PDA

View Full Version : Young Chixculub



Tom Mazanec
2014-Oct-20, 04:18 PM
We know what this astrobleme looks like after 66 million years. It doesn't look like much. In fact, on the surface it doesn't even look like an impact feature at all.
What did it look like after 66 thousand years?

Grey
2014-Oct-20, 07:18 PM
Maybe something like this (http://images.nationalgeographic.com/wpf/media-live/photos/000/642/cache/biggest-meteor-craters-on-earth_64290_990x742.jpg)? (That's from this (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/13/130214-biggest-asteroid-impacts-meteorites-space-2012da14/) page, and is an artist's rendition, obviously).

Trebuchet
2014-Oct-20, 11:03 PM
Maybe something like this (http://images.nationalgeographic.com/wpf/media-live/photos/000/642/cache/biggest-meteor-craters-on-earth_64290_990x742.jpg)? (That's from this (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/13/130214-biggest-asteroid-impacts-meteorites-space-2012da14/) page, and is an artist's rendition, obviously).

Ugh. I really dislike that image, superimposing a crater on what appears to be an otherwise unaltered coastline. The outer crater wall is continuous, yet the coastline continues along right where it appears to have been before, including bays and a river estuary.

Githyanki
2014-Oct-20, 11:56 PM
Not to mention, according to Blakey's maps, that was a sea-floor. Nice try though.

Romanus
2014-Oct-22, 10:38 PM
The space artist Ron Miller did what I think is the best depiction of what it looked like as a double-ringed archipelago, though he has part of it on the coast (but not continuous). Look for it in Hartmann and Miller's The History of Earth.