PDA

View Full Version : English-to-English Dictionary



Ut
2005-Jan-04, 04:00 PM
I know I saw another thread about this kicking around somewhere, but I'll be damned if I know where it got off to. So, here's a fresh copy.

Now let's stop hijacking Banned Posters, eh?

Candy
2005-Jan-04, 04:04 PM
Now let's stop hijacking Banned Posters, eh?
American: chips
English: crisps

PyroFreak
2005-Jan-04, 04:05 PM
sounds good.


So as we were saying before, a napkin in Britain is a serviette, they say.
Well, I heard the work "napkin" in Britain refers to a sanitary napkin. Is that true? And "pants" is underwear I think.

worzel
2005-Jan-04, 04:10 PM
Now let's stop hijacking Banned Posters, eh?
American: chips
English: crisps
...Kiwian: chippies

English: chips
American: French fries

Ut
2005-Jan-04, 04:11 PM
I think you're thinking of knickerbockers. US usages is breeches. My knowledge on pants is a little dated, but according to my grandfather, pants refers simply to pantaloons, a specific style of pants.

Candy
2005-Jan-04, 04:47 PM
And Bob's your uncle! (http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Atlantis/2284/)
I was trying to find a English to American dictionary online. :wink:

Tensor
2005-Jan-04, 04:54 PM
Ahhhh, the first time I was offered a cigarette in Britian.... and my reaction. 8)

Laser Jock
2005-Jan-04, 05:05 PM
Ahhhh, the first time I was offered a cigarette in Britian.... and my reaction. 8)

:)

Plenty of opportunities for miscommunication from Candy's link. Napkin and Randy (common men's name in the States) come to mind.

:lol:

zebo-the-fat
2005-Jan-04, 05:07 PM
Ahhhh, the first time I was offered a cigarette in Britian.... and my reaction. 8)

Like the reaction of an American when told "I get through 20 fags a day!" :D

Tensor
2005-Jan-04, 05:10 PM
Ahhhh, the first time I was offered a cigarette in Britian.... and my reaction. 8)

Like the reaction of an American when told "I get through 20 fags a day!" :D

The offer of one was a bit of a surprise. :lol:

TriangleMan
2005-Jan-04, 05:12 PM
Some Canadian ones:

tuque (http://dictionary.reference.com/search?r=2&q=tuque)
chesterfield = sofa or couch

Ut
2005-Jan-04, 05:15 PM
Hrmm. That page seems to have its billions and trillions mixed up. Or I've gone crosseyed. Either is possible.

Spelled and spelt have confused me for years! I always assumed they were different tenses...

Some of the "translations" used there sort of bother me, though. For instance lawyer|barrister/solicitor, or zip|post(al) code. The legal/postal systems are substantially different. It's still correct, but in the sort of way that it's correct to call both a musket and an AK47 rifles.

jfribrg
2005-Jan-04, 05:18 PM
True story: an Australian exchange student here in the States needed an eraser, so told his teacher he needed a rubber.

Candy
2005-Jan-04, 05:22 PM
American: Kiss (passionate) Engish: Snog

I never heard this before, and I even dated an Englishman, once. :P

Jim
2005-Jan-04, 05:23 PM
Plenty of opportunities for miscommunication from Candy's link. Napkin and Randy (common men's name in the States) come to mind.

I'm curious. How many men do you know named "Napkin?"

Candy
2005-Jan-04, 05:24 PM
True story: an Australian exchange student here in the States needed an eraser, so told his teacher he needed a rubber.
http://www.click-smilies.de/sammlung0304/ernaehrung/food-smiley-024.gif

Ut
2005-Jan-04, 05:33 PM
Plenty of opportunities for miscommunication from Candy's link. Napkin and Randy (common men's name in the States) come to mind.

I'm curious. How many men do you know named "Napkin?"

Bort?

Let's not forget the Peter/Johnson/Dick conversation from a few weeks back, shall we?

I pity poor Richard Peter Johnson...

Wally
2005-Jan-04, 05:34 PM
Plenty of opportunities for miscommunication from Candy's link. Napkin and Randy (common men's name in the States) come to mind.

I'm curious. How many men do you know named "Napkin?"

=D> thought the same thing when I first read it, then realized L.J. was just demostrating what a missing comma or conjunction can do to a meaningful sentence! :)

Candy
2005-Jan-04, 05:34 PM
This one has 586 words in it's English-to-American Dictionary (http://english2american.com/).

As a Scot who has spent some time in the USA on holiday lately, I have discovered a bewildering array of words which are in common use on our side of the pond and invariably mean nothing at all or something exceedingly rude on the other side. I once noted down about fifteen of them and that afternoon formulated them into this dictionary. Since then the dictionary has thrived (well, lived) on contributions from readers and is steadily growing into a decent reference.
8)

Ut
2005-Jan-04, 05:35 PM
Oh! And William!

Poor Richard William Peter Johnson...

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Jan-04, 05:36 PM
I pity poor Richard Peter Johnson...
The folks named Dick, Roger, Orel, Willy, and Peter are forming a support group: PROWD (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=28626&highlight=prowd#28626).

Candy
2005-Jan-04, 05:38 PM
I pity poor Richard Peter Johnson...
The folks named Dick, Roger, Orel, Willy, and Peter are forming a support group: PROWD.
Dyslexic support group? 8-[

Laser Jock
2005-Jan-04, 05:39 PM
Plenty of opportunities for miscommunication from Candy's link. Napkin and Randy (common men's name in the States) come to mind.

I'm curious. How many men do you know named "Napkin?"

#-o

Bah, some people. Don't you know that you're supposed to read what I meant, and not what I actually wrote! :wink:

Wally
2005-Jan-04, 05:54 PM
UT. Over at the banned poster's thread, you said this:


Lunch is the meal served at or around noon. Dinner is the largest meal of the day. Breakfast is the first meal of the day. Supper is the last meal of the day. Depending on where you live, it may be customary for lunch or supper to be dinner, or neither. I, for instance, usually eat dinner around 5pm, and supper around 9pm. My family, however, when not at work, tend to eat dinner at noon and supper at 5.


I was always under the impression supper was a small meal later in the day, while dinner was the larger meal. Point being, you could have supper first, then have dinner later on if desired. Supper wasn't necessarily the last meal of the day. Am I wrong?

Candy
2005-Jan-04, 05:55 PM
ndex.html#catindex>Return to the category index
eone a ****** is not, as you might expect, altogether complimentary. It's really pretty rude in the UK which made me rather surprised when Adam Clayton of U2 said it at the end of a Simpsons episode. If you don't believe me, listen up.
Listen up! (http://english2american.com/dictionary/u2.wav)
What a funny website. Glom will like this .wav. :lol:

worzel
2005-Jan-04, 05:56 PM
According to Jasper Carrot (an English comedian) in Australia they have a brand of selotape (sticky back plastic) called Durex. He does this impression of an ausie shouting across the shop "I'll have a role of Durex love, king size".

Ut
2005-Jan-04, 06:07 PM
UT. Over at the banned poster's thread, you said this:


Lunch is the meal served at or around noon. Dinner is the largest meal of the day. Breakfast is the first meal of the day. Supper is the last meal of the day. Depending on where you live, it may be customary for lunch or supper to be dinner, or neither. I, for instance, usually eat dinner around 5pm, and supper around 9pm. My family, however, when not at work, tend to eat dinner at noon and supper at 5.


I was always under the impression supper was a small meal later in the day, while dinner was the larger meal. Point being, you could have supper first, then have dinner later on if desired. Supper wasn't necessarily the last meal of the day. Am I wrong?

According to MW (and I'm pretty sure the OED, but I don't currently have a copy readily avaliable anymore), supper is a light, late meal. That is, it takes place in the evening.

By the same rights, dinner is the largest meal of the day.

You're not disputing either of these.

Also, lunch is a midday meal.

How you overlap them, I'm sure, is a matter of region and dialect. But if you're sitting down to a huge meal past 9pm, I say you go right ahead and call it whatever you like ;)

However, I do know that traditionally, you sit to dine at the largest meal of the day, and you sup at the end. You breakfast in the morning, and you have a luncheon at midday.

Laser Jock
2005-Jan-04, 06:14 PM
UT. Over at the banned poster's thread, you said this:


Lunch is the meal served at or around noon. Dinner is the largest meal of the day. Breakfast is the first meal of the day. Supper is the last meal of the day. Depending on where you live, it may be customary for lunch or supper to be dinner, or neither. I, for instance, usually eat dinner around 5pm, and supper around 9pm. My family, however, when not at work, tend to eat dinner at noon and supper at 5.


I was always under the impression supper was a small meal later in the day, while dinner was the larger meal. Point being, you could have supper first, then have dinner later on if desired. Supper wasn't necessarily the last meal of the day. Am I wrong?

According to MW (and I'm pretty sure the OED, but I don't currently have a copy readily avaliable anymore), supper is a light, late meal. That is, it takes place in the evening.

By the same rights, dinner is the largest meal of the day.

You're not disputing either of these.

Also, lunch is a midday meal.

How you overlap them, I'm sure, is a matter of region and dialect. But if you're sitting down to a huge meal past 9pm, I say you go right ahead and call it whatever you like ;)

However, I do know that traditionally, you sit to dine at the largest meal of the day, and you sup at the end. You breakfast in the morning, and you have a luncheon at midday.

Don't forget second breakfast, elevensies (sp?), and tea. [-X :wink:

I think that calling it supper and/or dinner varies significantly just within the US.

Ut
2005-Jan-04, 06:18 PM
Right right.

Breakfast at 9. Second breakfast at 10. Tea at 10:30. Elevensies at 11. Brunch at 11:30. Lunch at 12. Tea at 3. Dinner at 5. Supper at 9.

Wow, the meal circuit really cools down after lunch, doesn't it?

frogesque
2005-Jan-04, 06:28 PM
UK - Petrol (ab. petroleum spirit), US Gas (ab. gasoline)

Fair enough, but what do you cook on in the US (besides electricity)?

Ut
2005-Jan-04, 06:29 PM
Barbecues. Stoves. Hot plates.

Propane and propane accessories?

Doodler
2005-Jan-04, 06:37 PM
Natural gas, hibachis

Moose
2005-Jan-04, 06:40 PM
Don't forget second breakfast, elevensies (sp?), and tea. [-X :wink:

Hmph. You beat me to it. [-(

Gramma loreto
2005-Jan-04, 06:54 PM
...but in the sort of way that it's correct to call both a musket and an AK47 rifles.
Sorry for the nit pick but...a muzzle-loaded long arm can be a musket or a rifle but the two are not the same. The difference is in the barrel...that is, whether or not it has rifling grooves. Muskets had smooth bores. When rifling was implemented on then-existing musket designs, the term "rifled musket" was used to differentiate them from their smooth-bored contemporaries. I'm not sure, from memory, when that term was shortened to just "rifle."

Moose
2005-Jan-04, 06:56 PM
...but in the sort of way that it's correct to call both a musket and an AK47 rifles.
Sorry for the nit pick but...a muzzle-loaded long arm can be a musket or a rifle but the two are not the same. The difference is in the barrel...that is, whether or not it has rifling grooves. Muskets had smooth bores. When rifling was implemented on then-existing musket designs, the term "rifled musket" was used to differentiate them from their smooth-bored contemporaries. I'm not sure, from memory, when that term was shortened to just "rifle."

Probably some time shortly after the breech loader.

Van Rijn
2005-Jan-04, 09:07 PM
UK - Petrol (ab. petroleum spirit), US Gas (ab. gasoline)

Fair enough, but what do you cook on in the US (besides electricity)?

"Gas" is also used as an abbreviation for "Natural Gas" (methane), hence the phrase "You're cooking with gas now!" Unless you run your car on natural gas, the context makes it clear which "gas" you are refering to.

Here's a terminology difference that caused some confusion for me: Saying "series" for what we would call a "season" of episodes. At one point, I suspected the entire British economy was dedicated to creating different Doctor Who series ...

Is anyone here familiar with the phrase "Going around Robin Hood's barn?" That probably has an English origin, and apparently used to be pretty common in Iowa, but I've never found anyone in California that has a clue what that phrase means (Pointlessly going around in circles).

Doodler
2005-Jan-04, 09:14 PM
In architecture, the toilet in a restroom is often noted on drawings with the symbol (W/C), meaning water closet, which I'm told is originally English.

Candy
2005-Jan-04, 09:44 PM
Nancy (http://english2american.com/dictionary/n.html#nancy) 8-[

mickal555
2005-Jan-04, 10:15 PM
Dunny, loo, long drop, out house = Toilet bathroom

Gas being short for gasoline used to confuse me I always thought gas was natural gas not petroleum (a liquid)

I think Diaper is a funny word as well as eraser (ie. rubber)

I suppose here we hear both terms but we usallly prefer the english( the amican words sound corney)

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Jan-04, 10:53 PM
Funny story:

The Myst computer game series contains a significant location called D'ni, pronounced "dunny."

Whoops. :)

captain swoop
2005-Jan-05, 01:16 PM
Automobile - Car

Hood - Bonnet
Trunk - Boot
Fender - Bumper
Station Wagon - Estate
Truck - Lorry
Wrecker - Break Down lorry


Faucet - Tap, what's that all about?

Kaptain K
2005-Jan-05, 05:08 PM
"Gas" is also used as an abbreviation for "Natural Gas" (methane)...
Nit-pick - Natural gas is not pure methane, but a mixture of methane (CH4) and ethane (C2H6).

Also:
US - Meth-ane, eth-ane
UK - Mee-thane, ee-thane

Enzp
2005-Jan-06, 07:12 AM
Faucet - tap? What's the problem? You have to call your spiggot something after all. Gives us something to think about while sitting on the couch/sofa/settee/divan. That works up an appetite for a sub/hoagie/grinder/hero.

beskeptical
2005-Jan-06, 08:16 AM
American: flu shot
English: flu jab

Irishman
2005-Jan-06, 11:55 PM
I don't think that some of those are direct analogs/analogues. For instance

closet = wardrobe?

I'm under the impression a wardrobe is a stand alone item of furniture. It happens to fulfill the same role as a closet - allowing one to hang up items of clothing. But a closet is typically built in to the walls.

However, they are a reasonable first pass to give someone the idea of what is meant. Certainly better than not having a clue.

Here's one

girl = gel ?

As an American, I would pronounce that as "jell", and think it related to gelatin. (I only know it from reading Pratchett.)

frogesque
2005-Jan-07, 01:19 AM
Irishman wrote:


Here's one

girl = gel ?

As an American, I would pronounce that as "jell", and think it related to gelatin. (I only know it from reading Pratchett.)

No, think more along the lines of The Pride of Miss Jean Brodie and her gels, the g is hard, the same as in girls


And another paper, a drawing done at age seven. All in black. Miss Butts sniffed. It wasn't as though the gel had only a black crayon. It was a fact that the Quirm College for Young Ladies had quite expensive crayons of all colors. Soul Music, Discworld series, Terry Pratchet.

tmosher
2005-Jan-07, 01:36 AM
I've always liked the english phrase "knocked up" - first time I heard it was in Oxford back in 1999 in reference to a wake-up call.

Candy
2005-Jan-07, 01:48 AM
I've always liked the english phrase "knocked up" - first time I heard it was in Oxford back in 1999 in reference to a wake-up call. I always like the drama that comes after that phrase. I have got to stop watching those afternoon judge shows. #-o

frogesque
2005-Jan-07, 01:49 AM
I've always liked the english phrase "knocked up" - first time I heard it was in Oxford back in 1999 in reference to a wake-up call.

You have to be carefull with that one, it can mean something a bit different. Er... how can I put this delicately ... a young woman who is, shall we say, er ... with child.

Gullible Jones
2005-Jan-07, 01:53 AM
On the Continent, "Hey you [censored] I knocked up ya [censored] mother" is something most high school students will hear at least once. :roll:

Tobin Dax
2005-Jan-07, 11:46 AM
I've always liked the english phrase "knocked up" - first time I heard it was in Oxford back in 1999 in reference to a wake-up call.

You have to be carefull with that one, it can mean something a bit different. Er... how can I put this delicately ... a young woman who is, shall we say, er ... with child.

Don't forget that she is usually without a ring.

Paul Mitchell
2005-Jan-07, 01:03 PM
Here's one

girl = gel ?

As an American, I would pronounce that as "jell", and think it related to gelatin. (I only know it from reading Pratchett.)
That's pronounced with a "hard" "g", like "girl". It's an attempt to show a somewhat old-fashioned/upper-class pronunciation.

Paul Mitchell
2005-Jan-07, 01:04 PM
Faucet - tap? What's the problem? You have to call your spiggot something after all. Gives us something to think about while sitting on the couch/sofa/settee/divan. That works up an appetite for a sub/hoagie/grinder/hero.
Oh so close! I was right with you until the last line 8)

I gather you're referring to some sort of large sandwich?

worzel
2005-Jan-07, 03:03 PM
Faucet - tap? What's the problem? You have to call your spiggot something after all. Gives us something to think about while sitting on the couch/sofa/settee/divan. That works up an appetite for a sub/hoagie/grinder/hero.
Oh so close! I was right with you until the last line 8)

I gather you're referring to some sort of large sandwich?

I fink you mean "mega buttie" mate.

Doodler
2005-Jan-07, 03:09 PM
I've always liked the english phrase "knocked up" - first time I heard it was in Oxford back in 1999 in reference to a wake-up call.

You have to be carefull with that one, it can mean something a bit different. Er... how can I put this delicately ... a young woman who is, shall we say, er ... with child.

Don't forget that she is usually without a ring.

"Knocked up" made the rounds in US slang back in the 80's with respect to being pregnant, at least here in Maryland.

worzel
2005-Jan-07, 03:10 PM
I've always liked the english phrase "knocked up" - first time I heard it was in Oxford back in 1999 in reference to a wake-up call.

You have to be carefull with that one, it can mean something a bit different. Er... how can I put this delicately ... a young woman who is, shall we say, er ... with child.

Don't forget that she is usually without a ring.

"Knocked up" made the rounds in US slang back in the 80's with respect to being pregnant, at least here in Maryland.
What about "Up the duff", or "bun in the oven"?

Doodler
2005-Jan-07, 03:19 PM
I've always liked the english phrase "knocked up" - first time I heard it was in Oxford back in 1999 in reference to a wake-up call.

You have to be carefull with that one, it can mean something a bit different. Er... how can I put this delicately ... a young woman who is, shall we say, er ... with child.

Don't forget that she is usually without a ring.

"Knocked up" made the rounds in US slang back in the 80's with respect to being pregnant, at least here in Maryland.
What about "Up the duff", or "bun in the oven"?

"Bun in the oven", though that's even older. I seem to recall it being used in the movie "Grease". The gossip chain about Rizzo. "Up the duff" is one I never heard.

Candy
2005-Jan-07, 03:23 PM
Don't forget the 'shot gun wedding' for those who had 'a bun in the oven'. 8-[

paulie jay
2005-Jan-08, 02:58 AM
Here's one.

In Australian sport (like football) we talk about "defence" where in American sport you talk of "DE-fence". Only a slight quibble, but here's the rub - when Australians talk about sport that is known as American (eg basketball) they also say DE-fence!

You say Offense - we say attack.

If it's not been mentioned already - Americans say "fanny" in reference to a girl's bottom. We say it in reference to her... more private parts!

Enzp
2005-Jan-08, 05:16 AM
Yes, but we Americans think a bum is a homeless beggar, not a body part.

Around here, knocked up still means pregnant. "With child" just comes off as artificially quaint. That is to say pregnant is not a bad word.

Yes, the sub - short for submarine, which the shape is remmeniscent of - et al is a sandwich. It is the kind made in a long loaf if bread and filled with cold cuts - sliced delicatessen meats and cheeses - and lettuce, tomatoes, and other things.

Doe, John
2005-Jan-08, 05:57 AM
Yes, the sub - short for submarine, which the shape is remmeniscent of - et al is a sandwich. It is the kind made in a long loaf if bread and filled with cold cuts - sliced delicatessen meats and cheeses - and lettuce, tomatoes, and other things.

Also known as a grinder or hoagie.

frogesque
2005-Jan-08, 08:45 AM
I've always liked the english phrase "knocked up" - first time I heard it was in Oxford back in 1999 in reference to a wake-up call.

You have to be carefull with that one, it can mean something a bit different. Er... how can I put this delicately ... a young woman who is, shall we say, er ... with child.

Don't forget that she is usually without a ring.

Maybe a bit subtle, with child implies a King James sense, ie. imaculate.

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Jan-08, 04:18 PM
Maybe a bit subtle, with child implies a King James sense, ie. imaculate.
The Immaculate Conception is from a Roman Catholic concept, not from the King James Version of the bible, and it refers to the conception of Mary not Jesus. I don't think the phrase "with child" has such an implication. Besides, tmosher was aware of that connotation, that's why they mentioned the other usage.

Yorkshireman
2005-Jan-09, 11:48 AM
US: Gotten = English: Got

This is quite an interesting one. As I recall, gotten is Elizabethan English, which got shortened over here, but was retained in the US. Shakespeare would have understood gotten.

mickal555
2005-Jan-09, 12:09 PM
do they say gotten oh my my english teacher would kill me

I can't get over their word 4 tap how do you prononce it? for-cet?

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2005-Jan-09, 12:33 PM
do they say gotten oh my my english teacher would kill me

I can't get over their word 4 tap how do you prononce it? for-cet?

Faw-cet ...

How about Mom and Mum, that, Always Threw me!

mickal555
2005-Jan-09, 12:36 PM
do they say gotten oh my my english teacher would kill me

I can't get over their word 4 tap how do you prononce it? for-cet?

Faw-cet ...

How about Mom and Mum, that, Always Threw me!
yeah Mom LOL somtimes the english call their mum, mam I think momma sounds weird too.

zebo-the-fat
2005-Jan-09, 05:48 PM
yeah Mom LOL somtimes the english call their mum, mam I think momma sounds weird too.

It varies in the UK as well, I call my mother "Mum" but my wife who is Welsh calls hers "Mam" Language is odd!

(Anybody here know what a Tump is?) :D

mickal555
2005-Jan-09, 05:50 PM
yeah Mom LOL somtimes the english call their mum, mam I think momma sounds weird too.

It varies in the UK as well, I call my mother "Mum" but my wife who is Welsh calls hers "Mam" Language is odd!

(Anybody here know what a Tump is?) :D
ITs always MUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUMMMM!!! here no vairation exept mabie mummy when younger.

Candy
2005-Jan-09, 05:56 PM
ITs always MUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUMMMM!!! here no vairation exept mabie mummy when younger.
So what do you call a mummy? A scary dead guy wrapped in cloth? :wink:

Ut
2005-Jan-09, 06:25 PM
ITs always MUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUMMMM!!! here no vairation exept mabie mummy when younger.
So what do you call a mummy? A scary dead guy wrapped in cloth? :wink:

Frank

Candy
2005-Jan-09, 06:30 PM
ITs always MUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUMMMM!!! here no vairation exept mabie mummy when younger.
So what do you call a mummy? A scary dead guy wrapped in cloth? :wink:

Frank
That's a hotdog. :lol: