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Inclusa
2014-Sep-08, 03:07 AM
West Africa was home to many civilizations: Fulani, Benin Empire, Hausa, Ashanti, Wolof, etc.
Except for Mali/Ghana/Songhai Empire, Kingdom of Kongo, Kanem Empire, these civilizations control exceptional small territorial areas by modern standard.
Reasons for their small size?

Noclevername
2014-Sep-08, 03:17 AM
West Africa was home to many civilizations: Fulani, Benin Empire, Hausa, Ashanti, Wolof, etc.
Except for Mali/Ghana/Songhai Empire, Kingdom of Kongo, Kanem Empire, these civilizations control exceptional small territorial areas by modern standard.
Reasons for their small size?

Difficult terrain and a lack of beasts of burden?

grant hutchison
2014-Sep-08, 09:56 AM
They look small on a map of Africa marked up with the huge post-colonial countries. Compare them with a historical map of Europe, or even a current map of Europe.

Grant Hutchison

jokergirl
2014-Sep-08, 11:09 AM
Didn't we already have a thread like that?

grapes
2014-Sep-08, 12:32 PM
Didn't we already have a thread like that?
Sorta. Twenty-three posts here:

Many believe that Sub-Saharan Africa didn't have civilizations, but a few civilizations has emerged in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Mali and Songhai Empires were definitely civilizations; they may not have their own written language, but they used Arabic. They had elaborate military and administrative structures.
The late Mali civil strife caused major loss of cultural products back from Mali and Songhai, I believe.
Hausa kingdoms were fairly powerful and developed, and they started their own written language in both Arabic and Latin alphabets.
Due to the architecture of stonemasonry, most would class Great Zimbabwe a civilization; I just searched it was considered Shona in culture.
Other elaborate Bantu kingdoms have been formed in Sub-Saharan Africa as well.
I'm not too certain if formations of kingdoms and empires guarantee "civilizations", though.

grant hutchison
2014-Sep-08, 12:50 PM
Anyone interested in how these societies came about and operated would find much of interest in Gus Casely-Hayford's book and TV series, "Lost Kingdoms of Africa".

Grant Hutchison