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Silent Knight
2004-Dec-31, 02:57 AM
My keypal asked me about Colorado College, Colorado Christian University and the landscape of Colorado. Can you tell me anything?

cyswxman
2004-Dec-31, 03:12 PM
Don't know about the colleges themselves, but they are located along the front range of the mountains. The landscape is locally hilly, but the higher mountains come up abruptly just to the west of them, with the flat plains to the east.

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Dec-31, 03:18 PM
CC is in Colorado Springs, an hour south of Denver. CCU is in Lakewood, a suburb to the west of Denver. Big ski areas are an hour or two to the west.

Laser Jock
2004-Dec-31, 06:11 PM
My keypal asked me about Colorado College, Colorado Christian University and the landscape of Colorado. Can you tell me anything?

I don't know much about CCU. You can go to their webpage to find out about as much as I can tell you. Colorado College is here in Colorado Springs. It's a small, exclusive (expensive), private school. They have a rather strange system where you take just one class for 3-4 weeks straight. You still take 4 or so classes per semester. I personally don't think that I would like that system. Also, while it is expensive, I doesn't have all that great of reputation. Here in the Springs, it sort of has the reputation of being the school where all the rich (but not so bright) kids go. On the other hand, they do have a good hockey team.

The landscape of Colorado is the best in the US (not that I'm biased or anything :wink: ). People often think that all of Colorado is mountainous, but that is not true. The whole eastern third of the state is flatter than Iowa. Along the Front Range (where the plains meet the mountains) is where the major population centers are. From Denver north to Cheyenne (WY) is very flat. South of Denver to Pueblo (and including Colorado Springs) is a little hillier. While the entire Front Range is growing rapidly in population, we still have a lot of open spaces with few trees. It is not that unusual for visitors from the east or Europe to suffer from agoraphobia because the horizon can be so far away.

The mountains are the primary feature of Colorado. We have ~50 that are over 14,000 feet (14ers we call them), more than any other state including Alaska (Alaska has taller ones, but we have more of em'). Most of the 14ers can be scaled without special climbing gear, however they can be a challenging hike (especially if you are not used to the altitude). I have climbed over a dozen including Mt. Elbert, the tallest in Colorado. We also have some of the best skiing in the world. Since Colorado is semi-arid, our dry air creates snow that is a finer powder than you will find almost anywhere else.

The climate is great. Again, Colorado has the undeserved reputation of being a cold and snowy place. It can be cold and snowy, but it can also be 70 degrees in January. They high altitude (sun is more powerful) and dry air can cause the temperature to vary rapidly. Most people think that the weather can change fast where they live, but I've seen it go from 60 degrees and sunny to 30 degrees and snowing in less than an hour. Of course it can be 60 degrees again the next day. Finally, the weather is almost always sunny. We get 300+ days of sunshine (and I define sunshine as nearly cloudless) a year. It's great place for astronomy (if you can get away from the city lights).

sidmel
2005-Jan-03, 04:55 PM
I'll agree about the weather. Here in Kentucky, the saying is if you don't like the weather, wait a day. When I lived in Boulder, it was, if you don't like the weather wait 'till lunch. The whole 5 years I lived in Colorado, I think we used our air conditioner at home about twice, a bit more often when driving. I can remember hiking up to the Flat Irons with a about a foot of snow on the ground in nothing but shorts and a sleevless t-shirt(with warmer stuff in a backpack, just in case) and sitting on an upper deck at a bar having a drink in Feb.

Over all, I found the climate much milder in both Summer and Winter than here in Kentucky. Also, next to a couple of places in California and Hawaii, it gets more days with sunshine than other places. Where I live now, it can be overcast and sunless for weeks at time, especially in the Jan through March months.

Spacewriter
2005-Jan-03, 05:25 PM
GAAH!!!!

Now I'm homesick again!!!!


(Lifelong Coloradan, born and bred, doing time on the East Coast... )

8-[

Laser Jock
2005-Jan-03, 06:17 PM
GAAH!!!!

Now I'm homesick again!!!!


(Lifelong Coloradan, born and bred, doing time on the East Coast... )

8-[

Been there, done that (6 years of grad school in NY :-? ). Now I'm back and it's great. I love Colorado Springs, but things are getting a little too crowded here. I joke that we need to kick all the non-natives out so there is room for us true Coloardoans =D> . Maybe I'll move to Montana where there is still some elbow room :wink: .

Hey Spacewriter, here (http://www.dickgilbert.com/coloradocams.htm) are a few webcams that will "help" homesickness.

sts60
2005-Jan-03, 06:25 PM
I don't know anything about the colleges mentioned, but as far as the landscape goes, Colorado is:

"Let me introduce you. Great Plains, meet Rocky Mountains. Rocky Mountains, Great Plains." You just head west along flat, flat country, then... wham! Mountains. With about one row of foothills for transition.

While I lived in Boulder (only about a year and a half), we had February days in the 70s, and snow in June. Temperature dropping from 86 to 10 F from one day to the next. 100+ mph winds, not from a storm, just a windy day. 50 peaks over 14,000 feet (the "Fourteeners"). I loved it.

Now I live in Maryland within viewing distance of Sugarloaf *snerk* Mountain, which towers hundreds of feet over the verdant landscape. (pauses to let the vertigo pass) Don't get me wrong, Maryland is beautiful, but Colorado and the Southwest are really special. Of course, Knight, you understand that since you live in Utah...

Laser Jock
2005-Jan-03, 06:39 PM
Now I live in Maryland within viewing distance of Sugarloaf *snerk* Mountain, which towers hundreds of feet over the verdant landscape. (pauses to let the vertigo pass) Don't get me wrong, Maryland is beautiful, but Colorado and the Southwest are really special. Of course, Knight, you understand that since you live in Utah...

Snerk is right. While living in NY, I had a friend try to impress me with Mt. Washington (http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/whites/washington.html) (6,288 feet above sea level) :roll: . It's not a bad looking mountain, but really, that was the elevation that I was born at. My current apartment is at 6,800' and I work at about 7,200'. I'd really like to go to Nepal some day. They have real mountains there.

Spacewriter
2005-Jan-03, 08:28 PM
Now I live in Maryland within viewing distance of Sugarloaf *snerk* Mountain, which towers hundreds of feet over the verdant landscape. (pauses to let the vertigo pass) Don't get me wrong, Maryland is beautiful, but Colorado and the Southwest are really special. Of course, Knight, you understand that since you live in Utah...

Snerk is right. While living in NY, I had a friend try to impress me with Mt. Washington (http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/whites/washington.html) (6,288 feet above sea level) :roll: . It's not a bad looking mountain, but really, that was the elevation that I was born at. My current apartment is at 6,800' and I work at about 7,200'. I'd really like to go to Nepal some day. They have real mountains there.

Yes, we're within a 2 hour drive of Mt. washington. We got to the top and I said, "Okay. Great. So?"

but it was good to get back to the "home" altitude, if only for a couple of hours!

;)

(Born and raised in boulder, by the way; did my time at CU, twice.)

sidmel
2005-Jan-03, 08:52 PM
Been there, done that (6 years of grad school in NY ). Now I'm back and it's great. I love Colorado Springs, but things are getting a little too crowded here. I joke that we need to kick all the non-natives out so there is room for us true Coloardoans . Maybe I'll move to Montana where there is still some elbow room .

Driving from work in Denver to Bolder one day during a snow storm, the radio anouncer was complaining about all the people moving into the area from non-snow states and causing major wrecks. He said, everybody should be booted out, except people from Kentucky. It gave me a smile.

Ironically, it was shortly after that a brand new Mercedes with California plates came barreling down 36 to merge onto 25. Everybody else was driving about 35 due to the severity of the storm, but the Mercedes just couldn’t wait for all of slower drivers. He passed me on the left then crossed tow lanes of merging traffic to take the right hand exit. About 5 seconds later he spun around and slid back words down the side rail throwing sparks every where and totally destroying his drivers side. Needless to say, I couldn’t keep from busting out in random giggles for the rest of the day!

Spacewriter
2005-Jan-03, 09:26 PM
After we couldn't afford to live in Boulder anymore and bought a house in Denver, I commuted up 36 to the lab where I worked and studied. I saw dweebs such as you describe nearly every winter at least a couple of times a week. I'd like to think that if they keep driving like that, they rather neatly remove themselves from the gene pool...

We have been looking at houses in the Den-Bld area for a while, thinking about moving back. But the traffic and congestion really suck, and the real estate in Boulder is sky-high. We've looked around Estes Park and are also thinking of Northern New Mexico. Any move is a year or three down the road, but I do keep the web cams busy!

;)

Laser Jock
2005-Jan-03, 09:47 PM
We have been looking at houses in the Den-Bld area for a while, thinking about moving back. But the traffic and congestion really suck, and the real estate in Boulder is sky-high.

I wouldn't want to move to the Denver area for just that reason. It's bad enough where we live now. I-25 is still only 2 lanes from Castle Rock to Colorado Springs. At least they have expanded to three lanes from Castle Rock to Denver.

Estes Park is beautiful town, but real estate is getting expensive there too. Also, the tourist traffic can be a pain (for those who haven't been there, it's the town at the gates of Rocky Mountain National Park). Northern New Mexico is a beautiful (but dry) place. I was looking at a post-doc at Los Alamos in addition to the one here.