needed every single kg of lift capacity for the payload or if there was insufficient volume even for a small propulsion/docking module.
That's what I'm talking about... Volume and configuration.

selvaarchi
2014-Oct-04, 06:52 AM
The article is about a debate on "why bother with space exploration?" but within it, there is information on how much UK spends on space.

http://www.space-travel.com/reports/To_boldly_go_what_is_the_point_of_space_exploratio n_999.html


Ashley Dale, said: "Last year, the UK government invested Pounds 267 million in space activities, about 0.03 per cent of government spending. This was alongside approximately Pounds 900 million spent on the upkeep of the Trident nuclear missile system through the Ministry of Defence and about Pounds 200 million towards gastric band surgery, treatment, and recovery through the NHS.

NEOWatcher
2014-Oct-06, 01:24 PM
I've never been a fan of comparing non-scientific things with space budgets (like military or health) as above because they suit completely different needs.
But; as a % of national budget, they do have a point.


"Does it invest enough in space to direct these evidently lucrative activities along the path that fits long-term economic development best? Compared to other developed nations, this might not seem to be the case."
According to the chart I provided in Post #5, UK sits #18 out of 19 for % of budget on civil space programs. Only behind Israel.

selvaarchi
2014-Oct-17, 12:56 AM
Again another article that is not on budgets but has figures on NASA's budget compared to what others are spending on space activities. It must be noted that the US budget for space activities is a lot more then NASA - you have the defense and commercial to add to that.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/andrewcave/2014/10/15/to-boldly-go-how-a-british-business-school-would-change-nasa/


States Heracleous: “Externally, space technology is no longer a monopoly. US and global stakeholders expect more than blue-sky scientific advances from NASA, given its $18bn budget; such as technologies that can improve life for humanity and to help address fundamental world challenges such as global warming.”

NASA’s challenges are about more than simply technology. The emergence of China and other nations into what used to be called the space race, mean that NASA only accounted for 6 per cent of the $290bn global expenditure on space activities in 2012, according to the Space Federation.

The organisation’s state funding has fallen from 4.5pc of the US federal budget in 1969 to 0.5 per cent today (2 per cent in real dollars) and internally its once all-beating culture is coming under strain.

NEOWatcher
2014-Oct-17, 12:06 PM
Again another article that is not on budgets but has figures on NASA's budget compared to what others are spending on space activities.
This article is what I call "strategically placed statistics".
While some of the numbers are relevant to the authors opinion, some are just thrown in to make it look bad. Yes; NASA has problems. But not in all the ways he's using to argue it.

He complains that NASA is not doing enough for global warming. Most of NASA's Earth research is directly related to Earth climate modeling. If he thinks they should be doing something about climate mitigation technology, he's wrong. That's the job of NOAA.

Like you said. There's a lot more to global expenditures than a civilian publicly funded agency. So the comparison is not valid.
Look at the %of national budget that I provided in post 5 (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php?152275-Space-budgets-and-assets&p=2228123#post2228123), look at the total space agency budgets (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_government_space_agencies#Budgets) around the world. It's nowhere near the 290B figure when you isolate civilian agencies.

ETA:
The other issue I have is that a lot of people compare the budget to the Apollo Days.
With Nixon, that all ended, and the NASA budget has been relatively stable since then.
Take numbers after 1974 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budget_of_NASA#Annual_budget.2C_1958-2015) and we get:
- A steady drop of percentage of the national budget by about half.
- A steady increase in budget for inflation adjusted dollars.
The ISS construction days did see an increase in-between.

So; is NASA's budget going down or going up? It depends on how you crunch the numbers.

selvaarchi
2014-Oct-25, 02:54 PM
OECD Takes Look at Quarter Trillion Dollar Global Space Industry

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2014/10/25/oecd-takes-quarter-trillion-dollar-global-space-industry/#more-53759


Although OECD countries accounted for the largest space budgets globally in 2013 (USD 52 billion, using purchasing power parities or PPPs), an increasing part of global space activities takes place outside of the OECD, particularly in Brazil, the Russian Federation, India and China (around USD 23.9 billion PPPs).

The space economy represented some USD 256.2 billion in revenues in 2013, divided between the space manufacturing supply chain (33%), satellite operators (8.4%) and consumer services (58%), including actors who rely on some satellite capacity for part of their revenues, such as direct‑to‑home satellite television services providers.

selvaarchi
2014-Nov-29, 12:39 PM
Italy’s Economic Problems Punch Holes in ESA’s Budget

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2014/11/28/italys-economic-problems-punch-holes-esas-budget/


Galle said the 200 million-euro cash injection was also intended to finance continued work on Italy’s second-generation Cosmo-SkyMed radar Earth observation system, which Thales Alenia Space is building.

“Our information is that this money will not be available,” Galle said. “These funds were really mandatory for Italy to fund these programs, of which Cosmo-SkyMed and Vega are the most important for Italy. So now there is really a question mark over Italy and its contribution.”


In a Nov. 24 briefing with SpaceNews staff writer Peter B. de Selding and others, Italian Space Agency President Roberto Battiston said the Thales concerns were legitimate, but overblown. He outlined Italy’s position going into the ministerial conference, and the status of Cosmo-SkyMed.

http://www.spacenews.com/article/features/42669profile-roberto-battiston-president-italian-space-agency


Industry’s concern is that you did not win approval for a budget supplement of 200 million euros per year for three years. Is this the case?

This statement is a bit imprecise. The amendment was mainly successful and foresees the funds for the ministerial for the coming six years. The 200 million per year was for four major activities: three to be dealt with by ESA — launchers, the space station and ExoMars. Two others are the second-generation Cosmo-SkyMed and a new strategic plan for small high-technology satellites.

The amendment succeeded for the ESA ministerial elements — the space station, ExoMars and launchers. This has been passed by the government’s finance committee and is part of the package that is now on the floor of the parliament. It will take a few weeks more to pass, but this is an important achievement.

selvaarchi
2014-Dec-04, 01:12 PM
NASA's 2015 budget hits rough waters.

http://www.spacenews.com/article/civil-space/42823rep-culberson-drops-in-to-pledge-planetary-science-support


Although the continuing resolution that has been funding the government since October is set to expire Dec. 11, the fate of the 2015 federal budget remained unclear as the Planetary Society made its latest Capitol Hill pitch Dec. 2.

House Republicans are mulling a so-called “cromnibus” (a combination of continuing resolution and omnibus) that would fund most of the federal government, including NASA, through September. If the crominubs proves unpalatable — as it may for reasons unrelated to space — Congress may whip up another short-term continuing resolution that would freeze federal spending at 2014 levels to avoid a government shutdown.

A House aide who attended the Planetary Society event allowed that, should a partial omnibus prove feasible, the $100 million Culberson wrangled for Europa would make a tempting target in conference negotiations between the House and the Senate.

Even in the House, which ultimately approved the $100 million, Wolf had to shoo away proposed amendments that would have steered all but $15 million of that amount out of NASA.

A Senate aide who attended the Dec. 2 event said appropriations staff on both sides of the Hill have “touched gloves” in preparation for conference negotiations, but that no substantial work has been done on compromise Commerce, Justice, Science language that could be folded into a partial omnibus.

NEOWatcher
2014-Dec-04, 03:03 PM
NASA's 2015 budget hits rough waters.

http://www.spacenews.com/article/civil-space/42823rep-culberson-drops-in-to-pledge-planetary-science-support
Not really. It's funding for one mission that isn't even on the books yet.
It would be a shame if they can't get a Europa mission up and running, but it doesn't affect current NASA plans.

publiusr
2014-Dec-06, 07:07 PM
Europa isn't going anywhere. Patience.

selvaarchi
2014-Dec-09, 03:14 PM
Not really. It's funding for one mission that isn't even on the books yet.
It would be a shame if they can't get a Europa mission up and running, but it doesn't affect current NASA plans.

Not if this report turns out to be true. Commercial Crew Funding is also at risk.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2014/12/08/space-access-society-update-2/#more-54123


The current Federal Fiscal Year 2015 (underway since October 1st) is the first of three critical funding years leading to first CCtCap flights in 2017. FY’15 at that point seemed unlikely to see any significant Commercial Crew increase over the roughly $800 million Congress had planned before election politics last summer shut down the normal FY’15 appropriations-bill process.

Given $800 million for FY’15, our ballpark estimate of CCtCap funding needs (with the selected contractors) for FY’16 and FY’17 was on the (very) rough order of $1.3 billion a year. (NASA has not yet released any detail on how the two CCtCap contracts break down within the overall totals given. To get ballpark numbers we assumed half of each contract is for development, half for the six operational flights included in the totals.)

Put another way, between now and next October Congress will very likely need to approve an increase of 50% or more to fully fund the current Commercial Crew program. In the ongoing tight funding climate, this could take some seriously heavy lifting.

selvaarchi
2014-Dec-10, 03:54 PM
Good news for NASA. They will get more than a half a billion dollars above the Obama administration’s original request for 2015.

http://www.spacenews.com/article/civil-space/42909nasa-receives-18-billion-in-omnibus-spending-bill


The appropriations bill, which funds NASA and most of the rest of the federal government for the remainder of the fiscal year, gives the agency $17.99 billion for fiscal year 2015, including increases for several major exploration and science programs. That total is $530 million above the administration’s request of $17.46 billion for the agency, and about $100 million above separate House and Senate appropriations bills considered earlier this year.

Two major elements of NASA’s exploration strategy won funding boosts in the final bill. The Space Launch System heavy-lift rocket will receive $1.7 billion, an increase of $320 million over the administration’s request. The Orion spacecraft will get $1.194 billion, an increase of $141.2 million over the request.

Jim
2014-Dec-11, 02:14 PM
Not that good. Congress is willing to fund the Space Launch System and Orion, but they neglected to fund “Space Technology Development,” which got a 15 percent cut.

“Space Technology Development” includes "better propulsion systems, radiation protection, new landers, power systems, robust rovers, life support systems, and all kinds of advanced technologies to get to and survive on Mars."

So, we can get people into space, but they won't be able to go anywhere or do very much. (I thought Elon Musk was working on that?)

http://blog.chron.com/sciguy/2014/12/congress-cuts-the-one-area-of-nasas-budget-really-needed-to-go-to-mars/

publiusr
2014-Dec-13, 06:39 PM
Then too, look at it this way.

First you have to buy the truck to tow your buggy to the dunes.
The LV is the truck, and the rest is the dune buggy. First things first.

And a 15% cut now isn't going to stop an eventual visit to Mars.

The harping of the alt.spacers just might--they can get pretty shrill.

publiusr
2014-Dec-13, 08:18 PM
The hit to the ruble is really hurting the Russians, who want to fly this
http://www.russianspaceweb.com/energia5kv.html
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=36321.0

selvaarchi
2014-Dec-15, 11:07 AM
A trio of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) human exploration programs will cost over $21 billion, the US Government Accountability Office (GAO) has told Sputnik.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Estimated_Cost_of_3_NASA_Exploration_Programs_to_E xceed_21_Billion_GAO_999.html


The three human exploration programs include the Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle, the Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO), and the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (Orion).

"NASA estimates SLS will cost 9.7 billion through the first flight test in 2018. NASA estimates GDSO will cost 2.8 billion for the same time period. NASA does not yet have official estimates for Orion, but it had a preliminary estimate of 8.5 billion to 10.3 billion to the second flight test," GAO's acting director of the acquisition and sourcing management team, Cristina T. Chaplain, told Sputnik Thursday.

Chaplain stressed that these estimates "only reflect the first stages of development" but added that SLS alone is 9 percent of the annual budget for NASA.

According to Chaplain, NASA has recently committed to a November 2018 launch date for GSDO and SLS with a 70 percent confidence level in that date. NASA has not yet committed to a date for Orion. Delays in meeting launch deadlines are due to funding shortfalls, Chaplain explained.

The GAO representative went on to say that NASA has not made official plans for all three programs, following their scheduled second test flights.

"There are no official missions set beyond the second test flight for all three systems. NASA has a goal of going to Mars in its strategic plan, but no missions or roadmaps have been set," she explained, adding that right now "NASA is focused on building a capability that can undertake a range of future missions that take humans beyond low earth orbit".

selvaarchi
2014-Dec-15, 11:30 AM
The UK Space Agency is making an extra investment of over 200 million pounds in Europe's space programme. This will among other things give it overall leadership of the Mars rover module and for the first time, the Union Jack will be flying on the International Space Station as a full partner.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/200_million_pound_investment_is_rocket_fuel_for_UK _space_industry_999.html


From Mars rovers to the development of the next generation telecoms satellites, the direction of Britain's investment in European space projects was decided earlier this month (02 December 2014) as the Minister for Universities, Science and Cities Greg Clark finalised negotiations for the UK at the European Space Agency's (ESA) Ministerial Council in Luxembourg.

The outcome of the Ministerial negotiations will strengthen the UK role in a number of areas, including telecommunications and microgravity research. The UK space industry forecasts that the new package of investment will enable it to pursue new markets worth over 1.5 billion. This will support the UK's ambition to grow a 30 billion space industry by 2030.

Garrison
2014-Dec-15, 01:04 PM
And next years NASA budget has been set:

http://spaceflightnow.com/2014/12/14/nasa-gets-budget-hike-in-spending-bill-passed-by-congress/

More for Orion and SLS but also extra cash for Planetary Science and SOFIA. Commercial Crew gets $805 million rather than the $848 million requested but even that is an improvement over previous years:

2011: $321 million appropriated vs. $500 million requested
2012: $397 million appropriated vs. $850 million requested
2013: $525 million appropriated vs. $830 million requested
2014: $696 million appropriated vs. $821 million requested
2015: $805 million appropriated vs. $848 million requested

NEOWatcher
2014-Dec-15, 03:12 PM
... the Union Jack will be flying on the International Space Station as a full partner.
Actually, it's the second time, and has already gone up. It was taken down in 2010. but last year, UK increased their involvement and Major Peake (http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2013/05/uks-major-peake-delighted-by-historic-iss-assignment/) took the flag back up.

Between this, and involvement in Orion, it's a small shift in UK from purely robotic ambitions to one of sharing with human spaceflight.

Garrison
2014-Dec-15, 11:41 PM
Actually, it's the second time, and has already gone up. It was taken down in 2010. but last year, UK increased their involvement and Major Peake (http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2013/05/uks-major-peake-delighted-by-historic-iss-assignment/) took the flag back up.

Between this, and involvement in Orion, it's a small shift in UK from purely robotic ambitions to one of sharing with human spaceflight.

Of course the motivation is mainly economic, being involved with the human spaceflight program let UK companies bid on contracts they would otherwise be barred from.

NEOWatcher
2014-Dec-16, 12:28 AM
Of course the motivation is mainly economic, being involved with the human spaceflight program let UK companies bid on contracts they would otherwise be barred from.
Of course. In fact, the article states that in a way.

Human spaceflight IS, in a large part, an economic and technology program with a wrapping of dreams.

selvaarchi
2014-Dec-18, 12:22 AM
Is there any truth in this report from the Chinese press?

http://www.chinatopix.com/articles/28435/20141217/why-did-nasa-finish-a-349-million-rocket-tower-only-to-close-it-down.htm


Why did NASA Finish a $349 Million Rocket Tower only to Close it Down?

A US$349 million rocket tower once part of NASA's Constellation rocket program has been canceled but strangely, construction still continued.

The Mississippi Tower, also called the John C. Stennis Space Center, was designed to test rocket motors in real life conditions. It was to have tested the Aries 1 and 5 boosters and the J-2X engine that were all later canceled.

The booster equipment was designed during the Bush Administration. The project was later scrapped by President Obama in 2010.

The primary purpose of the tower is to test rocket engines inside a chamber designed to produce similar space conditions. The Space Launch System, which is the successor to the Orion mission, did not require these tests.

selvaarchi
2014-Dec-18, 02:43 PM
Looks like they picked it up from the Washington Post’s.

http://spacenews.com/nasas-a-3-test-stand-branded-a-349-million-monument-to-its-drift/


The latest entry in the Washington Post’s ongoing “Breaking Points” series (“examining the failures at the heart of troubled federal systems”) trots out the congressionally mandated completion of Stennis Space Center’s A-3 test stand as “evidence of a breakdown at NASA” and “a symbol of … what happens to a big bureaucracy after its sense of mission starts to fade.”

The story, “NASA’s $349 million monument to its drift,” debuted Dec. 15 on the Washington Post‘s website and ran in the next morning’s paper at the top of page one.

selvaarchi
2015-Feb-03, 02:16 PM
The latest budget request from NASA is in. They are looking for an extra US 500 million in 2016 over the 2015 numbers.

http://m.space.com/28433-nasa-budget-request-2016-deep-space.html?adbid=10152618798836466&adbpl=fb&adbpr=17610706465&cmpid=514630_20150203_39825747

The White House budget proposal for NASA in 2016 calls for a $500 million boost over the 2015 enacted budget and would keep NASA on its path to Mars, NASA chief Charles Bolden says.
The $18.5 billion budget request, presented by Bolden today (Feb. 2), includes funding for developing a mission to Jupiter's moon Europa, and the agency's asteroid redirect mission (ARM). Officials think ARM could help pave the way for crewed missions to the Red Planet by the 2030s.

selvaarchi
2015-Feb-05, 05:05 PM
Japan has increased their space budget by 18.5 percent over the current fiscal year that ends March 30. New budget for fiscal year 2015 is US$2.75 billion.

http://spacenews.com/japan-boosts-space-spending-in-support-of-security-focus/


The education ministry, which controls the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, represents the largest share of the total 2015 space budget at 182 billion yen, a 19 percent rise from the present year. This includes a 5.5 billion yen increase, to 12.5 billion yen, for development of the H-3 rocket to replace the nation’s current workhorse, the reliable but expensive H-2A, in 2020.

The JAXA budget also includes money for three new projects: a next-generation data relay satellite to cope with growing intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance traffic; an advanced optical imaging satellite that will carry a ballistic missile early warning sensor as a hosted payload in cooperation with the Ministry of Defense; and an effort to develop a new line of 150-kilogram multipurpose satellites that can be rapidly built and adapted to a range of missions.

selvaarchi
2015-Feb-07, 03:02 AM
Casey Dreier of Planetary Society take on the US NASA budget.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/casey-dreier/2015/0202-its-official-we-are-on-the-way-to-europa-fy2016.html


Not all of the news is good—but most of it is. I'm not used to saying that. I'll address some of the major issues in turn, and we'll explore more in future weeks here on the blog.

As you may know, the President's Budget Request is only the starting point for the coming fiscal debate within Congress. The numbers proposed are far from final. But it's an important document nonetheless, since it essentially defines official White House policy towards space exploration. This is important, since there are a multitude of small decisions that impact the space program that don't make it into Congressional bills. We find them here.

Ok, so we're kicking off the 2016 budget cycle with Congress. What are we kicking off with? I've condensed a few of the most interesting funding lines below. You can also see the full details in NASA's FY2016 Budget Request [pdf] or a really excellent writeup [also a pdf] by Marcia Smith at Space Policy Online.

selvaarchi
2015-Feb-19, 11:49 AM
India will be announcing their budget on the 28th of February. The Indian space advocates are hoping that ISRO will be rewarded for all their success in 2014 with a 50% increase on their budget.

http://www.businessinsider.in/Can-Indian-Space-Industry-expect-a-repeat-50-budget-increase-in-2015/articleshow/46285665.cms


In 2014 the Union Government of India allocated a 50% increased budget to ISRO granting Rs 6,000 crores (US$1.2 billion) planned and Rs 1,238 crores (approx US $ 25.75 million) unplanned. ISRO had a total of Rs 7,238 crores (approximately US$1.3 billion) as compared to the previous year budget allocation.

2014 was a successful year for ISRO with PSLV, GSLV launch vehicles for launching of satellites, Chandrayaan (Moon) probe and the recent wonder of the Mangalayaan or MOM ,the Mars probe, proving the combined efforts of ISRO and the Indian Space industry are on the right track.

The encouraging factor is that most of the missions have been accomplished the first time and on almost shoe-string budgets (Mars probe cost India just US $ 74 million) when compared to worldwide space programs.

It is also encouraging not only for ISRO but the Space sector industry involved in the development and manufacturing of the sensitive equipment. International awards have been earned and ISRO has made the country proud of its achievements.

ISRO and the Indian Space Sector are proud examples and have given the right impetus to the Prime Minister's 'Made in India' drive by largely using components and technology developed within the country cutting down costs considerably.

ISRO is spreading its wings and the year 2015 is going to be packed with several important missions and in tandem it will be increasing and improving its launch pads, infrastructure and technical support.

publiusr
2015-Feb-22, 09:47 PM
Consolidation within Boeing
http://spacenews.com/boeing-folds-sls-cst-100-space-capsule-into-new-division/

I wonder what will come from the OrbitalATK merger

selvaarchi
2015-Mar-01, 03:09 AM
Sorry the previous article with a budget increase for the Indian space program was an article from two years ago. I mixed up the links. Here is the latest Indian space budget.

http://zeenews.india.com/news/sci-tech/department-of-space-gets-rs-6000-crore-in-budget_1554273.html


The government has allocated Rs 6000 crore for the Department of Space in the Union Budget for 2015-16, with a major thrust on Launch Vehicle Technology projects.

With the emphasis on Launch Vehicle Technology projects, the government has allocated Rs 2148 crore for developments in this direction.

For Total Launch support, tracking the satellites, the government has allocated Rs 651 crore. For operations of the INSAT programmes that includes the GSAT and INSAT satellites, Rs 1281 crore has been allocated.

selvaarchi
2015-Mar-11, 11:55 AM
SpaceNews with a breakdown of the Indian budget.

http://spacenews.com/india-allocates-1-2-billion-for-space-activities/



Launch vehicle development and production activities are the dominant feature of an Indian Space Research Organisation budget allocation of 73.9 billion rupees ($1.2 billion) for the 2015-2016 fiscal year, which begins April 1.

The total, presented to the parliament Feb. 28, is roughly level with the 2014-15 budget presented last year. However, ISRO typically spends significantly less money than is allocated in any given budget year — for 2014-15 it spent just 58 billion rupees of the 72 billion rupee allocation — so it seems likely that spending in the coming year will fall short of 73.9 billion rupees. ISRO spokesman Deviprasad Karnik acknowledged the possibility that ISRO’s budget will be reduced before the end of the year.

That said, the total allocation for launch vehicle technology is 26 billion rupees, a sum that includes 3.15 billion rupees for continued development and operationalization of the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mark -3, which will be capable of lifting 4 metric tons to geostationary transfer orbit and flew a suborbital test mission in December. The budget also includes 3.12 billion rupees for production of ISRO’s workhorse Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle.

NEOWatcher
2015-Mar-11, 03:41 PM
SpaceNews with a breakdown of the Indian budget.
I'm surprised at such a low amount of money allocated for human spaceflight.
It doesn't look like they are going to put a lot of effort into getting a human up there in 2017. But; they did say end of the decade too. Maybe they are just waiting to get the new rockets off the ground before putting that effort in.

selvaarchi
2015-Mar-11, 10:24 PM
I'm surprised at such a low amount of money allocated for human spaceflight.
It doesn't look like they are going to put a lot of effort into getting a human up there in 2017. But; they did say end of the decade too. Maybe they are just waiting to get the new rockets off the ground before putting that effort in.
They need to get GSLV MkIII operational before that. The first test flight of the GSLV MkIII is only going to take place in December 2016.

So with with no hiccups in the GSLV MkIII development, the earliest we can hope for a Indian human spaceflight is 2018/19. 2020 might be more realistic. The budget reflects that.

selvaarchi
2015-May-05, 02:23 AM
US to slash funds for Earth science by more than US $300 million.

http://www.chinatopix.com/articles/48126/20150504/us-cuts-down-nasas-earth-science-budget-space-exploration-first-before-climate-change.htm


Thursday, the bill was passed by the House Science, Space and Technology Committee where it will slash down fundings for Earth science by more than US $300 million where the rest will be utilized for space flight programs and missions that is estimated to reach $200 million.

NEOWatcher
2015-May-05, 04:17 PM
US to slash funds for Earth science by more than US $300 million.
Really? An article about US funding from a Chinese media source? That article doesn't even give any idea of scale, just a dollar amount... and not even a concise dollar amount.

When I hear such a bad article, it's time to look for one with actual details. Although, that's not an easy task given that all the news about this is more about people screaming than it is about actual budget comparisons.

more details[/quote]The cut is ([url=http://arstechnica.com/science/2015/05/01/house-science-committee-guts-nasa-earth-sciences-budget/) $320M, or about 18% from 2015 levels (http://spacenews.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/2016_nasa_whitehouse_budget.jpg).

The bad news is that this is a fairly large cut, and even a bigger cut than the proposed budget. The good news is that NASA's budget is still larger and the money is mostly being re-directed to space programs.

But; we did see all that coming (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php?155248-Sad-Times-ahead-for-NASA), unfortunately. I'm surprised it wasn't worse.

Trebuchet
2015-May-05, 05:33 PM
Phil Plait has a couple of recent blog posts on the subject:
http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2015/04/30/nasa_budget_gop_committee_wants_to_slash_and_burn_ earth_sciences.html
http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2015/04/30/charles_bolden_nasa_chief_statement_on_house_cutti ng_earth_sciences.html

selvaarchi
2015-May-06, 01:02 PM
Looks like NASA is not the only organization whose budget get changed and cut by the government. ISRO faces the same problem.

http://www.livemint.com/Politics/PwjV0Qv9USUuIgn3hdH1UL/Report-criticizes-funding-cuts-for-Indias-space-programme.html


Funding cuts in the revised estimate for the space department’s key polar satellite launch vehicle (PSLV) and geosynchronous satellite launch vehicle (GSLV) projects has drawn criticism from Parliament’s standing committee on science, technology, environment and forests.
In a report released on Tuesday, the panel also pulled up the department for delays in implementing projects, including astronomy satellite Astrosat and a proposed human space flight programme.
The report identified technical hurdles and project delays as the reasons for India lagging behind China in many areas of space science.
The report stressed the need for greater industry participation in space programme and promotion of indigenous capabilities in related manufacturing. The panel was also critical of the space department for not putting in place a national committee to enhance industry participation.

NEOWatcher
2015-May-06, 11:12 PM
Looks like NASA is not the only organization whose budget get changed and cut by the government.
Just to be clear, NASA's budget is not cut, but it is changed. They are still getting $500M more than last year (from what I can tell), and the boost is going mainly for SLS and Orion. The beef is that Congress is shifting the money away from climate research which is an highly partisan indicator of more than just a line item budget cut.

Of course the budget has not yet been approved yet.

selvaarchi
2015-May-06, 11:37 PM
Just to be clear, NASA's budget is not cut, but it is changed. They are still getting $500M more than last year (from what I can tell), and the boost is going mainly for SLS and Orion. The beef is that Congress is shifting the money away from climate research which is an highly partisan indicator of more than just a line item budget cut.

Of course the budget has not yet been approved yet.
For India it is budget cuts. Was surprised to read the GSLV budget was also cut.

" There were concerns regarding the GSLV project for which budgetary allocation of Rs.180.1 crore in 2014-15 was reduced to Rs.107 crore due to delay in buying hardware and sub-systems for the first developmental flight."

Explains why we had all that delay for the flight.

selvaarchi
2015-Jul-11, 07:19 AM
Arianespace announces 2014 profit and record revenue

http://www.arianespace.com/news-press-release/2015/5-18-2015-FinancialResults2014.asp


Arianespace reported 2014 revenue of €1.399 billion, a 41% increase over 2013 revenue of €989 million.

The company's turnover total for 2014 reflects its operational performance, with a total of 11 launches (six by Ariane 5, four by Soyuz, one by Vega), compared with seven launches from the Guiana Space Center in 2013 (4 by Ariane 5, 2 by Soyuz, 1 by Vega), and one launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Arianespace returned back to profit, reporting a net income of €3 million.

selvaarchi
2015-Jul-11, 07:56 AM
A summary report of "The Space Report" for 2014 is given below. Unfortunately the full report needs payment:(. But the summary does have a lot of information of how the space business id developing.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2015/07/10/global-space-economy-grew-9-percent-330-billion-year/


In 2014, the global space economy grew slightly more than 9 percent, reaching a total of $330 billion worldwide, up from 2013’s $302.5 billion. Together, commercial space activities made up 76 percent of the global space economy. The industry as a whole demonstrated a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of seven percent from 2005 to 2014, nearly doubling in size over the course of the decade.

U.S. government space spending went up slightly, 2.9 percent, from 2013 to 2014. The U.S. devoted 1.2 percent of the government’s national budget to space in 2014. During that year, U.S. government space spending made up more than half of what all governments around the world spent on space. Space expenditures by governments other than the U.S. grew 12.9 percent in 2014, in spite of decreases in budgets of international cooperative efforts such as the European Space Agency.


In 2014, global navigation satellite system receivers, such as the ones integrated with smartphone microchips, were the primary driver behind a nearly 18 percent increase in revenue for commercial space infrastructure and support industries. More than 3 billion mobile devices receive signals, not only from U.S. GPS satellites, but also from the Russian GLONASS and a variety of satellite-based augmentation systems. About 2.8 billion location-based application services were downloaded to these mobile devices during 2014.

The overall value of satellites launched in 2014 decreased by 13.6 percent from 2013, partly driven by decreases in the number of high-value military satellite launches.

selvaarchi
2015-Aug-08, 09:18 AM
This article in the Indian times has the cost of the GSLV MK II in it,

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/science/isro-to-launch-9-nano/micro-american-satellites-during-2015-16/articleshow/48347993.cms


Sivan also said that the fully indigenous developed Geo-synchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) D6 would be launched by end of this month, adding the cost of the 2.5 tonne vehicle would be around Rs 250 crore.

selvaarchi
2015-Aug-13, 02:56 PM
Smallsat Launches are "shooting" up according to the latest report from SpaceWorks.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2015/08/13/spaceworks-review-finds-sharp-increase-smallsat-launches/


2014

SpaceWorks’ 2014 Projection estimated between 140 and 143 nano/microsatellites across all sectors would launch globally in 2014; 158 nano/microsatellites were actually launched. This represented an increase of nearly 72% compared to 2013.

2015+

In 2014, 107 commercial nano/microsatellites (1-50 kg) launched and thousands of commercial small satellites
(101-500 kg) are planned for launch over the next fifteen years. Recent multi-million and multi-billion dollar investments in various ventures confirm the commercial sector’s continued interest in the nano/microsatellite and small satellite industries.

selvaarchi
2015-Oct-28, 08:50 PM
Government spending on space is projected to increase over the next few years, reaching $81.4 billion by 2024.

http://spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?utm_medium=srs.gs-twitter&utm_source=t.co&utm_content=api&pid=47174&utm_campaign=


"Despite budget cuts, governments should maintain high launch rates over the next decade: 856 government satellites are planned for launch between 2015 and 2024, a 32% increase from the last decade, driven by civil Earth observation, communications and satellite navigation missions," said Steve Bochinger, COO at Euroconsult and editor of the report. "242 defense satellites are expected to be launched over the next 10 years, an 11% increase compared to the past of which 40% will be launched for the U.S. government."

The report assesses key economic and program trends for each major space application.

publiusr
2015-Oct-31, 08:11 PM
Good news.

selvaarchi
2015-Nov-13, 04:30 AM
This is good news from the Russian front. Russia will have a budget of roughly $37 billion to last through 2025.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Putin_on_Space_Industry_Russian_Rockets_Must_Be_Re liable_and_Competitive_999.html


"Russian rockets must be reliable and competitive, meet requirements of leading domestic and foreign customers," the president stressed.

Putin stressed the development and equipment of the International Space Stations with the newest technologies should be a priority for the Russian Federal Space Program.

Fundamental space exploration should also be prioritized, the president said. According to the Russian space agency Roscosmos, the Federal Space Program will have a budget of roughly $37 billion to last through 2025.

NEOWatcher
2015-Nov-17, 01:23 AM
This is good news from the Russian front. Russia will have a budget of roughly $37 billion to last through 2025.
That's not really good news. Maybe the fact that a 10 year budget has been approved is, but the $37B figure was submitted several months ago, and represents a cut of about 35% (http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/organizations/roscosmos/russias-new-space-program-search-extraterrestrial-life-amid-budget-cuts/).

selvaarchi
2015-Dec-19, 03:21 PM
NASA has hit the jackpot ☺. Just read what has been approved for next year - everything plus more!!!

http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php?t=159500

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

selvaarchi
2015-Dec-22, 11:39 PM
The Space Review's take on the latest NASA budget. I like their title for the article - "A little something for almost everyone"

http://www.thespacereview.com/article/2888/1

It’s a big win, but is it a lasting one? The additional funding papered over differences of opinion about NASA’s priorities, including science and exploration, by adding enough money to give most constituencies what they wanted in terms of funding without having to take money from other programs. The final bill could, in fact, exacerbate those differences, particularly in the additional direction it gives NASA in areas like a Europa mission of development of cislunar habitats.

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

selvaarchi
2016-Jan-17, 03:17 PM
NASA is not the only organization to get a budget boost in 2016. ESA is to get a 18.4% boost compared to last year.

http://spacenews.com/esa-members-give-space-agency-an-18-percent-budget-boost/


The European Space Agency on Jan. 15 said its 2016 budget of 5.25 billion euros ($5.71 billion) is up 18.4 percent compared to last year on the strength of higher contributions by several member governments, especially Italy, and substantially increased investment by the European Commission.

The Brussels, Belgium-based commission has become ESA’s biggest paymaster, mainly because of the Galileo positioning, navigation and timing network and the Copernicus Earth observation program and its fleet of Sentinel satellites. Both have entered satellite-deployment phase.

The commission owns both these programs and has hired ESA to perform technical and contract oversight.

publiusr
2016-Jan-17, 09:11 PM
But Russian space takes a hit. Sad.

selvaarchi
2016-Feb-07, 01:18 AM
ISRO can look forward to a 50% increase in its budget for this year:clap:

http://www.defencenews.in/article.aspx?id=2632

selvaarchi
2016-Feb-13, 12:47 PM
Seen no comments on NASA's budget for next year. I am starting the ball rolling by posting the review on the budget by Casey Dreier from the Planetary Society.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/casey-dreier/2016/0209-first-details-of-nasas-fy2017-budget-request.html


The President proposes to cut the space agency by roughly $260 million, down to $19.025 billion in 2017. On the plus side, this represents the highest-ever request from the Obama administration, representing a 2.7 percent increase over their 2016 request. That’s a step in the right direction, though NASA needs to grow, not shrink, if we want it to achieve the goals set out for it by the nation. In the parlance of my previous post, this is closest to the “Most Likely Outcome” I predicted.

Note: we are still working to understand exactly how the President's budget pays for a variety of programmatic initiatives and the implications of Congress's reticence to new tax proposals. See this discussion by Marcia Smith at Space Policy Online for more details. For the time being, however, we will take the budgetary numbers of the President's request at face value.

publiusr
2016-Feb-13, 08:08 PM
Erg. Europa looks to be put off--but that gives more time to develop a lander. The dual payloads, even with SLS will have to have gravity assists--but that was the plan for the Clipper anyway just by itself on Atlas--so no biggie.

selvaarchi
2016-Mar-08, 11:54 PM
No increase in ISRO budget this year :(. The budget instead focused on the the rural sector of India.

http://www.dailyo.in/business/budget-2016-isro-human-space-flight-programme-nuclear-power-plants-saarc-rural-sector-csir-dst-dbt/story/1/9426.html


The annual Budget exercise catches people's attention mainly for direct and indirect tax proposals because they affect common man and decide if prices of commodities and services will go up or down. The other important component of the Budget is allocation of funds for different sectors or ministries.

This year's highlight was, of course, the rural sector. Several other sectors, however, are disappointed at allocations made for them. Scientific departments are among those affected by lower than expected funding.

The Department of Space, for instance, has been allocated about Rs 6,000 crore. For a scientific agency engaged in critical missions and projects, this kind of money is dismal. It only means that the department, which funds the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and about a dozen space laboratories under it, can only carry on with ongoing projects.

publiusr
2016-Mar-11, 09:55 PM
Some budget battles
http://spacenews.com/senators-criticize-funding-gimmicks-in-nasas-19-billion-budget-request/

Both Sen. Barbara Mikulski and Shelby stand united on this issue.

The Europa lander looks a go
http://spacenews.com/nasa-pressing-ahead-with-studies-of-a-europa-lander/

selvaarchi
2016-Mar-27, 12:57 PM
Canada post a positive space budget (http://www.parabolicarc.com/2016/03/25/aiac-praises-boost-canadian-space-station-spending/) with a commitment to the ISS to 2024.

selvaarchi
2016-Mar-31, 03:29 PM
The latest answers in the Indian parliament gives a lot of details of how much ISRO charged other countries to launch their satellites .

http://spacenews.com/indias-government-says-pslv-launches-generated-101-million-in-commercial-launch-fees-2013-2015/

India’s PSLV rocket launched 28 non-Indian satellites between 2013 and 2015, generating 80.6 million euros ($101 million) in commercial launch fees, mainly on the strength of three missions carrying foreign satellites as the main payloads, the Indian prime minister’s office said.

In a March 3 response to parliamentary questions, Jitendra Singh, a minister of state in the prime minister’s office whose responsibilities include India’s Department of Space, listed the 28 satellites and the revenue India’s PSLV rocket launched 28 non-Indian satellites between 2013 and 2015, generating 80.6 million euros ($101 million) in commercial launch fees, mainly on the strength of three missions carrying foreign satellites as the main payloads, the Indian prime minister’s office said.

In a March 3 response to parliamentary questions, Jitendra Singh, a minister of state in the prime minister’s office whose responsibilities include India’s Department of Space, listed the 28 satellites and the revenue generated from their launches.

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selvaarchi
2016-Mar-31, 04:46 PM
The reporter got one potion of his report wrong. -
"Also unclear is whether the Indian Space Research Organization will increase its launch cadence to capture a greater commercial market share. The PSLV conducted 10 launches in the three years ending Dec. 31, 2015.

In May 2015, the Indian government’s Union Cabinet announced it had budgeted 30.9 billion Indian rupees, or $466 million at current exchange rates, to build and launch 15 PSLV rockets between 2017 and 2020, suggesting no increase in launch rate."

There is going to be a massive increase in launches. Already they have launched twice this year and there is a firm launch date next month. They have stated they hope to launch 10 times this year and then monthly for the next two years. They are also looking at building another launch pad to increase the number of launches even more


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selvaarchi
2016-Apr-06, 04:15 PM
NASA's deep space exploring programme will cost US$23.8 billion.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2016/04/05/nasa-spending-238-billion-developing-deep-space-exploration-programs/


A new Government Accountability Office (GAO) report places the formulation and development costs of the Space Launch System (SLS), the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle and related ground systems at just under $23.8 billion.

The total includes $11.28 billion for Orion, $9.69 billion for SLS, and $2.81 billion for exploration ground systems at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

The figures are included in a new GAO report released last week titled, “NASA: Assessment of Major Projects.” In the report, GAO looked at the space agency’s deep space exploration effort and other major programs.

selvaarchi
2016-Apr-14, 11:43 AM
One way we compare budgets across countries is to see the size of the countries in GDP terms. I came across this table which gives the GDP in both current prices and also on Purchasing power parity (PPP) for 2015 (http://knoema.com/nwnfkne/world-gdp-ranking-2015-data-and-charts). Interesting insights for me on how the Asian countries are bunching up to the top.

publiusr
2016-Apr-16, 08:01 PM
NASA's deep space exploring programme will cost US$23.8 billion.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2016/04/05/nasa-spending-238-billion-developing-deep-space-exploration-programs/

It's worth it--I know--development costs money--but this will give rise to more capable missions of the future.

selvaarchi
2016-Oct-03, 03:27 PM
India's order book to launch foreign satellites stand at US$42 million.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Third_party_satellite_launch_order_bookings_for_Is ro_stands_at_42_million_999.html


India has a satellite launch order book of around $42 million for third parties. The country is also in discussions with others for contract manufacturing of meteorological satellites, said top Indian space officials here on Monday.

The officials spoke to the media here after the successful launch of eight satellites-three Indian and five foreign-with an Indian rocket Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV).

"Our order book size for launching foreign satellites stands at around $42 million. This will take us around two/three years to exhaust," said of Antrix Corporation's Chairman-cum-Managing Director S. Rakesh.

Rakesh said discussions are on with several parties for orders worth a similar amount. The Antrix Corporation is the commercial arm of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO).

selvaarchi
2016-Dec-03, 01:49 PM
Highlights of ESA bubget for next year. It has been set at €10.3 billion ($11 billion) - a reduction from the €11 billion ($11.74 billion) that Director General Jan Dietrich Woerner had sought. The good news is they have endorsed the plan to extent the ISS to 2024.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2016/12/02/esa-approves-103-billion-euro-budget-iss-extended-exomars-funded/


Ministers from 22 ESA member countries approved a multi-year spending plan of €10.3 billion ($11 billion) for the European space agency, a reduction from the €11 billion ($11.74 billion) that Director General Jan Dietrich Woerner had sought.

The budget includes an extension of the International Space Station to 2020 to 2024. ESA was the last of the international partners to approve the extension after the United States, Russia, Japan and Canada.

Officials said ESA would spend €961 million on ISS, including €807 million on operations and an additional €153 million for scientific utilization of the orbiting laboratory. ESA also will begin planning how it will use the space station for the 2020 to 2024 period.

selvaarchi
2017-Feb-13, 03:06 PM
Hidden in this repot is information that ISRO has had a 23% increase in its budget.

https://thewire.in/107924/107924/

"Finance minister Arun Jaitley gave the Department of Space a 23% increase in its budget. Under the space sciences section, the budget mentions provisions “for Mars Orbiter Mission II and Mission to Venus”. The second mission to Mars is tentatively slated for a 2021-2022 timeframe and, per existing plans, it may involve putting a rover on the surface of the red planet."

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selvaarchi
2017-Feb-14, 07:08 AM
Hidden in this repot is information that ISRO has had a 23% increase in its budget.

https://thewire.in/107924/107924/

"Finance minister Arun Jaitley gave the Department of Space a 23% increase in its budget. Under the space sciences section, the budget mentions provisions “for Mars Orbiter Mission II and Mission to Venus”. The second mission to Mars is tentatively slated for a 2021-2022 timeframe and, per existing plans, it may involve putting a rover on the surface of the red planet."

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Confirmation of ISRO's budget increase.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/02/as-us-russia-eye-stagnant-space-budgets-india-ramps-up-investment/

"As the United States' NASA and Russia's Roscosmos, the world's most accomplished space agencies, face stagnant or even reduced budgets, India is increasing its space exploration spending for 2017-18 by more than 20 percent, from about $1.1 billion to $1.4 billion. Budget documents recently released by the agency show particularly healthy increases for space technology and space science, reflecting a belief by the Indian government that investing in space exploration will benefit the country in the long term.

The increases will provide initial funding for two new ambitious Indian space science missions—one to Mars and another to Venus. Although the budget documents do not provide much detail, reports in Indian newspapers suggest that the "Mars Orbiter Mission II" may include some kind of lander, with a launch in 2021 or 2022; the "Mission to Venus" will be a more straightforward orbiter. With plans for a Martian lander, it appears that India is trying to compete with the space program of China, its regional Asian rival."

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selvaarchi
2017-Jul-19, 12:52 PM
Positive news on Indian earnings from the launching of foreign satellites.

http://m.hindustantimes.com/science/isro-earned-6-1-million-euros-for-launching-29-foreign-nano-satellites-in-june-23/story-iq2rK1KwvZLsz7aZ5Pc4xO.html

"Antrix Corporation Limited (ACL), the commercial and marketing arm of ISRO, earned 6.1 million euros (about R. 45.2 crore) from the launch of 29 foreign nano satellites, that were put in orbit along with the Cartosat 2, on June 23."

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selvaarchi
2019-Feb-17, 12:56 AM
Casey Dreier from Planetary Society reports on positive news for NASA's budget.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/casey-dreier/2019/0215-fy2019-nasa-gets-its-best-budget-in-decades.html


After months of unrelated political turmoil, multiple stop-gap spending bills, and an unprecedented government shutdown that shuttered the U.S. space program for 35 days, legislation providing NASA's 2019 budget was finally signed into law today. Remarkably, NASA did very well in the end.

Congress provided $21.5 billion to NASA in fiscal year 2019. That's a 3.5% increase from the previous year and 8% above that proposed by the White House. The additional funds were spread widely throughout the agency, particularly benefitting the science, aeronautics, and human exploration programs. Adjusting for inflation, this is NASA's best budget since 1996.