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Gorn
2014-Jul-16, 04:02 AM
Hello. Does anyone feel (ie. like I do ) that there is a need for 'better naming' of space missions?

Eg. Ukube1...means a cubesat mission for the UK.

There has 'got' to be a 'revolution' in space mission naming. Does anyone agree? Any suggestions?

Also, the names of stars and exoplanets could do for name changes as well..any suggestions?

Bye
SC

Jens
2014-Jul-16, 10:06 AM
I'm not sure exactly what the problem is with current naming.

And also, naming by who?

You're thinking of a system like airlines? So each country would have a code, and then you append the name of the launch? So for example, Mercury 1 would be US001, and Sputnik would be SR001, for example? I think it might make it hard to remember.

Swift
2014-Jul-16, 12:45 PM
As this did not seem a straight-forward question with a single mainstream answer, but more like the opening for an extended discussion, I've moved this thread from Q&A to Space Exploration.

NEOWatcher
2014-Jul-16, 01:58 PM
There is the COSPAR/NSSDC ID (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Designator).

IsaacKuo
2014-Jul-16, 02:33 PM
How about something like 2007 VN84? It's consistent and fits in with an existing standard...

NEOWatcher
2014-Jul-16, 02:57 PM
How about something like 2007 VN84? It's consistent and fits in with an existing standard...
I don't know what you are basing that on.

COSPAR is based on the launch. Since Ukube is not launched yet, it won't have a designation.
I don't know where the are in the numbering right now (the April Cots mission was 22), so for the sake of argument, let's say it's going to be the 32nd launch of the year.
We will get:
2014-32A for the rocket.
And anywhere from 2014-32B to 2014-32I depending one how they lay out the docket since there are 8 sats on that mission.

IsaacKuo
2014-Jul-16, 03:54 PM
I don't know what you are basing that on.
It's based on when someone "discovers" it.

NEOWatcher
2014-Jul-16, 05:25 PM
It's based on when someone "discovers" it.
I think we are talking about two different things.
You seem to be talking about something (space objects) other than "space missions".

IsaacKuo
2014-Jul-16, 05:43 PM
I think we are talking about two different things.
You seem to be talking about something (space objects) other than "space missions".
No, in fact 2007 VN84 is about to have a close encounter with a double nucleus comet...

NEOWatcher
2014-Jul-16, 06:11 PM
No, in fact 2007 VN84 is about to have a close encounter with a double nucleus comet...
Now that they found out it is a terrestrial object, they are retiring that designation (http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2007/1227.html).
My guess would be it is now 2004-006B.

KaiYeves
2014-Jul-17, 01:40 PM
Everyone here is assuming the OP means standardization of names, but the impression I got from the post was that en means names more interesting/poetic than "UKube1".

IsaacKuo
2014-Jul-17, 02:03 PM
I was just making a joke, not a serious answer.

Gorn
2014-Jul-18, 12:50 AM
Hello. Answer yes..that's what the OP was driving at. By the way..just for now..what does ' OP ' stand for?

Bye
SC

NEOWatcher
2014-Jul-18, 01:01 PM
Hello. Answer yes..that's what the OP was driving at.
Yes what? or who?


By the way..just for now..what does ' OP ' stand for?
Original post(er)
You.