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Noclevername
2014-Jul-26, 02:51 PM
Personal plea: If you feel you have to share a pic or video of a creepy thing, please just add a link to it, with plenty of warning. Some of us have serious trigger issues.

Moving-eye cat clocks.

Clown toys.

Those clanging-cymbal monkeys.

Centipedes.

Gillianren
2014-Jul-26, 03:35 PM
Any film with realistic descriptions of cannibalism. I don't get scared by movies, but I can't stop thinking about the situations those people (generally, given where I grew up, the Donner Party) went through that they were forced to make those choices. This is especially notable just before bed.

The other place I can't turn off my brain if I encounter it just before bed is anything about the vastness of the universe. When I was a child, PBS did a special about the possibility of life on other planets hosted by Lily Tomlin (for some reason), and the bit I remember most clearly was the discussion of the Drake Equation and the scientist who very solemnly announced that he believed there was no other intelligent life in the universe. I couldn't sleep for hours because I was thinking about that vast, empty space.

Trebuchet
2014-Jul-26, 03:42 PM
Weeping Angels. (Which is why they are my favorite Who monster.)
Hairy plants. Hair belongs on mammals.
Vines, with those tendrils wrap around things.
Seeing people on roofs.

grant hutchison
2014-Jul-26, 04:46 PM
Mainly, I'm creeped out by people who are dramatically creeped out by everyday things.
That sudden unexpected flailing "Ah, ooh, erk" recoil that abruptly turns the sane and rational person you were just dealing with into a crazy person, just because there's a gecko on the wall ten feet away. I get slightly panicky in the presence of that behaviour.
I get something similar when someone I've known for a long time, and deemed to be essentially a standard-issue Average Guy, suddenly drops into the conversation some completely bonkers idea. The one that springs to mind is someone I worked with for years, who responded to a passing remark about dinosaurs with - "Well, yes, if you believe in dinosaurs." The hair stood up on the back of neck.

Grant Hutchison

Noclevername
2014-Jul-26, 04:56 PM
"Well, yes, if you believe in dinosaurs."

Everyone knows the Devil put those bones in the ground in order to... to make... er, to lead us... to somehow make some kind of sin? OK, I got nothin'.

publiusr
2014-Jul-26, 05:00 PM
Large waves...the supercell from the Tuscaloosa Birmingham tornado of 2011, and the Clay, Alabama night tornado I heard around four a.m. in Jan 2012.
The lights blinked as the thing crossed the road. (Power stayed on here, being closer to the substation I guess).

Solfe
2014-Jul-26, 05:01 PM
Clown toys.


Real clowns. :)

Noclevername
2014-Jul-26, 05:07 PM
Real clowns. :)

For some reason they never bothered me. Just the toys.

Gillianren
2014-Jul-26, 05:12 PM
That sudden unexpected flailing "Ah, ooh, erk" recoil that abruptly turns the sane and rational person you were just dealing with into a crazy person, just because there's a gecko on the wall ten feet away. I get slightly panicky in the presence of that behaviour.

The other girls in my Girl Scout troop in fourth and fifth grade freaked out over a little tiny lizard while we were on a "camping" trip. I mean, we're talking maybe three or four inches long, tops, sitting on a rock some distance away and not even looking at them. I just thought it was tedious of them.


I get something similar when someone I've known for a long time, and deemed to be essentially a standard-issue Average Guy, suddenly drops into the conversation some completely bonkers idea. The one that springs to mind is someone I worked with for years, who responded to a passing remark about dinosaurs with - "Well, yes, if you believe in dinosaurs." The hair stood up on the back of neck.

Yeah, I've had that feeling a time or two. "Oh. You . . . oh. Well, let me just reconsider my entire opinion of you as a person."

publiusr
2014-Jul-26, 05:13 PM
I have heard it said that Kim Peek was afraid of clock faces and mirrors...

KaiYeves
2014-Jul-26, 05:50 PM
Any film with realistic descriptions of cannibalism. I don't get scared by movies, but I can't stop thinking about the situations those people (generally, given where I grew up, the Donner Party) went through that they were forced to make those choices. This is especially notable just before bed.

The other place I can't turn off my brain if I encounter it just before bed is anything about the vastness of the universe. When I was a child, PBS did a special about the possibility of life on other planets hosted by Lily Tomlin (for some reason), and the bit I remember most clearly was the discussion of the Drake Equation and the scientist who very solemnly announced that he believed there was no other intelligent life in the universe. I couldn't sleep for hours because I was thinking about that vast, empty space.
Agreed about the cannibalism. I recently read a book that began with a graphic written description that still left me wanting a barf bag.

Torsten
2014-Jul-26, 05:50 PM
I've seen a few videos showing surface melt of the Greenland ice sheet. Invariably, the videos will show huge flows of water disappearing into holes in the ice. When I see that, I can't help but think of falling into that water and ending up down that hole. Creepy.

BigDon
2014-Jul-26, 06:18 PM
Good one Torsten. I get that one too.

Leeches.

One of the few creatures "small and slimey" that get me.

At the aquarium store I worked for they would come in on wild caught turtles and crawfish.

Disgusting creatures. Yes, I squirmed during the leech scene in Stand By Me.

Paul Beardsley
2014-Jul-26, 06:54 PM
The year 2013. Just thinking about it right now makes me tearful. I don't even have to focus on any one event of that year - it is the thought of the year itself that fills me with distress.

At least I don't have to live in fear of it coming round again.

Noclevername
2014-Jul-26, 07:06 PM
Leeches.


Any parasite large enough to see, on or in the human body in general. I don't even watch shows like "Monsters Inside Me" because they make my skin crawl. And no, I don't want to hear about what kinds are common.

Swift
2014-Jul-26, 09:08 PM
Personal plea: If you feel you have to share a pic or video of a creepy thing, please just add a link to it, with plenty of warning. Some of us have serious trigger issues.

Our rules require all videos (and large pictures) to be links, whether creepy or not.

LPQMH
2014-Jul-26, 11:24 PM
Leeches.

I was in a group which was hit by leeches once. Ordinarily, I'd be OK with a woman frantically tearing her clothes off, but in this case - it was not good.

But, isn't the theme of this thread supposed to be things which creep "noclevername" out?

SkepticJ
2014-Jul-27, 12:54 AM
Kawaii, the insufferably twee output of Japanese pop-culture.

What makes it especially creepy is that adults (by chronological years, clearly not by mental maturity) indulge in it. Flavors of Michael Jackson.

KaiYeves
2014-Jul-27, 01:19 AM
Caves that are large enough for there to be areas where no natural light penetrates. Just the idea of being stuck underground in total darkness makes my heart rate rise. In Menorca, we went through a tunnel that was big enough and had a bend so that in the middle of it, it was totally dark, and I freaked out, even though the entrance was no more than thirty feet behind me and there were other people right there. And don't get me started on those movies where people get trapped in caves and then picked off by Horrible Underground Things... *shiver*

Solfe
2014-Jul-27, 02:04 AM
Lava creeps me out. The idea of the same substance that makes up the ground being red hot and liquid is just mind blowing. Thankfully, my brain is too tiny to grasp the idea that magma and lava makes up the majority of the planet. I'd need therapy if I could just hold on to that concept.

I used to be creeped out by bugs, but once my wife and I started a family, I stopped being such a chicken. I don't want to impress upon the kids a needless fear of crawly things.

For some reason the concept of the depth of the ocean bothers me. I don't fear drowning, but the idea of going all the way to the bottom is creepy. My wife doesn't fathom (I couldn't help it) my fear, which means she is trying to get me to go on a cruise.

Other creepy things - The art work in any number of Pink Floyd albums. For some reason the images on the lyric sheet for Wearing the Inside Out bothers the heck out me.

1972319724

(Edit - The thumbnails don't get too much bigger, sorry.)

As you can see, there is nothing particular weird (for Pink Floyd based art) about the images. But when combined with the lyrics... the whole thing is creepy. Here is a live version of the song (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mlTPBCGPYLY) from Youtube. It is my favorite song from the album.

Trebuchet
2014-Jul-27, 02:17 AM
Raw egg whites. Might as well be mucous.

Inclusa
2014-Jul-27, 02:32 AM
Good one Torsten. I get that one too.

Leeches.

One of the few creatures "small and slimey" that get me.

At the aquarium store I worked for they would come in on wild caught turtles and crawfish.

Disgusting creatures. Yes, I squirmed during the leech scene in Stand By Me.

I remembered that you keep an arrangement of critters yourself. Ok, a ball python is quite widely acceptable today.
In spite of the following pictures, I still find Periplaneta Americana and Blattella germanicus somewhat creepy.

http://www.roachforum.com/index.php?showtopic=4306

starcanuck64
2014-Jul-27, 02:56 AM
I've seen a few videos showing surface melt of the Greenland ice sheet. Invariably, the videos will show huge flows of water disappearing into holes in the ice. When I see that, I can't help but think of falling into that water and ending up down that hole. Creepy.

It's amazing how much water can be drained in a very short period of time that way. On James Balog's Extreme Ice Survey documentary, he was on the Greenland ice sheet with some researchers camped near a meltwater lake up to 50 feet deep and a couple of kilometers across. The water eventually found a way down through the ice and the lake drained in a few hours through a moulin.

DonM435
2014-Jul-27, 04:05 PM
In my years as a zoology student and an anatomy instructor, Iíve examined and dissected a lot of animal species: sponges, corals, worms, big grasshoppers and bigger tropical roaches, frogs, lizards, birds, cats and the occasional human cadaver.

However, once presented with a plump garden spider, I deferred, let someone else do it. I didnít want to touch the thing. I find garden spiders particularly repulsive. With their shiny metallic black-and-silver cephalothorax and that bloated tiger-striped abdomen, they look like an unholy fusion of technology and savagery.

Then again, the spiders that stay in their webs and eat bugs donít bother me, but the ones that roam about and are likely to pop up anywhere do.

So, I guess that spiders are rather special in this regard.

Noclevername
2014-Jul-27, 07:22 PM
But, isn't the theme of this thread supposed to be things which creep "noclevername" out?

I throw open the floor to all others' creepifying things.

Paul Beardsley
2014-Jul-27, 08:56 PM
Following KaiYeves's post, certain aspects of caving. Which I've never done (apart from tourist visits to the Blue John caverns and stuff like that) but I have spoken to experienced cavers.

Imagine wriggling along a passageway so narrow you cannot turn around. You follow it for a mile or more, painfully slowly. You come to a steep downward part and you slide, head first, down some distance. You know you cannot easily reverse back up that. You carry on for a bit and it narrows some more. Maybe if you really squeeze your way it will widen out again... and maybe it won't. Maybe you could go into reverse, but you've got that steep bit. And maybe it will rain while you are trying to decide.

It's not a game. You make your decision and you live with the consequences. There are untold tons of rock above you, and the world's geology could not care less about the human stuck midway along a passageway.

DonM435
2014-Jul-27, 09:58 PM
I don't think that I'm particularly clasutrophobic, but no way would I go into anything within which I couldn't turn around. Not unless I had reliable people right behind me to extract me!

Paul Beardsley
2014-Jul-27, 10:14 PM
Would you trust them?

Or rather, how far would you trust them?

DonM435
2014-Jul-27, 10:23 PM
They'd have to be very close!

Solfe
2014-Jul-27, 10:38 PM
Following KaiYeves's post, certain aspects of caving. Which I've never done (apart from tourist visits to the Blue John caverns and stuff like that) but I have spoken to experienced cavers.

Imagine wriggling along a passageway so narrow you cannot turn around. You follow it for a mile or more, painfully slowly. You come to a steep downward part and you slide, head first, down some distance. You know you cannot easily reverse back up that. You carry on for a bit and it narrows some more. Maybe if you really squeeze your way it will widen out again... and maybe it won't. Maybe you could go into reverse, but you've got that steep bit. And maybe it will rain while you are trying to decide.

It's not a game. You make your decision and you live with the consequences. There are untold tons of rock above you, and the world's geology could not care less about the human stuck midway along a passageway.

I just threw up.

Noclevername
2014-Jul-27, 10:43 PM
Tiaras and Toddlers. And all others of its ilk. "Reality" shows in general make me sick, but ones that exploit kids are really twisted.

Trebuchet
2014-Jul-27, 11:04 PM
Following KaiYeves's post, certain aspects of caving. Which I've never done (apart from tourist visits to the Blue John caverns and stuff like that) but I have spoken to experienced cavers.

Imagine wriggling along a passageway so narrow you cannot turn around. You follow it for a mile or more, painfully slowly. You come to a steep downward part and you slide, head first, down some distance. You know you cannot easily reverse back up that. You carry on for a bit and it narrows some more. Maybe if you really squeeze your way it will widen out again... and maybe it won't. Maybe you could go into reverse, but you've got that steep bit. And maybe it will rain while you are trying to decide.

It's not a game. You make your decision and you live with the consequences. There are untold tons of rock above you, and the world's geology could not care less about the human stuck midway along a passageway.

I've had dreams like that. Not pleasant ones.

You want to make sure you've got your brass lamp. Otherwise you could be eaten by a grue.

Noclevername
2014-Jul-27, 11:44 PM
I don't mind caves, even deep ones, but only if they're fumigated. The creepy-crawlies in the caves creep me out.

Oh, and that scene in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom with the roomful of bugs. That was worse than the eyeball soup.


(Copy/pasted from the wrong thread, where I accidentally posted this.)

KaiYeves
2014-Jul-28, 12:36 AM
Following KaiYeves's post, certain aspects of caving. Which I've never done (apart from tourist visits to the Blue John caverns and stuff like that) but I have spoken to experienced cavers.

Imagine wriggling along a passageway so narrow you cannot turn around. You follow it for a mile or more, painfully slowly. You come to a steep downward part and you slide, head first, down some distance. You know you cannot easily reverse back up that. You carry on for a bit and it narrows some more. Maybe if you really squeeze your way it will widen out again... and maybe it won't. Maybe you could go into reverse, but you've got that steep bit. And maybe it will rain while you are trying to decide.

It's not a game. You make your decision and you live with the consequences. There are untold tons of rock above you, and the world's geology could not care less about the human stuck midway along a passageway.
Ugh, no, no, no!

grapes
2014-Jul-28, 10:45 AM
Following KaiYeves's post, certain aspects of caving. Which I've never done (apart from tourist visits to the Blue John caverns and stuff like that) but I have spoken to experienced cavers.

Truly frightening post! :)

Experienced cavers do have ropes, and maps, and are careful about their air supply. One of our geology grad students participated in a record setting cave dive twenty years ago--they can go underground for months. Still, there are fatalities.

Me, I'm sorta claustrophobic, and have only been in a few caves--a commercial one in South Dakota, and small caves mostly lit by exterior light. And one in Kentucky:

Sometimes precautions are forgotten. I was hitchhiking forty years ago and stayed with some UK students. One night, some of the cavers in the bunch suggested a couple carloads of us go to a cave. We drove almost an hour on the highway, then down a gravel road. We walked a quarter mile through brush, no trail, and entered the cave by crabwalking for twenty feet under a rock slab over a small stream. It opened into a decent size cavern, with passages going different directions. We only had three or four flashlights (I had none), but the leaders seemed to know where they were going. It was easy walking, and we must have walked for miles. Our destination was a large room with a raging river. The river roared out of one side, and quickly disappeared into the other side, less than fifty feet. We saw no graffiti anywhere along the way.

We continued on, and some of us started grumbling about going back. The flashlight with my group seemed to be going a little dim. The leaders agreed we should go home, and started out--and a couple of us were certain we'd came from a different direction. There was a moment of near panic, until we were told we'd gone in a circle and were back at the entrance cavern. It was daylight when we walked out.

Noclevername
2014-Aug-06, 10:51 PM
Pillbugs, wood lice, daddy longlegs, anything that gathers under a stationary object resting on dirt. I know they're harmless but they just look creepy.

redshifter
2014-Aug-06, 11:22 PM
Sneaker waves. They occur on our coast (west coast, USA) from time to time and some unfortunate beach walker will sometimes get swept out to sea. Usually with bad results. A sneaker wave is a much larger than normal wave that washes up on the beach without warning.

Trebuchet
2014-Aug-06, 11:43 PM
Pillbugs, wood lice, daddy longlegs, anything that gathers under a stationary object resting on dirt. I know they're harmless but they just look creepy.

Most of the above don't really bother me much. Earwigs, on the other hand....

redshifter
2014-Aug-06, 11:58 PM
Earwigs, on the other hand....

Yes. They seem nearly indestructible.

Moose
2014-Aug-07, 01:23 PM
Yes. They seem nearly indestructible.

Earwigs? They're not even remotely indestructible. Just spray a little soapy water on them. Dead in seconds.

HenrikOlsen
2014-Aug-07, 03:06 PM
Or simply squish them.

redshifter
2014-Aug-07, 05:17 PM
Earwigs? They're not even remotely indestructible. Just spray a little soapy water on them. Dead in seconds.

Please tell me more about this soapy water treatment, what about the soapy water is deadly to them? What ratio of soap/water is needed, or does it matter?

pzkpfw
2014-Aug-08, 12:48 AM
Sounds like another good reason to stop sticking cotton buds in my ears after a shower.

DaveC426913
2014-Aug-08, 03:35 AM
Centipedes.
Earwigs - because they always manage to crawl into the things I'm about to wear. And I'm sure those pincers can snip off a toe.
Slicing through my finger with an Xacto knife.
Drowning or buried-alive thoughts while trying to go to sleep.

Moose
2014-Aug-08, 10:42 AM
Please tell me more about this soapy water treatment, what about the soapy water is deadly to them? What ratio of soap/water is needed, or does it matter?

Heh, I have to apologize. What my father referred to as earwigs when we found 'em all over my winter tires one year weren't, apparently, earwigs at all. The concentration of soapy water wasn't much, vaguely the same you'd use to wash the dishes. In our case, we filled up a bucket, squirted in a dab of dish soap, mixed it around, then splashed cupfuls on the tires where there were bugs. I don't know why it killed them, but I was surprised by how quickly they died. I'm not sure what they actually were.

Might be worth a try on your earwigs, though.

Swift
2014-Aug-08, 01:36 PM
Heh, I have to apologize. What my father referred to as earwigs when we found 'em all over my winter tires one year weren't, apparently, earwigs at all. The concentration of soapy water wasn't much, vaguely the same you'd use to wash the dishes. In our case, we filled up a bucket, squirted in a dab of dish soap, mixed it around, then splashed cupfuls on the tires where there were bugs. I don't know why it killed them, but I was surprised by how quickly they died. I'm not sure what they actually were.

Might be worth a try on your earwigs, though.
I have a guess as to how the soapy water killed them, but I don't know, this is just a wild guess.

They drowned.

The soap would change the surface tension of the water, such that it would not bead up, but would actually wet the insects completely, and it would block the little tubes they breath through (called spiracles).

If that is the mechanism, it would probably work on most any insect, but it would not work on "pill bugs" (they are not really insects).

I know people use soapy water to kill other insects, such as insects like aphids on garden plants.

DaveC426913
2014-Aug-08, 01:42 PM
but it would not work on "pill bugs" (they are not really insects).
True! They're actually "land shrimp".

(No, really! They're crustaceans!)

NEOWatcher
2014-Aug-08, 01:48 PM
If that is the mechanism, it would probably work on most any insect, but it would not work on "pill bugs" (they are not really insects).
I had to look that up. All my life, we called those "patatah" bugs. I see that a potato bug looks much different and creepier.
Maybe if I lived closer to Mantua, I would have known better.

Swift
2014-Aug-08, 08:14 PM
Originally Posted by Swift
If that is the mechanism, it would probably work on most any insect, but it would not work on "pill bugs" (they are not really insects).
I had to look that up. All my life, we called those "patatah" bugs. I see that a potato bug looks much different and creepier.
Maybe if I lived closer to Mantua, I would have known better.
I've read from several sources that they probably have more local names than just about any critter. A lot of the names are some variant on "roll up" for their behavior.

http://insects.about.com/od/isopods/a/10-facts-pillbugs.htm

A pillbug goes by many names -– roly poly, wood louse, armadillo bug, potato bug – but whatever you call it, it's a fascinating creature.

And, as Dave said, they are actually crustaceans and most closely related to shrimp and "breathe" through gills (that's why they have to stay damp). And no, I don't know what they taste like or if cocktail sauce helps.

Moose
2014-Aug-08, 09:21 PM
The soap would change the surface tension of the water, such that it would not bead up, but would actually wet the insects completely, and it would block the little tubes they breath through (called spiracles).

Fast 'drowning'. The thingies on my tires pretty much dropped stone dead on contact. Like eerily fast.

grant hutchison
2014-Aug-08, 09:27 PM
Fast 'drowning'. The thingies on my tires pretty much dropped stone dead on contact. Like eerily fast.Were they silverfish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silverfish)? Would depend on where you stored your tyres, but people sometimes confuse silverfish and earwigs.

Grant Hutchison

Noclevername
2014-Aug-08, 09:44 PM
And no, I don't know what they taste like or if cocktail sauce helps.

According to Bear Grylls, they do taste pretty shrimpish.

Inclusa
2014-Aug-09, 03:06 AM
According to Bear Grylls, they do taste pretty shrimpish.
19745

Like these? These are somewhat salty mostly.

Moose
2014-Aug-09, 10:50 AM
Were they silverfish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silverfish)? Would depend on where you stored your tyres, but people sometimes confuse silverfish and earwigs.

'Fraid not. I'm familiar with silverfish. These were quite a bit bigger.

I'm questioning my memory more than a little bit, now. I seem to remember whitish slugs bigger than maggots, but I'm also getting the mental cues that usually indicate my memory of the event is faulty. They might really have been earwigs, pincered butts and all, and I'm not sure which memory is the false one (if not both). To answer your implied question, the tires were in a cheap aluminium shed (on cement sidewalk blocks, not raised in any meaningful way. After we killed that infestation (and cleaned up), Dad cobbled me a stand to raise the tires a few inches off the ground. Not sure why that stopped 'em from coming back, but it did the trick.

Swift
2014-Aug-09, 07:45 PM
19745

Like these? These are somewhat salty mostly.
The pill bugs we are talking about don't look that much like shrimp. They are also only about a centimeter long.

Image (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4e/Armadillidium_vulgare_001.jpg)

Swift
2014-Aug-09, 07:49 PM
Fast 'drowning'. The thingies on my tires pretty much dropped stone dead on contact. Like eerily fast.
From Colorado State University (http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05547.html)


How soaps and detergents kill insects is still poorly understood. In most cases, control results from disruption of the cell membranes of the insect. Soaps and detergents may also remove the protective waxes that cover the insect, causing death through excess loss of water.
I wouldn't think either of those mechanisms would cause instant death either.

Maybe they dropped because they didn't like it, but weren't instantly dead. Even if they dropped and didn't move, they were just "playing dead" so you wouldn't think to eat them.

Noclevername
2014-Aug-11, 04:05 PM
I wouldn't think either of those mechanisms would cause instant death either.


Disrupting cell membranes? That sounds like a killer to me. I suppose it depends on the exact physiology of the creature. "Whitish slugs" could be actual slugs, insect or other larvae, or faulty memories of many other things.

TrAI
2014-Aug-14, 05:20 AM
From Colorado State University (http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05547.html)


I wouldn't think either of those mechanisms would cause instant death either.

Maybe they dropped because they didn't like it, but weren't instantly dead. Even if they dropped and didn't move, they were just "playing dead" so you wouldn't think to eat them.

Hmmm... I am no expert on insects, but I seem to remember they have a network of tiny tubes that branches of from the main air holes, and that this spreads the oxygen to the cells in the body, so perhaps the soapy water can spread through these tubes too, and cause the disruption and/or deprive them of oxygen supply very quickly.

Jens
2014-Aug-14, 06:40 AM
Apparently, insects can survive without oxygen for considerably longer than mammals.

Moose
2014-Aug-14, 11:14 AM
Disrupting cell membranes? That sounds like a killer to me. I suppose it depends on the exact physiology of the creature. "Whitish slugs" could be actual slugs, insect or other larvae, or faulty memories of many other things.

I'm thinking faulty memory. It wouldn't be the first time I've wildly misidentified an insect species on first (very startled) sighting. I'm actually increasingly certain I remember noting that what I saw when Dad and I went back (with soapy water) was very much not what I'd thought I'd seen on first glance. I'm a bit more confident that what I saw (second time) actually were earwigs, pincer-butts included; or rather, I'd be more confident if I wasn't already dealing with what's increasing looking like a wildly false memory. :)

/ My bee phobia comes mostly from misidentifying as a bee queen _the size of a kitten_ what would probably have turned out to be a salt and vinegar chip bag moving in the wind. (I never did find out. Whatever I'd seen was gone when I went back a few days later.)

DonM435
2014-Aug-14, 12:58 PM
We once found a 12-legged monstrosity that turned out to be two stick-insects in close embrace. Not a pretty sight!

publiusr
2014-Aug-16, 06:26 PM
I remember reading a book where a WWII vet swore he saw an injured comrade eaten by sunfish.

Trebuchet
2014-Aug-16, 09:04 PM
Arthropod mouthparts (https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1366&bih=643&q=insect+mouthparts&oq=insect+mou&gs_l=img.1.0.0l10.1217.3499.0.6105.10.10.0.0.0.0.6 9.577.10.10.0....0...1ac.1.51.img..0.10.572.CIuI6e JvjdE#hl=en&q=arthropod+mouthparts&tbm=isch). I can handle the excessive legs, but those mandibles can be downright creepy.

Inclusa
2014-Aug-17, 02:34 AM
I remember reading a book where a WWII vet swore he saw an injured comrade eaten by sunfish.

This sounds a little bizarre, but I heard of giant groupers that killed people.

Paul Beardsley
2014-Aug-17, 06:50 AM
It is now ten years since I was attacked by an octopus. It didn't creep me out - it amused and intrigued me - but some people might have found it scary.

KaiYeves
2014-Aug-17, 03:37 PM
It is now ten years since I was attacked by an octopus. It didn't creep me out - it amused and intrigued me - but some people might have found it scary.

Squid and octopuses creep me out. It's just something about the tentacles and suckers... *shivers*

Oddly, I am not afraid of Giant Japanese Spider Crabs, the idea of being grabbed by something hard and armored is less scary to me than being grabbed by something squishy.

No doubt Dr. Freud would claim this reflects some aspect of my personality.

Trebuchet
2014-Aug-17, 03:44 PM
Regular squid and octopuses don't bother me. Tentacles and all. Those little soft tentacles on the face of a nautilus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nautilus_pompilius_(head).jpg), on the other hand, are pretty creepy.

Luckmeister
2014-Aug-17, 05:56 PM
The closeup of a fly's head doesn't creep me out.... unless it turns into Jeff Goldblum! :surprised:

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