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View Full Version : Extremophiles, now on earth, can survive in space as well.



rtroxel
2014-Aug-29, 01:54 PM
Here is an article on how extreme life forms on earth (plankton and tardigrades) can survive the rigors of airless space. Maybe NASA should include a few of them on their next Mars lander?

http://mic.com/articles/96920/astronauts-just-found-life-in-outer-space-and-scientists-aren-t-sure-how-it-got-there

Roy

primummobile
2014-Aug-29, 02:55 PM
What if Mars already has organisms that we haven't discovered? Should we intentionally contaminate another world before we know?

Swift
2014-Aug-29, 03:19 PM
What if Mars already has organisms that we haven't discovered? Should we intentionally contaminate another world before we know?
Yes (as in yes I agree with the concern, not yes we should intentionally contaminate Mars). Or even Mars doesn't have organisms, if you contaminate Mars with these organisms, alive or dead, it will make it that much more difficult to determine if Mars currently has, or ever had life.

marsbug
2014-Aug-29, 03:58 PM
If these organisms aren't some form of experimental error or contamination then they are probably already there. Remember that the clean room facilities where craft are built are low on organic matter, humidity, free water, and the craft are UV treated before launch. It's an ideal environment to rapidly select, from micro-organisms present on spacecraft surfaces, those most likely to survive the trip through vacuum and the Martian surface. The question is: Could they concievably have multiplied when there?