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Jeff Root
2014-Aug-16, 09:40 AM
I don't play any involved computer games. I play some of
the simple, single-player games that come with Windows
and a small handful of similar games. One that I picked up
somewhere online for free, in the same general category
as checkers or reversi, always results in the same set of
emotions at the end of the game, and they are exactly the
wrong emotions. Completely not what I want from a game.

That prompted me to wonder what I do want a game to make
me feel. And to ask you: What do you think a game should
make you feel when you reach the end of a game?

My intention is that this information could be used to help
someone design better games.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Hlafordlaes
2014-Aug-16, 12:46 PM
I use games first to keep sharp, and then to have fun. I want to feel challenged and entertained, or laugh with others if playing in a group. Lots of excuses for friendly faux-insult banter.

Everyday I do a few puzzles, such as the "I, Zombie Endless" level in Plants vs Zombies. All simple puzzles, but try getting to 22 levels! Did that once and never again. I use Lasertank for more difficult puzzle solving, though I have to drop it for a couple of years so I don't remember any solutions. There are some really, really tough puzzles in that one. I have quite a few favorites, but #184 gives me fits for hours.

Must've played 10^gazillion Solitaire levels in Windows, and Minesweeper, too (I use the gray XP version; works under 7.) Throw in a few Chess Titans, which I only play at speed and lose 90% of the time (level 8 only). As for video games with little fun puzzles that also have some action, I enjoy replaying Legacy of Kain: Soul Reaver and finding all the upgrades and secrets (under PS2 emulation on Win7).

But the number one, all-time, major time sink has been The Elder Scrolls: Oblivion. I easily spend three times the time I play on setting up and adjusting a full set of mods and tweaks, then play through a stunning world with a new twist or two each time. Every major PC upgrade since 2006 has been to improve performance on that game. A number of people here have played it, but from what I gather have mostly moved on to the next game in the series, Skyrim. The fact that the games have bugs and require patching, plus are CPU limited, means that one gets to delve into PC tweaking land to make things really go smooth, which appeals to my geek side.

There are so many games that are fun to play as a family. We are about to unbox some of our old gear, and in it is a PSOne with Crash Bandicoot Team Racing, one of our old faves. Hilarious and competitive, a great time. Wife loves it, too.

So, there you go. All oldies, but goodies.

DonM435
2014-Aug-16, 02:37 PM
I don't play any computer games, never have. (Except for classic things like chess or backgammon, or the occasional word game.)

I was learning serious computer programming at the time computer games gained wide availability, so my interest has always been in creating graphics, not in appreciating them. The idea of maneuvering down some graphic tunnel and shooting anything that pops up just doesn't appeal to me. Add to that that I have really bad tactical skills (I must have some learning disability here) in the few games that I have tried probably makes it worse.

Solfe
2014-Aug-16, 03:03 PM
I love games. Minecraft, Bolo, various MUDs. Spore is fun.

Basically, classic games over newer titles. I have website titled "These old games". I have gotten out of the habit of updating it, so I may be getting rid of it soon. (Hence, no link.)

DaveC426913
2014-Aug-16, 04:07 PM
I burned out my video game gland when I was in my 20s - on standup arcade games such as Williams Defender.

It's left me with the distinct feeling that, any time I try to play a game now, it's just burning time. Then again, I've always stuck with single-player games, so not a lot of socializing.

The only games I've spent any time on as an adult are SimCity and Myst. For me, I like puzzle games or construction games.

Trebuchet
2014-Aug-16, 04:10 PM
My computer gaming is pretty much limited to Sudoku on my phone! It's got Angry Birds on it, but I haven't been playing it much.

grant hutchison
2014-Aug-16, 04:17 PM
We seem to be begging the question.
Is it at all common to experience emotion on finishing a game like Reversi or Minesweeper? Surely that's a bit like grieving for your chewing gum.

Grant Hutchison

profloater
2014-Aug-16, 04:35 PM
We seem to be begging the question.
Is it at all common to experience emotion on finishing a game like Reversi or Minesweeper? Surely that's a bit like grieving for your chewing gum.

Grant HutchisonYou mention Minesweeper and my wife happens to be amazingly fast at that and certainly crows when she beats her previous time. It involves very fast arithmetic and practice makes you faster and faster.

Jeff Root
2014-Aug-16, 05:31 PM
I compared the game which prompted my question to reversi
and checkers, but it is actually more like minesweeper in some
ways. Like minesweeper, there is no opponent. Like reversi,
the board is gradually filled until no more pieces can be placed.

The problem is that the game cannot be won. It always ends
with a series of increasingly useless moves. All strategy and
plans made toward the end of a game fail. The last four or five
moves of the game can never increase the player's score. Plus
the game board and the score are instantly cleared when the
game is lost, so unless I remembered to notice the score while
the game was in progress (or it was in the top five), the score
is lost. This results in increasing frustration as the game nears
the end, and disappontment and disgust when it does end.
Those emotions-- frustration, disappointment, and disgust-- are
bad guys. I'm asking what good guys should replace them.

BTW, my question was probably also prompted by hearing a
story on NPR several hours earlier about an arcade owner in
Uganda who found that his clients were destroyng the game
controllers at an unusually high rate because they were taking
their frustrations and anger out in the games. I'm sure this is
relevant, but I'm not sure how.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Jeff Root
2014-Aug-16, 05:44 PM
Minesweeper is actually the only game that came with Windows 7
that I play. I play older or third-party versions of a couple of the
others.

My best time on Minesweeper (beginner level, 10x10, August 1) is
10 seconds, but it is extremely dependant on how the mines are
randomly placed. The frustration in Minesweeper is to end the
game with a situation that has a 50-50 chance of a correct choice,
and choosing incorrectly, thus ending a winning streak and having
to start over from the beginning. Bad, but not nearly as bad as
the other game, which isn't worth naming.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

publiusr
2014-Aug-16, 06:22 PM
That's the only game I ever played on a computer (at work I confess)

But after a minute or two, I have to get up. First person shooters I might play at a movie theatre once in a blue moon.

Hlafordlaes
2014-Aug-16, 07:08 PM
19768 (113 sec.)

Was a shameless addict, especially when depressed. Only played on Expert. Stopped mostly nowadays.

profloater
2014-Aug-16, 07:12 PM
19768 (113 sec.)

Was a shameless addict, especially when depressed. Only played on Expert. Stopped mostly nowadays. I think my wife at her prime was about 32 s on expert, sorry, but for me 113s would be really good. Don't fret about it hey? I wish I had not told you now.:)

Hlafordlaes
2014-Aug-16, 07:50 PM
Impossible, the physics of clicking do not allow it with that many squares and mines. Seriously. I switched from a wireless to a wired mouse to improve my score. Unless it was an uncanny, self-revealing distribution with a trivial number of clicks. You can get that on Beginner or Advanced, but Expert?

OK, now out comes the proof and I have a miserable afternoon...

profloater
2014-Aug-16, 08:09 PM
Impossible, the physics of clicking do not allow it with that many squares and mines. Seriously. I switched from a wireless to a wired mouse to improve my score. Unless it was an uncanny, self-revealing distribution with a trivial number of clicks. You can get that on Beginner or Advanced, but Expert?

OK, now out comes the proof and I have a miserable afternoon...maybe my mistake, i checked, 40 mines, 27 s is that advanced or expert,? it seems pretty fast to me.

grant hutchison
2014-Aug-16, 08:33 PM
OK. I'm sorry, I seem to be on the wrong planet.
You guys play Minesweeper because you care about the score? Not just to pass the time when you've simultaneously lost your book, your headphones and your internet connection, and got tired of looking at people and out of the window?
Wow.
Really. Wow.
I'd never imagined such a thing.

Grant Hutchison

Hlafordlaes
2014-Aug-16, 09:15 PM
I was surprised I cared about anything at the time, so I went with it. There are competitions in a third-party downloadable version. I don't do those.

Anyone play Internet Hearts?

Jeff Root
2014-Aug-16, 09:19 PM
No, it is unlikely that anyone here plays Minesweeper because
they care about the score, but that doesn't mean we don't care
about the score when we play...

Some aspects of Minesweeper scoring are decent compared to
other games: It doesn't keep track of an average or total over
all games played, which removes any pressure to ger a fast
time every time. That would be cruel. But many games *are*
cruel like that.

The score tells you how well you did. We want to know that
we did good. Is that bad?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

grant hutchison
2014-Aug-16, 09:51 PM
The score tells you how well you did. We want to know that
we did good. Is that bad?Not bad. Just ... flabbergasting.
I can't imagine caring about such a thing. I didn't know there were people who cared about how well they did playing Minesweeper.

Grant Hutchison

Hlafordlaes
2014-Aug-16, 10:03 PM
You compete against yourself. Repeating without improvement is no further challenge at all. Only reason I have a screen shot is that XP used to need frequent reinstalls, so I kept screen shots of my high scores.

Among Windows games, what I really enjoy is a nice 25-1 mauling of some would-be moon shooter in Internet Hearts, often as a result of my initial toxic 3 card pass, or doing the fake run and forcing the Queen on high card holders trying to stop me.

grant hutchison
2014-Aug-16, 10:11 PM
You compete against yourself. Repeating without improvement is no further challenge at all. Only reason I have a screen shot is that XP used to need frequent reinstalls, so I kept screen shots of my high scores.You kept screenshots of your scores?
I'm definitely in the wrong part of town.

To me, the challenge is in figuring out how the game works. Once you see how it's done, the interest is gone. Repetition is just ... repetitive.
Sudoku's a fine example. Why do people keeping playing Sudoku when it gets to the point of systematically repeating a small number of well-known algorithms?

Grant Hutchison

Hlafordlaes
2014-Aug-16, 10:25 PM
Perhaps. One must pause to consider before venturing to make judgement. Even in the absence of mitigating factors, it is not a simple thing to take full and proper measure of things. You are missing information, and much, in this case. I would advise a moment's caution, and reflection on what it is you truly wish to say, and above all, why, and what it conveys.

ETA Posted prior to edit above.

grant hutchison
2014-Aug-16, 10:46 PM
Perhaps. One must pause to consider before venturing to make judgement. Even in the absence of mitigating factors, it is not a simple thing to take full and proper measure of things. You are missing information, and much, in this case. I would advise a moment's caution, and reflection on what it is you truly wish to say, and above all, why, and what it conveys.There's no judgement being made here (by me, at least).
I'm just encountering a new area of human endeavour. Keeping screenshots of your high scores implies that they matter to you quite a lot, no? The fact that the OP enquires about emotional responses to playing these games, and the fact that others know their best scores, too, suggests that this deep level of engagement is pretty common.
Don't you have a strong sense that you're part of the majority, and I'm an outlier? Because that's the feeling I have. Very much the wrong part of town.

Grant Hutchison

caveman1917
2014-Aug-16, 11:51 PM
There's no judgement being made here (by me, at least).
I'm just encountering a new area of human endeavour. Keeping screenshots of your high scores implies that they matter to you quite a lot, no? The fact that the OP enquires about emotional responses to playing these games, and the fact that others know their best scores, too, suggests that this deep level of engagement is pretty common.
Don't you have a strong sense that you're part of the majority, and I'm an outlier? Because that's the feeling I have. Very much the wrong part of town.

Grant Hutchison

Why the wrong part of town? Your score obviously reflects your skill at the game (comprising in this instance of, for example, very quick arithmetic with low numbers). Suppose you want to increase your skill. For example, you're a bartender so it's very handy to quickly do these things in your head while people order drinks etc. So you decide to play Minesweeper to increase that useful skill, and you keep track of your scores to see your progression.

Hlafordlaes
2014-Aug-17, 07:13 AM
Keeping screenshots of your high scores implies that they matter to you quite a lot, no? The fact that the OP enquires about emotional responses to playing these games, and the fact that others know their best scores, too, suggests that this deep level of engagement is pretty common.

Screen shots require Alt+PrtScn, then dumping into an RTF file with Ctrl-V. Trivial, takes seconds, and keeps information that is otherwise lost on an OS reinstall.

Hadn't thought about this for a long time, but in fact it was a claim on another board, in a similar thread, that someone got a score below 90. I decided to test that, and found it was impossible. Turned out to be true of some of the other claims the same person was making.

I do have other pursuits, depending on time, inclination, evolution of disease, and available budget after medical expenses of no small import.


(1) I seem to be on the wrong planet. You guys play Minesweeper because you care about the score?
(2) Not bad. Just ... flabbergasting. I can't imagine caring about such a thing.
(3) You kept screenshots of your scores? I'm definitely in the wrong part of town.


There's no judgement being made here (by me, at least)
In keeping with baseball, three iterations with the same outcome may be considered decisive, which coincided with the timing of the observations made.

grant hutchison
2014-Aug-17, 07:26 AM
In keeping with baseball, three iterations with the same outcome may be considered decisive, which coincided with the timing of the observations made.I see no judgement in any of the phrases of mine you quoted. Expressions of surprise, yes. A clear declaration that I don't understand the take others have on this topic, yes. And a very definite sentiment that I am out of step with everyone else - for sure.

Grant Hutchison

grant hutchison
2014-Aug-17, 07:33 AM
Why the wrong part of town?Because on this thread a large number of people are conducting themselves in a way I don't understand.
I feel like I got lost somewhere, and I have that edgy sense of being misplaced that comes from winding up somewhere you shouldn't be.
And now, for some reason, it seems to be a big deal that I've announced I'm in the wrong place.
Maybe I'll just see if I can flag down a taxi ...

Grant Hutchison

Paul Beardsley
2014-Aug-17, 07:46 AM
Grant, I think you are overdoing this.

I, personally, don't keep records of my scores in games. Other people do. Okay, so we're different in this respect. So what?

Some gamers like to focus on combat, others like to focus on racing, or graphics, or a combination of these things. I like to focus on exploration and situational problem-solving and story.

Gaming is a broad church. Different people get different things out of it. Needing a metaphorical taxi to get out of here just because people "do things different" sounds much more socially aberrant to me than a penchant for recording scores does.

Jeff Root
2014-Aug-17, 09:48 AM
What surprises me is that Grant can be surprised when people
care about how well they do playing games, when he must be
aware of things like football, cricket, tennis, and poker.

Not to mention school. Students care about and keep records
of the grades they get on tests in school? What a strange
notion! Games are so often tests.

Exploration and situational problem solving has a huge appeal
for me, but either I haven't been exposed to any games where
they are done well, or I wasn't any good at them, or I just had
bad luck. Like, an ancient text game which I think was titled
"Lost in New York City" started out on Liberty Island, but I
couldn't discover how to get off the island.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Strange
2014-Aug-17, 10:25 AM
What surprises me is that Grant can be surprised when people
care about how well they do playing games, when he must be
aware of things like football, cricket, tennis, and poker.

I have to say, I am with Grant on this one (whether it is Minesweeper or football). It is an important part of other people's lives which is quite alien to me.

Paul Beardsley
2014-Aug-17, 10:39 AM
Going back to the original question:

There are some games which I have played incessantly as a result of some compulsion. I am left with an empty feeling because I am aware of the time I have wasted doing something that wasn't much fun and could have been spent advancing my writing career. Various Solitaire-style card games, and Minesweeper, come under this category.

I spent a lot of time playing UFO: Enemy Unknown aka X-COM. I occasionally had the empty, time-wasted feeling, but I also got to chat to colleagues about it, exchanging tips and strategies, including my brilliant tip that shocked people. There was a narrative element to it; I got to the end and was very pleased to have successfully completed it.

When Clare bought me a PS2 one Christmas (probably 2001) I was a bit uneasy at first, as I thought I would revert to my teenage self playing pointless games on my own. But we quickly discovered that a number of games worked best when we played them together, me usually (but not always) driving while she observed and made suggestions, some of them brilliant ones. Suddenly gaming changed from a withdrawing-into-myself thing to a valuable part of our marriage. We have spent a lot of time together completing a variety of games, mostly adventures with a strong narrative content: Silent Hill, Zelda, Broken Sword, Syberia.

To my mind, the experience of us playing the best games is similar to the experience of following a thoroughly engaging drama series - one that doesn't get axed before it is completed! The involvement and sense of achievement is much deeper because of the challenges we faced and overcame.

Somewhat separate, I started playing 2048 a few months ago. When I finally won, I disciplined myself not to play any more.

caveman1917
2014-Aug-17, 03:23 PM
Because on this thread a large number of people are conducting themselves in a way I don't understand.
I feel like I got lost somewhere, and I have that edgy sense of being misplaced that comes from winding up somewhere you shouldn't be.
And now, for some reason, it seems to be a big deal that I've announced I'm in the wrong place.

No big deal at all, just expressing surprise - at least allow the same interpretation that you're expecting to be made towards you. ETA: Not surprise that keeping scores with Minesweeper would be alien to you, but that you would conclude that observing such behaviours you don't understand would lead you not to consider them as a challenge in the positive sense (ie a learning opportunity) but as meaning that you're in the wrong part of town. Again, no judgement, just surprise.

caveman1917
2014-Aug-17, 03:31 PM
I have to say, I am with Grant on this one (whether it is Minesweeper or football). It is an important part of other people's lives which is quite alien to me.

Chess players keep their scores, they are even published on the FIDE website. It's not that alien (ETA: to me at least).

Solfe
2014-Aug-17, 03:36 PM
I find myself playing games for two reasons, fun and story telling.

Civilization (insert your favorite number here) is a fun turn burner that I can go back to any time. I don't necessarily play to completion. Minecraft has a similar vibe, but far more freeform. X-Wing is another game I play often. Just one mission here or there.

When it comes to story telling, I find myself playing Gemstone IV online (a MUD). The whole world has an overreaching adventure of the season, but the player characters really drive the story. It's is both new and old at the same time, every day, year after year.

Another great series of games is Kingdom Hearts. This one is special to me because the whole family played this one to completion. It's a single player game and we did it "old school" by passing the controller around the room, eating popcorn and drinking soda. It was like being back in college or high school. It was the center of good fun without being the purpose of fun.

We tried this with Spyro the Dragon on PS2 and it was equally fun. My younger children have Skylanders, but they dominate the game and are unwilling to share the controllers.

Strange
2014-Aug-17, 10:42 PM
Chess players keep their scores, they are even published on the FIDE website. It's not that alien (ETA: to me at least).

It is to me, a non-chess player. (Where "chess" could be substituted with pretty much any game or sport... :))

Paul Beardsley
2014-Aug-18, 05:38 AM
It is to me, a non-chess player. (Where "chess" could be substituted with pretty much any game or sport... :))

The point is, when people are into things you are not into, do you say, "Well, each to their own," and continue to socialise with the people in question? Or do you react as if they are scary people that you must avoid?

Nicolas
2014-Aug-18, 08:04 AM
I'm mostly into simulations (still on Grand Prix Legends after 16 years) and sandbox fun such as GTA. I also like to program my own games, for the challenge of it.

Feelings: for simulations, the concentration that makes you forget the rest of the world, the excitement and fear when you nearly lost it at 300kph, the joy of beating your best time. For sandbox games: just having fun with the algorithms, seeing how much chaos you can create in the virtual world etc. Letting the kid inside me out. :)

Hlafordlaes
2014-Aug-18, 08:50 AM
I like racing games, too, but my son always wipes the floor with me. And boy do those games make your pulse rise; I could only play on weekends, but never to relax after work.

Heid the Ba'
2014-Aug-18, 09:51 AM
I don't play them because I'm obsessive and would lose days. I am happy to remain friends with anyone who does play but I'm not interested.

SeanF
2014-Aug-18, 01:05 PM
Or do you react as if they are scary people that you must avoid?
I have to wonder if Grant was aware that the expression he used, "wrong part of town," implies exactly this.

mkline55
2014-Aug-18, 03:16 PM
I think a good game should give you a sense of accomplishment when you complete it successfully. Puzzle games are good for that. For an old one, try Colossal Cave (or Zork I). I recently found my old Zork I game including the box, and remember the satisfaction of solving the tricky problems like how to map your way around in the "maze of twisty passages, all alike", or how to keep from smashing the vase.

Paul Beardsley
2014-Aug-18, 03:33 PM
I think a good game should give you a sense of accomplishment when you complete it successfully. Puzzle games are good for that. For an old one, try Colossal Cave (or Zork I). I recently found my old Zork I game including the box, and remember the satisfaction of solving the tricky problems like how to map your way around in the "maze of twisty passages, all alike", or how to keep from smashing the vase.

You cannot beat a good text adventure. ETA I mean, you can successfully complete one, but no other kind of game compares. IMO of course!

Fazor
2014-Aug-18, 08:15 PM
I'm late to this party, but love this subject. "What should a game do," or, "How should a game make you feel," is a subject that comes up a lot in the gaming community. A lot of people argue that games should teach a moral story, or make the player feel some deep, emotional message. Some argue that games should be strictly mindless fun.

But to me, that's like saying that all movies should make you laugh, or all movies should feature a deep love story. There's no reason that all games should only be for one thing. There's games I play that offer zero narrative interest, but the gameplay itself is just "fun." There's games I play that aren't necessarily "fun" to play, but tell amazing stories. As a gamer, I love both types of experiences.

Two recent (within the last year) examples -- Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons touched me in such a beautiful and meaningful way that I sat staring at the credits for nearly 20 minutes. I didn't remember a game making me feel that much emotion ever, and I've been gaming since the mid 80's.

Battleblock Theater, on the other hand, was one of my Game of the Year nominees last year, and it's story is silly and superfluous. The challenge and fluidity of the game mechanics themselves were the enjoyable part.

My advise to a developer making games wouldn't be, "You need to make your game do [this]." It would be, "Figure out what you want your game to do and focus on doing that."

Paul Beardsley
2014-Aug-18, 08:20 PM
"Figure out what you want your game to do and focus on doing that."

Excellent advice that can be readily adapted to a number of creative endeavours.

Strange
2014-Aug-18, 09:21 PM
The point is, when people are into things you are not into, do you say, "Well, each to their own," and continue to socialise with the people in question? Or do you react as if they are scary people that you must avoid?

The former definitely - I have friends who are seriously into games and sports of various sorts - but I might consider it a scary subject that I must avoid - I chose my barber partly because he doesn't insist on talking about football or golf.

(I did play (and complete) the original mainframe Adventure. Then I played Space Invaders because they had a machine at work. That's about it.)

caveman1917
2014-Aug-19, 04:35 PM
I don't play them because I'm obsessive and would lose days.

Me too but i do play them. Even if i lose days/weeks over being so obsessive as insisting to command and staff every division on the eastern front myself in say Hearts of Iron 3, or doing Distant Worlds on full manual, after a couple of months like this when i then finally end the game i consider the feeling enough for the time lost. And then one can just start over again :)

Though i'm not sure i'd really call it time lost. One thing about some games (in particular Sword of the Stars) that makes it a no-go for me is when the manual or other resources don't provide the mechanics in precise quantified terms, how can you find winning strategies unless you know things like "weapon X has a y% damage bonus against armour Z"?


I chose my barber partly because he doesn't insist on talking about football or golf.

I chose to have shaved hair because i couldn't find a barber who won't insist on talking about at least something :)

Hlafordlaes
2014-Aug-20, 08:46 AM
As an avid player, I have to admit there have been times that I was busy enough on topics of sufficient importance that there was no time nor inclination for play. At one point, for several years the only free time at all was only enough for reading the Sunday paper, quickly. When in that mindset, it is easy to find gaming absurd. Children helped me get out of that and get a renewed appeciation for play, an important social activity. Now that I'm older, I use games for easy and quick mental workouts.

Paul Beardsley
2014-Aug-20, 01:18 PM
I played a computer game while I was being interviewed for a job this morning. I'm hopeful about my prospects.

Jeff Root
2014-Aug-20, 02:15 PM
That's certainly interesting. Dunno what to make of it.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Paul Beardsley
2014-Aug-20, 02:33 PM
Thank you for commenting, Jeff.

The job includes teaching object oriented programming concepts to students, mostly male and aged 16-19. I demonstrated an old Spectrum game, Batty - it's one of those games with a bat, a ball, and bricks which disappear when hit by the ball. I played it for about 20 seconds. I explained to the panel that it was an old game and presumably not written in an OO language, but asked them to imagine they had to remake it using Java.

I then asked them to see how many objects they could identify in the game, and what properties would have to be defined.

I was pleasantly surprised that the woman from Personnel - who had no reason to be interested in these concepts - gave some of the most perceptive responses.

DonM435
2014-Aug-20, 03:56 PM
Commodore used to do those TV commercials wherein the kid appears before his college admissions board armed with his high scores on Space Invaders and Pac Man and so on, and gets the bum's rush. The commercials suggest that families get a real computer instead of a video game system for their children's sake.

Although if the kid is inquisitive enough, he can get useful things out of games. My son used to ask me all the time how the visual effects were done, and I'd make a (usually bad) guess. He always tried to do strange things to see if he could break the program. He'd load the binary files into an editor and change things, and sometimes it worked. We got him this software "game construction kit" and he made a few games on his own before he was ten.

grant hutchison
2014-Sep-02, 10:10 PM
My taxi took me to Alaska for a couple of weeks. :)

Just dropping in to say that, yes, I do know what the phrase "the wrong part of town" means, I chose it with care, I clarified my reason for choosing it an earlier post, and I still think it applies.
Anyone who wants to get into this further is welcome to PM me, and I can see at least one person I'm going to PM soon. I think meta-level discussion of what I meant when I said something irrelevant to the OP have probably outstayed their minimal welcome in-thread.
Now I'm gone again.

Grant Hutchison

Paul Beardsley
2014-Sep-03, 12:42 AM
Oh, btw I got the job. Playing a computer game during an interview worked out!

Solfe
2014-Sep-03, 01:06 AM
Oh, btw I got the job. Playing a computer game during an interview worked out!

During an interview? That is a gutsy move!